fbpx

PROFILE

MY SUBSCRIPTION

LOGOUT

x

The latest industry news to your inbox.

    

I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

Rock in Rio founder plans new 105,000-cap festival

Roberto Medina, founder of the largest festival in South America, Rock in Rio, has announced a new event which is set to be “the biggest music, culture and art festival Sāo Paulo, Brazil, has ever seen”.

The inaugural edition of The Town will take place in September 2023, welcoming up to 105,000 people per day to the Interlagos race track in Sāo Paulo – the largest city in Latin America.

The event will involve “lots of music, lots of stages and lots of entertainment, with national and international attractions during the five days of celebration,” according to Medina.

“I love Brazil intensely,” says Medina. “And, just like Rock in Rio, The Town was born from this passion for our land, from the amplification of looking at new opportunities and from the desire that the pandemic brought me in these months of confinement to bring something new.

“It will be surprising. The entire concept was conceived based on an inspiring and cosmopolitan São Paulo, in addition to being ready to host an event of this magnitude.”

“The entire concept [of The Town] was conceived based on an inspiring and cosmopolitan São Paulo”

From next year, Brazil will host Rock in Rio (cap. 100,000) in even years and now The Town in odd years.

The Brazilian edition of Rock in Rio will be held between 2–4 and 8–11 September 2022 at the Olympic Park in Rio De Janeiro, and will be headlined by Justin Bieber and Demi Lovato.

The Lisbon-based edition of Rock in Rio (cap. 80,000) will also take place next year (18–19 and 25–26 June), with Foo Fighters, The National, Liam Gallagher, Duran Duran, a-ha, Xutos & Pontapés, Bush and Post Malone all confirmed.

The Brazil and Lisbon editions of Rock in Rio were called off in 2021 and 2020.

Rock in Rio is majority-owned by Live Nation after the entertainment giant increased its shareholding in the company, in 2019.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Wave of illegal concerts sweeps South America

Thousands of South Americans attended illegal, non-socially distanced concerts and parties over the Easter weekend, with authorities making arrests across the continent as national governments continue to battle the coronavirus with varying degrees of success.

South America remains a hotspot for Covid-19 – with high mortality rates in Brazil, Peru, Chile and Paraguay of particular cause for concern – though the recent unlicensed live events suggest some people are beginning to chafe under ongoing restrictions on indoor gatherings.

In the town of Turuku, in Ecuador’s northern Imbabura province, local government officials, national police and the armed forces shut down an unlicensed music festival, Killary Fest, which would have been attended by an estimated 5,000 people.

Despite dismantling the stage and confiscating much of Killary Fest’s equipment, including speakers, authorities returned on the evening of Friday 2 April to “learn that, despite the warnings, the party was starting”, reports El Comercio. When they again moved to shut down the event, police and soldiers were pelted with sticks and stones by revellers.

The incident follows months of parties, concerts and other unlawful events in Ecuador, reports El Comercio.

In Punta Arenas, the southernmost city in Chile, a local election candidate is being held by police after organising a concert in a former hospital, attended by around 100 people.

Brazilian police continue to target illegal parties, which are being blamed for the surge in Covid-19 cases and deaths

In addition to not seeking permission for the event, Juan Pablo Martinez – who is standing in upcoming city council elections – failed to enforce mandatory social distancing and mask wearing at the clandestine concert, according to prosecutor Rina Blanco.

The show “endangered public health, given the number of people in close contact, and who he invited,” Blanco comments.

A music venue in Morón, near Buenos Aires in Argentina, has been shut down for 30 days after video emerged of cumbia singer Pablo Lescano playing to a non-socially distanced audience.

The event, which many have dubbed “el recital covid” (the Covid concert), was harshly criticised by the mayor of Morón, Lucas Ghi, who says organiser Vaprisana “worship[s] mischief, deception and the violation in rules” – comparing the club unfavourably to the honest businesspeople of the city, who “adhere to the norms and protocols required by the pandemic”.

Brazilian police also continue to target illegal parties, which are being blamed for the surge in Covid-19 cases and deaths in South America’s most populous country.

The most recent brought together around 100 people – half of whom were caught not wearing face masks – in the city of Sao Paolo last weekend. According to local press, the three organisers were arrested, while the venue was fined R$190,000 (€28,000).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

La Morada: Top artists back Move CO aid for laid-off crew

Move Concerts has partnered with Spin Agency, an advertising and branding company, to launch La Morada, a new online entertainment hub designed to raise money for Colombia’s chinomatics, or production crews, during the coronavirus epidemic.

