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Move’s Bad Bunny stadium show sells out fast

Bad Bunny’s highly anticipated hometown shows at Puerto Rico’s Hiram Bithorn Stadium sold out in less than 20 minutes, promoters Move Concerts and Noah Assad Presents have revealed.

The urban sensation’s P Fkn R show, rescheduled from May 2020, went on sale on Friday (20 August) and sold out soon after. The concerts, which take place at the 18,000-seat stadium on 10 and 11 December, will be Puerto Rico-born Bad Bunny’s first shows this year.

P Fkn R is the first announced show of a new partnership between Miami-based Move Concerts, which has an office in Puerto Rico, and Noah Assad, whose Rimas Music represents some of the world’s biggest reggaeton artists.

Everyone attending the P Fkn R show will be required to present proof of vaccination

Everyone attending the 10 and 11 December shows, which have a capacity of 35,000 each, will be required to present proof of full Covid-19 vaccination.

The Hiram Bithorn Stadium, the island’s largest, has previously hosted concerts by the likes Bon Jovi, Ozzy Osbourne, Rihanna, Shakira, Sting and Whitney Houston, in addition to its regular use as a baseball park.

Multiple Grammy and Latin Grammy-winner Bad Bunny will follow up the show with a world tour, El Último Tour del Mundo 2022, which kicks off on 9 February 2022 at the Ball Arena (20,000-cap.) in Denver, Colorado.

 


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AI-powered screens detect mask wearing at venue

A North Carolina stadium is using artificial-intelligence (AI) technology to monitor for Covid-compliant public behaviour, such as social distancing and the wearing of face coverings, among fans arriving at the venue.

The 50,500-capacity Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, which is primarily used for American football, has installed ‘Health Greeter Kiosks’ to encourage anyone passing to wear masks and practice social distancing. The AI – specifically machine learning and computer vision – uses real-time data from a depth-sensing camera to detect if someone is wearing a mask and whether there is proper spacing between individuals. As people walk by the screens, a large display alerts them to either correct or continue their behaviour.

The technology was developed by the University of North Carolina’s Reese Innovation Lab, with support from Lenovo North America, and first deployed for an American football match (University of North Carolina vs Virginia Tech) on 10 October. The kiosks, which were placed at locations such as entrances, bag-check queues and ticket offices, “worked as intended, tracking and encouraging safe behaviour”, according to Lenovo.

“These kiosks will help us better understand human behaviour and encourage safe behaviour”

“We needed real innovation to meet this unprecedented challenge, and pushing the limits of technology is at the core of our lab’s mission,” says Steven King, chief innovation officer of Reese Innovation Lab. “Engineering a technological response to Covid-19 and event-attendance restarting is a real and rewarding challenge, [and] I’m grateful for the support of UNC-Chapel Hill leadership, our exceptional and inventive students and Lenovo.”

The kiosks, which use fully anonymised data, with no images saved or transmitted, may help shape safety protocol and provide insight on how crowds behave during the coronavirus pandemic, adds King.

“We see this as the starting point of wider deployment, with opportunities to refine and customise the technology,” he explains. “From campus hallways to outdoor events, these kiosks will help us better understand human behaviour and encourage safe behaviour, and I’m excited to see how we evolve and adapt this AI-powered solution.”

 


This article forms part of IQ’s Covid-19 resource centre – a knowledge hub of essential guidance and updating resources for uncertain times.

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World’s first mobile stadium takes shape

Ras Abu Aboud Stadium, a 40,000-seat temporary venue billed as the world’s first ‘demountable’ stadium, is under construction in Doha, Qatar.

Constructed on an artificial promontory in the district of the same name, Ras Abu Aboud Stadium is being built to a modular design, and partly out of old shipping containers from Doha Port. It is one of eight new venues under construction ahead of the Fifa World Cup football competition in 2022.

The first moveable stadium in World Cup history, Ras Abu Aboud Stadium “will be entirely dismantled and repurposed post-2022, setting a new standard in tournament sustainability and legacy,” according to Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy (SC), which is overseeing the Qatar 2022 world cup.

In a tweet sent on Friday (16 October), the SC said the new venue is “slowly taking shape”:

After the tournament, says the SC, the “modular seats and even the roof will be disassembled and reused”.

What they’ll be reused for, however, is still under discussion: the Qatari authorities note its modular design “could provide the building blocks for another 40,000-seat stadium in a different location, or for several different types of sporting or non-sporting venues”.

The Qatar 2022 Fifa World Cup takes place from 21 November to 18 December, with 32 national teams taking part.

 


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WHO: Stadium events “unrealistic” in most countries in 2020

It is “very unrealistic” to expect to see packed New Zealand-style stadia in the majority of countries this year, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said.

