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Nordic music biz reveals Top 20 under 30 list for 2021

The fourth annual Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 list has been revealed, honouring the ‘young forces driving the Nordic music industry forward’.

According to organsiers Nomex (Nordic Music Export), the winners were chosen by a panel of 15 judges from the Nordic music industry, based on “company growth, career path, recognition in the industry, influence in the industry in 2020, artistic development, innovation, concert revenues, sales, streaming, campaigns, radio and television publicity”.

This year’s Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 list comprises:

Nina Finnerud, head of UK at Music Norway, commented on the list: “With the Covid-19 pandemic, we have seen that the recruitment of young people into the music industry is more important than ever.

“It’s crucial to show the new generation of managers, labels, agents, festivals etc that it is a safe and rewarding industry to work in and choose as a career. It is also vital to make sure the artists have talented people to work with them and look out for their best interest in the future.”

This year’s Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 will be honoured with a ceremony during by:Larm festival in Olso, Norway, on the 30 September.

Nomex was set up to facilitate growth and development in the Nordic music sector, and is a collaborative organisation set up by Export Music Sweden, Music Export Denmark, Music Finland, Iceland Music Export and Music Norway.

 


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Sweden to drop restrictions on live music

The Swedish government today (7 September) announced that it will drop almost all restrictions on live events by 29 September, when the penultimate stage of its roadmap commences.

From that date, capacity limits on indoor and outdoor shows will be removed, along with the requirement for attendees to be seated and socially distanced.

However, for a transitional period, vaccine passports may be required to attend events with more than 15,000 participants, according to culture minister Amanda Lind.

The news was announced during a press conference today, in which the minister of social affairs, Lena Hallengren, reported that 70% of adults in Sweden have received two doses of the vaccine while 80% have received the first injection.

“We are in a new and better situation”

“We are in a new and better situation,” Hallengren said.

The news will come as a relief to event organisers in the country, who had to deal with capacity limits as low as eight people for indoor standing shows.

Since 1 July, indoor standing concerts have been able to take place with a maximum of 50 people, seated indoor concerts with 300 people, standing outdoor concerts with 600, and seated outdoor concerts with 3,000. These restrictions apply until 29 September.

A date for the fifth and final stage – concerning congestion rules for shopping malls, cultural and leisure activities – is yet to be announced.

 


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Sweden’s TADC expands to Norway and Denmark

Swedish promoter Triffid and Danger Concerts has rebranded as TADC and opened offices in Norway and Denmark.

The company, formed in 2015 by the merger of Edward Janson’s Triffid Productions and Chris Rotenius’s Danger Music & Media, promotes more than 300 concerts a year in Scandinavia, as well as festivals such as Gefle Metal Festival and Atlas Rock in Gävle and the summer series Rock På Skansen in Stockholm.

“When we started the company six years ago our focus was on rock and metal,” says Rotenius. “In the future we will broaden our focus, and the change of name is a logical step, even though rock music will still be close to our hearts.”

In Norway, the business will be run alongside Jon Enger of Live Wire Concerts. TADC says it will launch a festival and summer concert series in Norway over the next few years.

“During the last couple of years the company has grown quickly and it feels like the right step to have a presence in Norway and Denmark as well,” says Janson. “We are looking forward to a lot of successful shows in all three countries.”

 


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ASM Global adds to Swedish venue portfolio

ASM Global has taken over operations of two further venues in Stockholm.

The leading venue manager has signed a “long-term” lease with the properties’ owners, brothers Jakob and Mattias Johansson, to manage the Södra Teatern, a theatre venue with a capacity of up to 600, and Mosebacketerrassen, a rooftop terrace that can accomodate around 2,000 people.

Since 2008, the company (as AEG Facilities) has operated a number of venues in the Swedish capital, including the 15,000-capacity Avicii Arena (formerly the Ericsson Globe), 8,300-cap. Hovet and 3,400-cap. Annexet. In 2013, it added the new Tele2 Arena, a 45,000-cap. stadium in south Stockholm, and in 2017 took over Friends Arena (75,000-cap.) in Solna, in Stockholm County, north of the city centre.

“It feels fantastic to help elevate this classical venue’s continued development”

“It feels fantastic to now be a part of and help elevate this classical venue’s continued development,” says Andreas Sand, GM of Stockholm Live, ASM Global’s subsidiary in Sweden. “Södra Teatern is already a great venue which has evolved tremendously in recent years, both through careful renovation of the property but also modernisation of the business.”

“There’s really no better place in the city to see local artists like Albin Lee Meldau, Petter or Weeping Willows than on Mosebacketerrassen,” he adds.

Södra Teatern (pictured) was built in 1852 and is one of Sweden’s oldest active theatres. Until 2018, the theatre was owned by Riksteatern, a publicly funded theatre institution, after which it was sold to the Johansson brothers.

 


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Sweden’s capacity limits: How low can they go?

While markets across Europe charge towards a full reopening, the Swedish live industry is still crawling to the finish line thanks to its government’s ever-stringent capacity limits.

