fbpx

PROFILE

MY SUBSCRIPTION

LOGOUT

x

The latest industry news to your inbox.

    

I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

June New Music Playlist out now

The latest edition of the IQ New Music playlist, featuring a selection of tracks curated by international booking agencies, is now live.

The playlist complements IQ Magazine’s popular New Signings page, which keeps the live industry updated about which new, emerging and re-emerging artists are being signed by agents. Click here to read the latest issue of IQ now.

The June edition of the playlist features tracks hand-picked by agents at CAA, Paradigm, X-Ray, WME, Mother Artists and Primary.

Listen to the latest selection using the Spotify playlist below, or click here to catch up on last month’s playlist first.

Separated by agency, the full track list for the June playlist is:

 

AgencyArtistSong
CAATion Wayne, La RouxIFTK
CAAAugust CharlesLately
ParadigmNoahfinnceChasing Daylight
ParadigmSudan ArchivesSelfish Soul
ParadigmJim LegxacyHit It Light It Twist It
ParadigmNate BrazierInertia
ParadigmDexterPressure
X-RayWax WorksPuffer Coat
X-RayPhoebe BridgersSidelines

X-RayThe Afghan WhigsThe Getaway
X-RayHypotheticsNewborn
X-RayMintFall back
X-RayRhodesThe Love I Give
WMECalvin Harris, Dua Lipa, Young ThugPotion
WMEUMIWish That I Could
WMEMoneybagg YoSee Wat I’m Sayin
WMEJordan DavisWhat My World Spins Around
WMEM.I.A.The One
Mother ArtistsJulieFlutter
Mother ArtistsNoSoParasites
Mother ArtistsYoungrAround The Wrld
Mother ArtistsJoy OladokunPurple Haze
Mother ArtistsRJ ThompsonYour Money or Your Life
PrimaryItsWillNo Love Song
PrimaryBlu DeTigerEnough 4 U
PrimaryBenny Mails, SpecsTime
PrimaryTalk ShowCold House
PrimaryChappaqua WrestlingFull Round Table

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Endeavor Q1 revenue boosted by demand for events

WME parent company Endeavor has reported significant growth in the first quarter of 2022, driven by the resumption of concert touring and demand for live events.

Endeavor, which also owns sports agency IMG and the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), among other properties, generated revenue of US$1.474 billion for the first fiscal quarter of 2022.

Net revenue came to $517.7m, while EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation) totalled $314.4m.

The agency’s representation business (comprising WME, sports agency IMG and Endeavor Content) generated revenue of $357.3m for the quarter, up $108.4m or 44% compared to the first quarter of 2021.

The segment’s adjusted EBITDA was $101.7m for the quarter, up $40.2m or 65%, year on year.

According to the company, the growth was primarily driven by increased brand spending, as well as higher commissions resulting from continued strong demand for Endeavor’s talent, and the recovery of live entertainment, primarily music and comedy touring.

WME artists include Drake, Justin Timberlake, Adele, Bruno Mars, Pearl Jam, Kendrick Lamar, the Killers, Bjork, Frank Ocean, Foo Fighters, St Vincent, Shakira and more.

“Our growth in the first quarter was driven by our ability to respond to the high demand for premium content and live events”

Elsewhere, the Events, Experiences & Rights segment revenue was $825.8m for the quarter, up $286.2m or 53% compared to the first quarter of 2021.

Increases were primarily driven by the return of more full-capacity live events in the quarter compared to the first quarter of 2021, including Super Bowl LVI, the Miami Open, the NCAA Final Four and Frieze LA, as well as $38m in revenue from the acquisition of NCSA, which closed in Q2 2021.

The segment’s adjusted EBITDA was $132.5m for the quarter, up $93.4m or 239%, year on year.

Owned Sports Properties segment revenue was $296.7m for the quarter, up $13.2m or 5% compared to the first quarter of 2021 – primarily driven by greater sponsorship, licensing, commercial PPV and event-related revenue for UFC among other factors. The segment’s adjusted EBITDA was $148.7m for the quarter, up $3.2m or 2% year on year.

“Our growth in the first quarter was driven by our ability to respond to the high demand for premium content and live events,” said Ariel Emanuel, CEO, Endeavor. “We feel great about where we sit relative to the secular tailwinds across all of our businesses, and we’ve raised our guidance for the fourth quarter in a row to reflect our positive outlook for the balance of the year.”