La Morada (which means both a home and the colour purple in Spanish) is a ‘virtual house’ made up of ‘rooms’ each containing specific content, such as live music, comedy, yoga, psychology, meditation, fitness classes, cooking and video games. Launched on 17 April, over 300 hours of free content has been created for the initial lifespan of the project, which was originally programmed to run for one month, until 17 May, but has been extended to 17  June.

Artists who appear in La Morada – which include Latin music stars such as J Balvin, Juanes, Fonseca and Carlos Vives – have donated their time for free, providing performance footage or exclusive interviews. Other content includes virtual PlayStation football matches (Colombia vs Peru is a recent highlight), and production masterclasses with Teo Echevarria and guests.

While all content is available for free, viewers have the option to donate money to provide a cesta basica (‘basic basket’) containing essential groceries for a family, including food and hygiene products, for the chinomatics and their loved ones.

Nicolas Martinez, marketing director for Move Concerts Colombia and director/partner at Spin Agency, recalls Covid-19 first hitting Colombia: “As the reality sunk in, fear was all that I felt. Twenty twenty was supposed to be our best year ever. We had a calendar filled with brand events and concerts. Our budget goals were already accomplished and then, out of the blue, our world froze.

“Then I started thinking about our office in Bogota, which operates with 32 people, plus hundreds of direct and indirect hires around events: producers, stagehands, roadies, security, sound and light engineers, riggers, tour managers, and other jobs that are the real foundation of our business – the chinomatics.”

While all content is available for free, viewers have the option to donate money to provide a ‘basic basket’ containing essential groceries

He continues: “I found out that Teo Echevarria, our head of production and Maluma’s production manager, was linked to an association, IPEE [Industria de Produccion de Eventos y Espectaculos, a union for production personnel), that was compiling a database of all the chinomatics who were going through a difficult time, and who were not even able to purchase basic food products for themselves and their families.

“To date, the database has a listing of more than 3,000 people.”

Using IPEE’s data, the Move and Spin teams came up with a project that would keep staff busy while generating some basic assistance for crew and their families.

Fernando Escobar, talent director for Move Concerts Colombia, who is also general manager for La Morada, adds: “We are essentially running a TV station that airs on a digital platform and social media with a programming grid that extends 7am to 11pm daily. This is non-stop.”

To date, La Morada, which is sponsored by Aval Group, has donated over 900 food baskets (out of a goal of 1,500 before the project ends) and been viewed by 600,000 viewers across all platforms (web plus Instagram and social media).

The ‘house’ can be accessed by going to www.lamorada.com.co or on Instagram at @lamoradaco.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

T4F’s Credicard Hall becomes UnimedHall

Brazil’s Time 4 Fun (T4F), the largest live entertainment company in South America, has secured a new naming-rights agreement for its venue in Santo Amaro, Sao Paulo.

The 7,500-capacity theatre formerly known as Credicard Hall is now called UnimedHall, with health cooperative Unimed becoming its naming sponsor for the next five years.

Since opening in 2000, UnimedHall has hosted performances by artists including Oasis, Kylie Minogue, Avril Lavigne, Demi Lovato and BTS.

T4F’s other venues include the KM de Vantagens Hall (8,450-cap.) in Rio de Janeiro and the Renault Theatre cinema in Sao Paulo.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Move Concerts allies with Loud and Live

Move Concerts, the largest independent promoter in Latin America, and US entertainment and sports company Loud and Live have announced a joint venture to pool their resources across North, Central and South America.

With over 40 years of live entertainment experience, Move has promoted shows by global icons including Ed Sheeran, the Rolling Stones, U2, Katy Perry, Phil Collins, Bruno Mars and Iron Maiden. It has offices in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica and Puerto Rico.

Move CEO Phil Rodriguez says the partnership “brings two companies together that complement each other. I have full respect for what Nelson has built over the years, and for his drive and vision. He’s building a great team and we share the same ethos: quality before quantity.”

Loud and Live’s entertainment division has produced and managed national tours, festivals and concerts in the United States, working with the likes of Pitbull, Ricky Martin, Chainsmokers, Steve Aoki, Luis Fonsi, Calvin Harris, Roberto Carlos (pictured), Juan Luis Guerra and Franco De Vita.