Speaking during an online discussion last week, Michael Ryan, executive director of the WHO’s health emergencies programme, said it would be “disastrous” to allow the return of stadium-level events, such as sporting fixtures, in territories that still have “community-level transmission” of Covid-19, reports AFP.

“Large crowds of 40,000, 50,0000, 60,000 people… it’s not just the risk of being in the stadium – it’s the risk of going to the stadium, the public transport, the bars and the clubs,” said Ryan (pictured).

“Imagine all the problems we have now with nightclubs and bars, and you squeeze all of that together into a four- or five-hour experience, where thousands of people go on the same public transport to a venue, get involved in the social aspects before a game, be involved in the game and then all of the social aspects after. In the context of community transmission, that could be disastrous.”

“We’re just going to have to be careful for a good bit longer”

Ryan said he expected stadia to continue to allow small numbers of fans – up to around 2,000, with social distancing in place – in countries with active cases of Covid-19 for the foreseeable future.

“We all want our sport back,” he continued. “We’re just going to have to be careful for a good bit longer.

“It’s very unrealistic in countries with community transmission that we’re going to be seeing large gatherings like that this year. Right now, it’s hard to see those fully reopened venues.”

New Zealand – which recorded a 102-day streak without a new coronavirus infection – has several hosted major arena and stadium events, including a rugby match attended by 43,000 people, since reopening its live sector in July. Japan and South Korea have also reopened sports stadia to fans.

The WHO released its latest guidance on holding ‘mass gatherings’, such as large music and sports events, safely in late May.

 


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Austria to allow up to 10,000 fans in stadiums

The Austrian government is to permit up to 10,000 fans in stadiums from September, culture and sports minister, Werner Kogler, has announced.

According to reports, the 10,000-person capacity limit will apply to all outdoor events from 1 September, with indoors shows of up to 5,000 also allowed.

Seat allocations, social distancing regulations and the enforcement of a track and trace system are a prerequisite for events going ahead.

“This is a freedom that we have all developed together,” says Kogler, who serves as Austrian vice chancellor, as well as the minister for arts, culture, the civil service and sport. “We should handle it carefully.”

“This is a freedom that we have all developed together. We should handle it carefully”

It is believed that, after an initial phase with an audience limit, there will be individual solutions decided on a case-by-case basis.

“I imagine that we can try to measure it per stadium – it may be that 12,000 people is less of a problem in one stadium, than 6,000 in another stadium,” says Kogler.

As of today (1 July), a maximum of 250 fans are allowed to attend indoor performances, with a capacity of 500 permitted for outdoor shows.

Capacity limits are increasing to 1,000 for indoor events and 1,250 for outdoor shows from 1 August.

Photo: Die Grüne Partei Österreichs/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) (cropped)

 


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17k Finnish fans to travel to Estonia for Rammstein

Over 17,000 fans will travel from Finland to Estonia in July to see Rammstein performance at Tallinn’s Song Festival Grounds on 21 July 2020.

The sold-out concert, part of the second leg of the band’s European Stadium Tour, will see Rammstein play to more than 60,000 fans. Two thirds of concertgoers will travel from outside of Estonia to attend the show, with representatives from over 60 different countries.

The Live Nation-promoted concert will be the largest outdoor show in Tallinn since Madonna’s 2009 appearance in the Estonian capital.

Kicking off in May 2020 at the Wörthersee Stadion in Klagenfurt, Austria, the second leg of Rammstein’s European tour will visit Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Great Britain, the Netherlands, France, Italy, Poland, Norway and Sweden, before wrapping up at Ceres Park in Aarhus, Denmark, on 4 August.

The first leg of the tour saw the band play 30 concerts in 24 cities across countries including Spain, Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Russia and Latvia, as well as multiple nations that will be revisited in 2020.

Tickets for the stadium tour – the band’s first ever – broke records for ticketing partner CTS Eventim, selling more than 800,000 tickets in a single on sale.

The tour has been commended for its “fireworks, massive pyrotechnics and overwhelming smoke effects”, with German newspaper Nordkurier writing the band were “shaking European stadiums” with their live shows.

 


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Eagles to play Wembley Stadium in Europe exclusive

US rock band Eagles are bringing their Hotel California tour to London’s 90,000-capacity Wembley Stadium on 29 and 30 August 2020, the group’s only European dates of the year.

Eagles, consisting of Don Henley, Joe Walsh and Timothy B Schmit, along with Deacon Frey and Vince Gill, will perform the Hotel California album in full at the Wembley concerts, followed by an additional set of the band’s greatest hits.