The Scandinavian nation yesterday (28 June) announced that it will move to the second stage of its reopening roadmap on 1 July, permitting indoor standing concerts with a grand total of 50 people.

As of tomorrow, seated indoor concerts will be allowed to take place with 300 people, standing outdoor concerts with 600, and seated outdoor concerts with 3,000.

The government presented the five-step plan for removing Covid restrictions on 27 May, which commenced on 1 June.

Capacity limits for public gatherings, public events and private gatherings aren’t due to be removed until September

In the first stage of Sweden’s roadmap, the government imposed a capacity limit of just eight people for indoor standing shows – one of the lowest in Europe at that time.

Capacity limits for public gatherings, public events and private gatherings in Sweden aren’t due to be removed until step four, which is due to be initiated in September.

Meanwhile, FranceBelgiumthe Netherlands, DenmarkAustria and the UK have set a date this summer for the resumption of large, non-socially distanced shows.

The removal of restrictions comes too late for Swedish festivals, the majority of which have already been cancelled.

Major events such as Way Out West (12–14 August), Sweden Rock (9–12 June), Lollapalooza Stockholm (2–5 July) and Statement Festival (3–4 September) were called off earlier this year.

 


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Stockholm’s Ericsson Globe becomes Avicii Arena

Stockholm Live, the ASM Global-owned operator of Stockholm’s five major event venues, has announced the renaming of its 15,000-capacity Ericsson Globe arena to Avicii Arena in memory of the late DJ.

The company, along with local sponsors Trygg-Hansa and Bauhaus, has partnered with the Tim Bergling Foundation – set up by Bergling (Avicii)’s family in 2019 after the artist took his own life – to transform the Ericsson Globe into a “global symbol for mental illness prevention”, according to ASM Global.

“With our worldwide reach, ASM Global takes tremendous pride in not only presenting unparallelled entertainment experiences but also in playing a positive role in the lives of our millions of guests in countries throughout the world,” says the venue giant’s president and CEO, Ron Bension. “We’re honoured to participate in this collaboration to help prevent mental illness.”

The area, which opened in 1989, will become “a hub for sharing ideas and hosting activities with the focus on young people’s mental health,” comments Klas Bergling, the father of Tim. “It was a significant milestone in Tim’s career when he played here nine years ago, and he would be extremely proud that this iconic building from today will bear his name.”

“Being able to use one of Sweden’s most famous buildings … in the way we are now feels fantastic”

In celebration of the venue’s new name, the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra has recorded a new interpretation of the Avicii song ‘For a Better Day’, sung by 14-year-old Ella Tiritiello from Kristianstadm.

“Being able to use one of Sweden’s most famous and visited buildings as a symbol and meeting place for one of the most important societal issues of our time in the way we now do together with our partners feels fantastic,” says Stockholm Live CEO Andreas Sand.

“When we hosted the Avicii tribute concert in December 2019 at Friends Arena we got the idea to create a place that could spread the same understanding and community that we had that evening, with a focus on making a difference.”

Other venues run by Stockholm Live include Tele2 Arena (40,000-cap.), Hovet (9,000-cap) and Annexet (3,400-cap.).

 


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Sweden rules out major festivals this summer

The Swedish government’s new roadmap has hammered the final nail in the coffin of the country’s 2021 festival summer by ruling out major events until at least September.

The three-stage plan seals the fate of Swedish festivals – most of which have already pulled the plug.

Way Out West (12–14 August) is the latest major Swedish festival to be called off and follows high-profile cancellations from Sweden Rock (9–12 June), Lollapalooza Stockholm (2–5 July) and Statement Festival (3–4 September).

Regional events including Urkult, Bingsjöstämman, Storsjöyran, Dance Band Week in Malung, Gefle Metal, Putte in the Park (Karlstad and Luleå), Kiruna Festival and Uppsala Reggae previously called time on 2021 editions.

The roadmap, proposed by the Swedish Public Health Agency and commissioned by the government, suggests that from 1 June (stage three) outdoor events can take place with 500 seated and socially distanced attendees or with 100 standing.

Sweden Rock, Lollapalooza Stockholm, Way Out West and Statement Festival have been called off

Indoor events can take place with either 50 seated and socially distanced attendees or just eight standing.

Dates for the next two levels have not yet been given but the Public Health Agency believes that stage two will come into effect later in June or July, which is when outdoor events can take place with 3,000 seated and socially distanced attendees.

The majority of capacity limits will likely be scrapped in early September, which will mark stage one of the roadmap.

The Swedish government has been notably strict with restrictions for live music. In November, it imposed one of the lowest capacity limits in Europe, permitting just eight people indoors – a limit that, according to the roadmap, may not be lifted until July.

Sweden is the latest European market to pull the plug on the 2021 festival season due to uncertainty about the 2021 festival season, following widespread cancellations in Norway, Germanythe UKSwitzerlandDenmark and France.