For 2022, Endeavor is projecting revenue between $5.235bn and $5.475bn, as well as adjusted EBITDA between $1.1bn and $1.15bn.

Last year, the company generated $5.1bn in revenue but posted a net loss of $467.5m.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

IFF 2022 launches with new central hub, agency partners

The eighth edition of the International Festival Forum (IFF), ILMC’s invitation-only event for festivals and bookers, is now live.

More than 800 delegates are expected to attend this year’s gathering of the international music festival business, with many of the world’s leading booking agencies signed up as partners.

Wasserman Music, WME, CAA, UTA, ICM Partners/Primary Talent, ATC Live, X-Ray Touring, One Finiix Live and Earth Agency are among the first to back the 2022 edition and many of whom will present showcases featuring the hottest new talent.

Alongside the showcases, IFF 2022 will offer the usual plethora of networking, showcases, panels, and parties – all taking place between 27 and 29 September in London.

In addition, IFF has announced a new central hub, the Holiday Inn in Camden, which will be transformed into IFF Central for three days.

IFF has announced a new central hub, the Holiday Inn in Camden, which will be transformed into IFF Central

IFF Central will be exclusive to delegates and will host all conference sessions, complimentary delegate lunches, a late-night bar that’s open until the early hours, and ample space for private meetings.

The hotel also features 100 rooms for delegates in a range of categories, which can be booked at the same time as registering your pass. Room rates are discounted for IFF delegates but there’s a limited number available. Click here for more details.

Since launching in 2015, IFF has gained a reputation for showcasing the most talented emerging artists at early stages of their careers, including Idles, Slaves, Loyle Carner, Public Service Broadcasting, Lewis Capaldi and Shame.

Last year, IFF enjoyed a successful return to a physical event, with a programme that featured a double keynote interview with Melvin Benn and Folkert Koopmans.

More details of IFF 2022, including the provisional schedule, will be announced in due course. If you have an idea for a panel topic, speaker or presentation, please email Ruud Berends.

A limited number of super discounted earlybird passes are now available for just £345 (saving £150 on the full rate). Each pass includes access to all sessions and showcases, lunches, dinners, and some drinks. Click here to register.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Live biz urged to embrace digital opportunities

A raft of top execs have urged the live business to embrace the opportunities of the digital world, amid the pandemic-accelerated convergence of tech, streaming, gaming and music.

Covering a range of hot topics from ticketed live-streaming to in-game concerts, the forward-thinking ILMC 34 panel Convergence & new frontiers explored the place of live performance in a post Covid-19 universe.

Moderated by freelance journalist Mark Sutherland, the session brought together the live and recorded music strands of the biz with speakers Jackie Wilgar of Live Nation, WME’s Levi Jackson, Tiago Correia of Warner Music UK and Jane Kinnaird of Meta.

“In our mind, even before the last couple of years, that opportunity for digital to really extend live – and its definition – has always been there”

“From the time we started Live Nation, the question we posed was, ‘What is the definition of live?'” said Wilgar, LN’s EVP marketing & consumer technology – international. “And can the digital world, in fact, allow us to expand that definition – whether that’s reaching people in markets and places they’ve not been able to attend a physical live show, or whether it’s taking the physical live show and just extending it beyond its current physical presence?

“So in our mind, even before the reality of what’s happened in the last couple of years, that opportunity for digital to really extend live – and its definition – has always been there.”

Creative strategist Kinnaird elaborated on the “huge” potential for combining the physical world with the metaverse.

“For me, it’s how you can augment a live experience for the people that are there,” she said. “The thing that I really want to explore is how you can enjoy something with someone else – it might be that one of you is at the live event but the other is at the augmented metaverse version.”

“We’re always about providing more avenues for fans to connect”

Correia, of Warner’s global digital business development team, discussed the rise of in-game concerts such as those seen on Fortnite and Roblox over the past couple of years (the label made an “eight-figure” investment in Roblox in 2021).

“There’s an entrenched audience in those games,” said Correia. “We don’t know if that audience is a fan of Tones & I in the case of Fortnite, for example, or a fan of Aya Nakamura. So there’s naturally a big opportunity to say, ‘Let’s try and capture those that aren’t and try to engage those that already are.’