“t’s a genuine pleasure to be partnering with such an experienced and highly-regarded industry veteran”

“I admire Phil for what he has built and accomplished, and it’s a genuine pleasure to be partnering with such an experienced and highly-regarded industry veteran,” comments Nelson Albareda, CEO of Loud And Live. “We’re looking forward to building off our individual successes in North and South America, as we come together to be a leader in live entertainment across the Americas.”

“We’re extremely proud and excited to be joining forces with Move, and ultimately to leverage our respective resources and capabilities to provide a broader service offering and experience to artists, sponsors and fans,” adds Albareda.

In addition to collaborating on live entertainment content, the JV will be offering brands sponsorship opportunities around live events across the region.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

LatAm associations draft gender equality declaration

Musicians’ unions across Latin America have drafted and signed a declaration pledging to work towards gender parity in their memberships.

At an event hosted by the International Federation of Musicians (FIM) in Bogota, Colombia, before Christmas, local artists’ union Ormúsica, as well as its counterparts in Uruguay (Audem and Fudem), Argentina (Sadem), Peru (SIMCCAP), Panama (Sitmas), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Sindmusi), Mexico (SUTM), Cuba (UNEAC) and Costa Rica (UTM), put their names to a document committing to achieving a 50-50 gender split among their members, with 30% women by 2025.

The declaration, entitled Declaración sobre equidad de género en el sector musical sindical (Declaration on gender equality in the musical union sector), also commits the signatories to undertaking an annual census of their memberships to assess the progress made towards gender equality.

In a statement, FIM, which represents some 70 musicians’ unions globally, thanked Ormúsica “for their warm welcome to a successful event”.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Live Nation acquires Argentina’s DF Entertainment

Live Nation has found time for one further corporate takeover before the year’s end, capping off its most acquisition-heavy 12 months to date by buying a majority stake in Argentine promoter DF Entertainment.

Buenos Aires-based DF, founded in August 2015 by veteran concert promoter Diego Finkelstein, sold more than 500,000 tickets to its concerts and festivals in 2018. The company has worked with Live Nation on several co-promotions over the past three years, including shows by Coldplay, Bon Jovi, Foo Fighters, Ariana Grande and Phil Collins.

In partnership with Live Nation-owned C3 Presents, DF Entertainment is also the promoter and ticketing provider of the local edition of Live Nation’s Lollapalooza festival, Lollapalooza Argentina.

The DF deal, terms of which were not disclosed, is Live Nation’s 16th acquisition or equivalent this year, following Mainland Music earlier this month.

“The demand for concerts and live events across South America has never been higher”

“The demand for concerts and live events across South America has never been higher, and the local insight of Diego and the DF Entertainment team will help us connect more artists and fans throughout Argentina than ever before,” says Live Nation’s president and CEO, Michael Rapino.

“DF Entertainment has proven to be an amazing partner and the premier promoter in Argentina, and we’re glad to have them join the Live Nation family after many years working together.”

“Argentina’s live music industry continues to flourish, and together with Live Nation, so will DF Entertainment,” adds Finkelstein. “I’m very proud of our team and can’t wait to see our event line-up grow even more with the support and resources of Live Nation behind us.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Phil harmonic: 40 years of Phil Rodriguez

Every great career starts somewhere, and usually it’s somewhere ignominious.

With Phil Rodriguez, for 40 years the Latin American tour guide, cultural translator and problem-solver for artists from The Ramones to Guns N’ Roses to Ed Sheeran, the difference is that he freely admits it.

In his case, it was 1977 with Joe Cocker – Rodriguez’s first tour as a promoter. Problems piled up along the route: an angry Mexican promoter confiscated the band’s passports; the Brazilian sound systems, cobbled together from three suppliers, were horrendously out of phase. By his own account, Rodriguez was an innocent, barely hanging on amid the madness.

“In a hotel in Buenos Aires, I walked in on Joe’s manager – Michael Lang of Woodstock fame – talking about me on the phone, saying, ‘the kid is way out of his depth.’ The patience he had with me was incredible.”

Rodriguez’s best stories – legendary among those who consider him a friend or ally – tend to have quality ingredients: high-stakes shows in heady Latin American cities; famous rock stars enjoying rock-star “pursuits”; currency headaches, nightmarish infrastructures, dangerously prickly military regimes; and a promoter in the thick of things, grappling with it all in a continent where you get nothing on a plate.

“Unlike America, Canada, Europe, England, where there’s a minor league, we never had that in South America. So you had to learn by banging your head against the wall, busting your ass”

“The big, important thing to note,” says Rodriguez, in defense of his early mishaps, “is that, unlike America, Canada, Europe, England, where there’s a minor league – a system for you to learn your trade, do your apprenticeship – we never had that in South America. So you had to learn by banging your head against the wall, busting your ass.”