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Eventim rolls out fanSALE platform in Scandinavia

CTS Eventim has launched its face-value ticket resale platform, fanSALE, in Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

FanSALE is the first fully digital face-value platform in Scandinavia, and is already in use in Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Italy, Finland and Brazil. In both Norway and Denmark, it is illegal to resell tickets for a profit.

When tickets are resold on the fanSALE platform, the original tickets are cancelled and new tickets issued in a new order, guaranteeing the new tickets and allowing for the resale of personal tickets when people can no longer attend an event.

“With fanSALE, Eventim is taking an important step in Scandinavia to help fans buy and sell tickets safely and legally”

“With fanSALE, Eventim is taking an important step in Scandinavia to help fans buy and sell tickets safely and legally amongst themselves,” says Jens Arnesen, CEO of Eventim Scandinavia.

“FanSALE guarantees that tickets cannot be sold for more than the original ticket price. At the same time, buyers are guaranteed genuine, valid tickets to the event.”

FanSALE is one of a number of capped-price resale services offered by the major international ticketing companies, along with See Tickets’ Fan-to-Fan, AXS’s MarketplaceTicketmaster ticket exchange and Ticketek Marketplace.

 


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Swedish gov proposes SEK 3bn event cancellation pot

Sweden has become the latest country to propose an event cancellation fund that will allow organisers to plan for the second half of the year without the financial risk posed by a potential Covid outbreak.

Under the SEK 3 billion (€292m) insurance scheme, the government is expected to cover the organisers of events planned between July and December 2021 for up to 70% of the costs, should their event be cancelled or restricted.

In the last year, various insurance schemes for events and festivals have been announced in Germany (€2.5bn), Austria (€300m), the Netherlands (€300m),  Belgium (€60m),  Norway (€34m), Denmark (DKK 500m) and Estonia (€6m).

Sweden’s support must be approved by the European Commission before the government can proceed.

“The limit [would be] a ceiling per beneficiary of €1.8m so that the aid does not risk violating the EU Commission’s framework”

Culture secretary Amanda Lind, who announced the support during a press conference last Thursday (1 April), says: “If we come to the conclusion that the temporary state aid regulations will be used, the limit is a ceiling per beneficiary of €1.8m so that the aid does not risk violating the European Commission’s framework.”

The government plans to announce details of how and when the support will be distributed in April.

In addition to the insurance cover, the government has announced another SEK 1.3bn (€127m) in ‘crisis and recovery’ support for the cultural sector in 2021.

The crisis package includes SEK 125m (€12m) in targeted support for certain state cultural activities, with most of the remaining funds to be distributed by the Swedish Arts Council.

Terms of the distribution are yet to be announced by the government.

 


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Major markets set out plans for Covid-19 passports

Australia and Iceland have joined a number of other markets across the globe in announcing plans for digital health passports which will show citizens’ Covid-19 vaccination and test status.

Iceland recently became the first European country to issue and recognise Covid-19 vaccination certificates to enable international travel for those inoculated against Covid-19.

Since early in the pandemic, the country has required a minimum five-day quarantine for international arrivals and now those with documentation showing they have received a full course of Covid-19 vaccines will be able to skip quarantine.

“You Check’s identity first [digital health passport] has a lot of potential to help venues and promoters manage risk”

In Australia, ahead of the nationwide rollout of the Covid-19 vaccine, the government has announced that all vaccinations will be recorded on the Australian Immunisation Register, and certificates would then be available digitally via the Express Plus Medicare app or in hard copy through the vaccination provider or Services Australia.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison told ABC National Radio it is “highly likely” that such documentation will be needed for international travel into the country.

Meanwhile, UK music venues are set to trial a health passport pioneered by London-based start-up You Check to accelerate the nation’s return to live.

The trials – which have been set-up in conjunction with Music Venue Trust (MVT) – are scheduled to take place at London’s 100 Club (cap. 350) and Bristol’s Exchange (cap. 250) in March.

The digital health passport will allow venue door staff and ingress operations to verify an attendee’s name, age, ticket and test result in one place and “facilitate communication between promoters and their full audiences, beyond the primary ticket buyer”.

[This] digital health passport will allow venue door staff and ingress operations to verify an attendee’s name, age, ticket and test result

“You Check’s identity first solution has a lot of potential to help venues and promoters manage risk,” says MVT CEO, Mark Davyd.

“It has a fast and thorough authentication process which enables health information to be stored against portable digital identity and MVT is pleased to be working with You Check to explore how this technology might form part of a comprehensive process which enables us to reopen every venue safely and revive live.”

Other nations that have revealed plans to launch a digital coronavirus passport include Sweden (by the summer) and Denmark (in three to four months), while Poland has already started issuing the digital pass to its citizens.

Elsewhere in Europe, Spain’s foreign minister Arancha Gonzalez has said “vaccine certification is something we are going towards inevitably”; Greek prime minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, has called upon the European Commission to introduce a standardized coronavirus vaccination certificate to facilitate travel within the European Union bloc, and Portugal’s interior minister Eduardo Cabrita has said that a vaccine certification would be easier to manage than the current Covid-19 requirements.

 


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