“We’re always about providing more avenues for the fans to connect. And part of that is giving avenues for the artists to express themselves in new ways. Of course, it came in at a critical time where no one was able to do physical. It is not substitutional in any way. But, for a brief period of time, some people who couldn’t go to live, went to these virtual concerts in the hope that they could have some semblance of what those experiences are. I’m glad we were able to provide that service to them as well, because we were very happy with the results.”

He added: “There is still a bit of taboo and shame around games, because maybe we played them when we were young and we’re no longer that person. I think that that’s going to change. It’s not just a generational thing, look at the capabilities that you can do in games that you can’t do otherwise, I think people will understand that it’s quite a very important part of the entertainment industry as a whole and, as a music industry, that’s why we’ve done a lot in gaming. We need to be very, very aware of what’s happening and we need to be driving part of those conversations.”

“You’d be crazy not to look at gaming as an opportunity for distribution or inclusion”

“You’d be crazy not to look at gaming as an opportunity for distribution or inclusion,” agreed Wilgar. “Now, if the artists you’re working with are more relevant to a 65-year-old-plus crowd, maybe that’s not your right platform. But if you’re looking for distribution and reach, the reality is gaming is up there with sport. It is the fastest growing lifestyle reality of anything that exists worldwide right now. And it’s not just 12 to 16-year-olds playing games – the age demographic tends to be 24 through early 40s, or 40 through early 50s, in terms of the biggest growth areas for gamers.”

On the subject of live-streams, meanwhile, WME’s Jackson suggested that licensing hurdles had stunted the growth of the market and deterred some acts from embracing the format.

“Despite two years of live-streams through lockdown, people’s understanding of ownership and how we get the right licences in the right territories has been such a challenge… And it just puts people off,” he added. “If we could figure out a way to encourage everyone to participate and help each other there, it will probably encourage a bit of creativity to do it. Because at the minute, it does feel somewhat clunky. It’s enough for any artist that wants to look at this space to say, ‘I’m okay for now.'”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

ILMC 34: Top agents discuss post-pandemic landscape

Session chair Tom Schroeder (Wasserman) recounted his first ILMC experiences when he was accosted by private jet brokers who were not exactly relevant for his jungle acts. As a result, he said he wanted to make this year’s agency session a little more accessible for all.

Jon Ollier (One Fiinix Live) spoke of his recent experience with the start of the Ed Sheeran tour and the excitement around it, noting that outdoor shows appear to be more exciting than those indoors.

Looking for the positives in the current state of live music, Schroeder reported that young acts who have come through the pandemic appear to want to have a lot more ownership of their careers, with Lucy Dickins (WME) agreeing that there is a culture shift happening among the younger generation.

Ollier opined that it’s not just a generational thing, but also financial, as lots of people are buying tickets late, meaning that promoters have to take a leap of faith in investing in their events in the hope that people do turn up at the last minute.

The agents said [ticket] prices are not likely to come down as the artist’s costs have also increased

Sally Dunstone (Primary Talent) told ILMC that avails appear to have reached a saturation point, making it tricky to get to that next step with new artists. But she said this forced agents to be more creative and look to work with different venues, for example.

“We have to advise the artist on how they get to that next step in the career and if that means telling them to wait, rather than go out now and do a tour that could harm their long term prospects,” said Dunstone.

She said that her decision to switch agencies was down to the pandemic, thinking in a more entrepreneurial manner and searching for new opportunities – a sentiment echoed by Ollier who launched his own agency, saying that it was the CAA ethos of exploring new avenues and trying to always find a brighter path, that had prompted him to decide to establish his own venture.

Looking at the year ahead, Ari Bernstein (ICM Partners) observed the effect that festivals might have on other touring, highlighting radius causes and the like as issues that need to be discussed. He said Covid had made him look around for all the other revenue sources that his clients as artists could benefit from, which was something that would strengthen the sector going forward.

Schroeder said the new breed of young manager wants their agents to be a bigger part of the artist’s journey

Bernstein agreed with Schroeder that the price of living is going to squeeze the fans and there will be an impact that we are yet to experience. He also cited the war in Ukraine, rising costs and higher ticket prices, but accepted that it is now part of an agent’s role to negotiate those challenges.

On the thorny question of ticket prices, the agents said those prices are not likely to come down as the artist’s costs have also increased. But they said acts are already looking to tour with smaller productions in a bid to save money, as well as considering sustainability matters.