When Rodriguez came into the South American live business – “I fell ass-backwards into it,” he specifies – it was through a combination of ambition, circumstance and sheer naivety. In those days, there was barely a wall to bang your head against – just a big, wild mass of territories where British and American bands simply didn’t go.

Today, they go there in droves, though that exotic quality remains, and agents and managers queue up to sing the praises of a man who has done more than perhaps any other to pave the road from the English-language markets down to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru and other key 21st century touring spots.

Ed Sheeran manager Stuart Camp says he couldn’t imagine operating in Latin America without him. Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme emails to compare Rodriguez to Michael Douglas in Romancing the Stone. Others bluntly credit Rodriguez with carving out a market that didn’t exist when he arrived and now ranks as a staple of the global business.

“He literally is the pioneer in South America,” says CAA agent Chris Dalston. “He did it before everybody else did, and he is the one who stayed around longer than everyone else.”

 


Continue reading this feature in the digital edition of IQ 74:

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

AEG announces Antel Arena, first venue in Uruguay

Uruguayan telco Antel has appointed AEG Facilities to operate and manage its 10,000-seat Antel Arena in Montevideo, set to open in mid-2018.

AEG’s large venues division will initially oversee the project from its office in Sao Paulo, and ultimately be responsible for all aspects of the arena’s operations, including hiring and training staff, sponsorship and premium seating sales, booking, security, ticketing, guest services, marketing, public relations, finance, human resources and overall event management.

The venue will host concerts, family shows, festivals and corporate events, complementing a raft of sports programming, including basketball, tennis and futsal (like football, but played indoors on a hard court).

“This new state-of-the-art arena is destined to be the home of the most important sports, music and entertainment events, fairs and conventions,” comments Antel CEO Javier Emicuri. “Our goal for this venue is to provide Uruguay with the best infrastructure to become a reference place in South America to host these major events, and with a strong partner like AEG at our side we are confident we will achieve this.”

“Antel Arena will immediately take its place at the head of the class for indoor venues in South America”

Chuck Steedman, AEG Facilities’ chief operating officer – who also joins the Antel board of directors – adds: “We applaud Antel and the government of Uruguay for designing and building this great indoor arena. Antel Arena will immediately take its place at the head of the class for indoor venues in South America and will set the standard for excellence on the continent.

“We are thankful for the opportunity to work with Antel and the people of Uruguay to provide the best in world-class sports and entertainment.”

AEG’s taking over Antel Arena follows a busy few months for the company, which is also undertaking new projects in Switzerland, Nashville and Stockholm.

AEG expands European footprint with Lausanne deal

Leading AEG Facilities’ team in South America is Venancio Castro, who joined the company in 2014 as executive director.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Alexandre Faria to spearhead LN Brazil launch

Responding to what it calls a “growing demand for live events throughout Latin America”, Live Nation has announced its expansion into Brazil under Alexandre Faria Fernandes, who joins as director and senior vice-president of talent buying.

Faria was previously chief entertainment officer at Time for Fun (T4F), South America’s leading regional promoter, which he left earlier this month, replaced by Planmusic founder Luiz Oscar Niemeyer. In 17 years at T4F (previously CIE Brasil), Faria worked on tours for U2, Foo Fighters, Coldplay, One Direction and Madonna and festivals including Lollapalooza Brasil and Electric Daisy Carnival.

At Live Nation Faria will report into Bruce Moran, the company’s president of Latin America. In his new role, he will focus on booking and promoting shows for major acts visiting Brazil, the continent’s largest live entertainment market.

“Cities throughout Brazil are becoming key tour stops as more global artists visit their fans in Latin America”

“I’m excited to join the Live Nation Latin America team during a time with so much opportunity and development,” he comments Faria. “Together, we will bring the people of Brazil and Latin America stand-out performances from international artists, as well as local talent.”

Moran adds: “Cities throughout Brazil are becoming key tour stops as more global artists visit their fans in Latin America. The knowledge, relationships and passion Alexandre Faria displays for promotion makes him a great asset to Live Nation as we continue to expand concert offerings to meet growing demand across Brazil.”

Shows produced by Live Nation Latin America in 2017 include Coldplay, U2, Bruno Mars, Ariana Grande, Sting, Metallica, Paul McCartneyJustin Bieber and Bon Jovi.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.