The group recently performed three sold-out performances of the album – the third best-selling US album in history – in Las Vegas. The concerts marked the first time Eagles had performed Hotel California in its entirety and featured 77 musicians on stage, including a 46-piece orchestra and 22-voice choir.

As the best-selling US band of the 1970s, Eagles have won six Grammy Awards, were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998 and received the Kennedy Center Honors for lifetime contribution to US culture in 2016.

“We are delighted to welcome back The Eagles who played a huge part in this year’s success story”

The Live Nation-promoted shows see Eagles return to the stadium for the second time in as many years, following a sell-out show in June. The band contributed to a record-breaking summer for Wembley in 2019, with over 900,000 fans watching acts including the Who, Fleetwood Mac, Bon Jovi, Billy Joel and Pink.

“We are delighted to welcome back The Eagles who played a huge part in this year’s success story,” comments James Taylor, senior commercial manager for Wembley Stadium.

“Wembley is an iconic venue that attracts the biggest and best acts and we are thrilled this legendary band has once again chosen our world-class stadium for what will be their only performances in Europe in 2020.”

Tickets for Eagles 2020 Wembley Stadium shows go on sale on Saturday 14 December at 9 a.m. (GMT), available here.

 


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UK stadium success for the Hella Mega tour

The Hella Mega tour, the upcoming world tour jointly headlined by Fall Out Boy, Green Day and Weezer, has sold out multiple stadiums in the UK, shifting 150,000 tickets for its three SJM-promoted British shows next June.

The tour sees the three ’90s/2000s rock icons (all of whom are represented by Jonathan Daniel and Bob McLynn’s Crush Music) heading out on the road together for the first time.

The trio will touch down in Europe on 13 June 2020, playing their first show at Paris’s 40,000-capacity La Défense Arena; the UK dates are at Bellahouston Park in Glasgow, London Stadium and John Smith’s Stadium in Huddersfield, on 24, 26 and 27 June, respectively.

North American dates follow in July and August.

For a full Hella Mega tour itinerary, visit hellamegatour.com.

 


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Wembley Stadium hails “another incredible summer”

Saturday 6 July saw the Who bring the curtain down on the biggest-ever summer of concerts at Wembley Stadium in London.

Over the space of five weeks the 90,000-capacity stadium hosted 14 concerts, with 38 acts playing to some 900,000 fans. That’s down slightly on the more than one million predicted by stadium bosses before the summer, but still a new record.

K-pop sensations BTS kicked things off with two sold-out shows on 1 and 2 June as part of their Love Yourself world tour, with 140,000 fans also streaming the show live globally. Capital’s Summertime Ball festival took place the weekend after, followed by the much-hyped Spice Girls reunion shows, which saw 240,000 fans attend over three nights.

“We look forward to another exciting summer of music next year”

Other headline shows included the newly Lindsey Buckingham-less Fleetwood Mac, who played two nights, Bon Jovi, Billy Joel and Eagles, who played one night each from 21 to 23 June, Pink, who played two nights, and the Who, who rounded off the summer season with support from Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder.

James Taylor, Wembley’s senior commercial manager for concerts, comments: “It’s been another incredible summer of music at Wembley Stadium. We are privileged to have hosted such a diverse set of artists and to have welcome thousands of fans into the national stadium.

“We must also thank the stadium team who have worked tirelessly to adapt the venue to suit varying needs. We look forward to another exciting summer of music next year.”

 


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AEG to manage new Las Vegas stadium

AEG Facilities has been selected to operate 65,000-seat stadium under construction in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Set to open in August 2020, the US$2 billion domed stadium will serve as the new home ground of American football team the Oakland Raiders (who will become the Las Vegas Raiders when they relocate from Oakland, California), as well as hosting concerts, festivals, family shows and other sporting events.

AEG Facilities – the arena/stadia management division of AEG – will be responsible for all stadium operations, including hiring staff and planning the schedule of events for its 2020 opening.

“The addition of the stadium … will provide immediate opportunities to bring new high-profile events to Las Vegas”

“We are honoured to have the opportunity to partner with one of sports’ most recognisable, successful and iconic international brands,” says Bob Newman, president of AEG Facilities, “and with a city known as the ‘sports and entertainment capital of the world’ in a stadium destined to set new standards for the fan experience that will be created.

“The addition of the Las Vegas stadium into our global stadia network will provide immediate opportunities to bring new high-profile events to Las Vegas to take advantage of the incredible new stadium and a city that knows how to deliver best-in-class experiences and events.”

AEG Facilities already operates the 20,000-cap. T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, which opened in 2016. Other venues under construction in the city include the Sphere arena, owned by rival operator MSG.

 


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