Schroeder said the new breed of young manager wants their agents to be a bigger part of the artist’s journey, rather than just a cog in the wheel.

Dickins also applauded the entrepreneurial spirit among young acts and younger agents. “The artists that tell me what they want to do, not the other way around,” she revealed. “There are things they are telling me that I think ‘shit, I’ve got to read up on that,’” she added.

Turning to the future, Dunstone predicted that in three to five years’ time the business would be fully recovered and progressed from where it was pre-pandemic. “People are looking at content differently now,” she said citing acts that have done well through the likes of TikTok. “I think we’ll see a fresh batch of new headliners in five years’ time, that have come through the pandemic,” said Dunstone.

“The artists that tell me what they want to do, not the other way around”

Ollier joked that Dickins would be working at his agency in three years, but on a serious note, he said there would be a period of natural selection with artists, events and probably even agents.

“Change is good,” said Dickins. “It’s been boring to see the same headliners at festivals for 15 years. I’m excited about the change and I’m embracing it – it’s already happening.”

Schroeder noted that while festival programming had improved, diversity in the actual industry itself was poor, with Dickins agreeing that the business needs to be a lot better.

Schroeder concluded that this summer will be bumpy but that agents need to navigate it. Ollier said, “The art is going to get better and better, no matter what us industry idiots have got to do.” That struck a chord with his fellow agents, with Bernstein believing that there will be more doors opening for revenue streams than ever before, as people embrace entrepreneurial ideas and think outside the box.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Jordan Hallpike joins WME’s UK office as agent

WME has announced that Jordan Hallpike has joined the company as a crossover agent in the music department.

Hallpike, who boasts more than 10 years of experience across the music and creative sectors, was director of music at the Ibiza Rocks Group, where he was responsible for talent booking, event programming, and creative direction. He is also co-founder of creative studio Midnight Movement, where he worked with clients including Live Nation, Island Records, Sky, ITV and Warner Music Group.

Based in London, Hallpike will be tasked with forging new creative opportunities on behalf of WME’s client roster, in addition to serving as a lead for business development projects.

Hallpike’s hire comes on the heels of several key promotions in the agency’s music group

Hallpike’s hire comes on the heels of several key promotions in the agency’s music group, including seven agents to partner and 17 staffers to agent across the Los Angeles, New York, Nashville, and Sydney offices. WME also recently announced that Dvora Englefield is joining the agency as a partner and head of music artist strategy.

WME’s music division represents a host of superstar clients such as Adele, Bruno Mars, Foo Fighters, Dua Lipa, Olivia Rodrigo, Tyler, the Creator, The Killers and Dave.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

April New Music Playlist out now

The latest edition of the IQ New Music playlist, featuring a selection of tracks curated by international booking agencies, is now live.

The playlist complements IQ Magazine’s popular New Signings page, which keeps the live industry updated about which new, emerging and re-emerging artists are being signed by agents. Click here to read the latest issue of IQ now.

The April edition of the playlist features tracks hand-picked by agents at CAA, ICM, ITB, Paradigm, UTA, ATC, WME, Mother Artists, Primary and Pure Represents.

Listen to the latest selection using the Spotify playlist below, or click here to catch up on last month’s playlist first.

Separated by agency, the full track list for the April playlist is:

 

AgencyArtistSong
CAAAmelia MooreMoves
CAAThe ShiresI See Stars
CAAElizaStraight Talker
CAAObongjayarTinko Tinko
CAAGuy GerberPyramid Of The Moon
ICMYumi ZoumaAstral Projection
ICMMarlon CraftHans Zimmer
ICMMarzzCountless Times
ICMLarry JuneSmoothies in 1991
ICMMike DimesHome
ITBHot MilkBad Influence
ITBJet VesperKind of Blue
ITBPlaceboHappy Birthday In The Sky
ITBSick JoyI’ve Got More Than I Need (And I Don’t Have Much)
ITBstayMellownowurgone
ParadigmBartees StrangeHeavy Heart
ParadigmDanielle PonderSo Long
ParadigmTiberius BOlivia
ParadigmTom A SmithCrucify Me
ParadigmYunè PinkuDC Rot
UTAStacey RyanDon’t Text Me When You’re Drunk
UTAFrankie Stew & Harvey GunnTears on my Window
UTAYeatMonëy so big
UTAJack KaneGold
UTAJung JaeilWay Back Then
ATCEnumclaw2002
ATCAldous HardingFever
ATCFolly GroupFaint Of Hearts
ATCSprintsDelia Smith
ATCEféKiwi
WMESigueJ Balvin, Ed Sheeran
WMEStrangeMiranda Lambert
WMEStars In The SkyKid Cudi
WMEBam BamCamila Cabello, Ed Sheeran
WMELeave You AloneKane Brown
Mother ArtistsBerSame Effect
Mother ArtistsRY XYour Love
Mother ArtistsThomas HeadonVictoria
Mother ArtistsViolet SkiesNever Be Cool
Mother ArtistsCorookidk god
PrimaryGames We PlayI Hope You’re Happy
PrimaryRussHandsomer (Remix) (Feat. Ktlyn)
Pure RepresentsGeorge EzraAnyone For You
Pure RepresentsThe MysterinesHung Up
Pure RepresentsBilkDaydreamer
Pure RepresentsCompanion23rd Street
Pure RepresentsMychelleYounger Self

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

WME announces 24 partner and agent promotions

WME has announced seven partner promotions and 17 agent promotions in its music division.

The seven agents promoted to partner are Cristina Baxter, Michael Coughlin, Ryan Jones, Richard Lom, Ben Schiffer, Peter Schwartz and Sam Wald.

Baxter and Schiffer are based in Los Angeles, Coughlin and Jones are based in Nashville, Lom and Schwartz are based in New York and Sam Wald is based in Sydney.

The 14 individuals promoted to agent include Tor Breon, Joe Friel, Allie Galyon, Noah Guthman, Andy Mack, Jordan Meisles, Tim Meldman, Michael Montante, Fernando Montes, Rico Pedraza, Jessica Phillips, Jesse Robbins, Brett Schaffer, Grace Stern, Mary-Michael Teel, Austin Tobias and Ian Wilkerson.

“These promotions all reflect the future of the music industry, and we are so proud of the continued creativity each of these individuals has demonstrated, both internally and on behalf of our clients,” say Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer, co-heads of WME’s music division. “Their out-of-the-box thinking, passion for artists and commitment to excellence set our group apart.”

Baxter joined the WME music department as an assistant in 2011. Her clients include Kygo, Miley Cyrus, Carly Rae Jepsen, Sofi Tukker, Kali Uchis and Ashnikko, among others.

“These promotions all reflect the future of the music industry”

Coughlin’s roster crosses multiple genres, including Lewis Capaldi, King Princess, Dean Lewis, The Revivalists, Ashnikko, Eric Nam and Inhaler.

Following his tenure in the non-traditional touring and adult contemporary department, Jones has led the private and corporate department since 2017.

With a focus on Latin music, Lom has developed his roster that includes J Balvin, Farruko, Caifanes, Cazzu, Juanes, Daddy Yankee, Bomba Estereo, Natti Natasha, Vicente Garcia, Cornetto and Agudelo888.

Schiffer works alongside his teammates with some of the most critically-acclaimed and award-winning artists today including Sheryl Crow, Olivia Rodrigo, Andy Grammer, Laura Marling, Keb’ Mo’ and Yebba, among others.

Schwartz is a veteran agent, representing AJR, Macklemore, Olivia Rodrigo, 24KGoldn, Lucky Daye, Aminé, Ferg and Joey BadA$$, among others.

Wald’s clients include Gang of Youths, Orville Peck, Sofi Tukker, Porter Robinson, Fatboy Slim, AJR, ZHU, Cordae, Earl Sweatshirt, Polo & Pan, TOKiMONSTA, Madeon, Alok, Channel Tres, JPEGMafia, Black Coffee and UMI, among others.

These promotions follow several recent new hires at WME, including Zach Iser and Caroline Yim who were brought in as co-heads of hip-hop/R&B from CAA, Craig D’Souza (international contemporary), Andy Duggan (international festivals) and Whitney Boateng (hip-hop and R&B), Dru Bass (crossover), Bailey Greenwood (electronic music), Dana Jeter (hip-hop and R&B) and Randall Uritsky (domestic festivals).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Endeavor shares first annual financials since IPO

WME parent company Endeavor has shared financial results for the fourth quarter, and fiscal year, of 2021 – the company’s first since going public in April 2021.

Endeavor, which also owns sports agency IMG and the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), among other properties, generated revenue of US$1.5 billion for the fourth fiscal quarter of 2021 and a net loss of $16.7m.

For the full year, Endeavor generated $5.1bn in revenue but posted a net loss of $467.5m.

“In our first year as a public company, we saw significant outperformance across our portfolio as the world began to emerge from the pandemic, with increased attendance at live events and continued heightened demand for premium content,” said Ariel Emanuel, CEO, Endeavor.

“Given the unique position we occupy in the content landscape, we remain confident about our ability to continue leveraging trends, unlocking growth, and delivering long-term value.”

“In our first year as a public company, we saw significant outperformance across our portfolio as the world began to emerge from the pandemic”

The agency’s representation business (comprising WME, IMG and Endeavor Content) proved to be a bright spot for Endeavor’s financials, reporting revenue of $717.9m for the quarter, up $443.2m, or 161%, compared to the prior-year quarter. For the full year, the business was up $2bn, up 100% from the $1bn realised by the segment in 2020.

WME artists include Drake, Justin Timberlake, Adele, Bruno Mars, Pearl Jam, Kendrick Lamar, the Killers, Bjork, Frank Ocean, Foo Fighters, St Vincent, Shakira and more.

Endeavor’s Events, Experiences & Rights segment revenue topped $156m in the quarter, up 23% year over year and $2.0bn for the year, up $437.8m, or 28%, compared to the prior year – driven by the return of live events among other things.

Meanwhile, Endeavor’s owned sports properties segment reported revenue of $277.3m for the fourth quarter, up $8.3m, or 3%, compared to the prior-year quarter. For the full year, revenue for the segment was up by 16% to $1.1bn, when measured against the prior year.

For 2022, Endeavor is projecting revenue between $5.2bn and $5.45bn.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Adele claims BRIT Awards hat-trick

It was a good night for WME clients at the BRIT Awards, with triumphs for Dua Lipa, Olivia Rodrigo, Bruno Mars and Dave, and a hat-trick of honours for Adele.

Adele, who is repped by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer on the touring circuit, took Song of the Year and Album of the Year for Easy On Me and 30, respectively, and was also crowned the inaugural Artist of the Year at last night’s (8 February) ceremony at The O2 in London. The gender-neutral award was introduced following the decision to scrap the male and female categories.

“I understand why the name of this award has changed but I really love being a woman and being a female artist,” said the singer. “I’m really proud of us.”

Elsewhere, Dua Lipa picked up the prize for Best Pop/R&B – one of four new genre awards – Dave took the Hip-Hop/Grime/Rap gong and Olivia Rodrigo’s Good 4 U was named International Song of the Year, while Mars claimed Best International Group with Anderson .Paak for their superduo, Silk Sonic.

US star Doja Cat withdrew from the event due to Covid cases within her crew

Paak is represented by ICM Partners/Primary Talent International outside North America. ICM/Primary acts also won out in the Best New Artist (Little Simz) and Group (Wolf Alice) categories.

Other victors included Ed Sheeran (Songwriter of the Year), who is represented by One Fiinix Live, Paradigm’s Billie Eilish (International Artist) and CAA’s Sam Fender (Alternative/Rock) and Becky Hill (Dance).

With US star Doja Cat withdrawing from the event a week before it took place due to Covid cases within her crew, the line-up for the UK music industry’s biggest night was comprised entirely of domestic acts. Kicking off with a surprise collaboration between Ed Sheeran and Bring Me The Horizon, performers also included Adele, Anne-Marie/KSI/Digital Farm Animals, Dave, Rising Star winner Holly Humberstone, Liam Gallagher, Little Simz and Sam Fender.

The full list of winners was as follows:

Song of the Year – Adele, Easy On Me

International Song of the Year – Olivia Rodrigo, Good 4 U

Pop/R&B Act – Dua Lipa

Alternative/Rock Act – Sam Fender

Dance Act – Becky Hill

Group – Wolf Alice

International Artist of the Year – Billie Eilish

Best New Artist – Little Simz

Hip Hop/Grime/Rap Act – Dave

International Group – Silk Sonic

Artist of the Year – Adele

Songwriter of the Year – Ed Sheeran

Mastercard Album of the Year – Adele, 30

Rising Star – Holly Humberstone

Producer of the Year – Inflo

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.