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One killed in shooting outside Berlin’s Tempodrom

One has been killed and four others injured following a shooting outside Berlin music venue the Tempodrom, on Friday night (14 February).

The incident took place in the square in front of the 4,200-capacity venue around 11 p.m. on Friday, as a Turkish comedy show, Güldür Güldür, was taking place inside.

Berlin police posted the following statement: “According to initial findings, unknown assailants fired shots outside the building, causing one person to die and three others to be injured. The perpetrators are fleeing.”

It was later confirmed that a fourth person was injured.

Berlin’s public prosecutor’s office and the Berlin police are investigating the incident.

IQ has contacted the Tempodrom for comment.

 


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Two killed in Texas music venue shooting

Two people were killed and at least five injured in a shooting during a concert at the Ventura in San Antonio, Texas, on Sunday night (19 January).

Police were called to the music venue at 8 p.m. last night, after a gunman opened fire inside the club. According to San Antonio police chief William McManus, the shooting occurred after an argument broke out in bar.

The concert, dubbed ‘Living the Dream’, featured multiple emerging acts and local musicians including Jonathan Tyler, Hoax and MikeNo$leep.

The shooting prompted a mixed reaction on the venue’s Facebook page, with some users defending the bar as “an excellent spot for up-and-coming musicians” and stating that similar issues had never occurred before. Others criticised the venue for a perceived lack of security enforcement.

A police search for the gunman is ongoing.

 


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Three wounded in post-concert shooting

Three people were wounded in a shooting following a concert by Los Angeles rap group Shoreline Mafia in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The gunshots were fired as the three victims left multi-room music venue the Complex on Friday evening (22 November). It is believed they had attended the concert, which took place in the Complex’s 2,500-capacity Rockwell venue.

All victims, two adults and one minor, are expected to survive.

According to Salt Lake City police officer Carlos Valencia, the two adult victims had engaged in a verbal confrontation inside the venue, although no connection to the shooting has been confirmed.

Shoreline Mafia’s 2019 tour has seen them play across the United States and Europe, with shows in Germany, Austria, France, the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Finland, Sweden and Denmark.

The group is now embarking on the Australian leg of the tour, appearing at Brisbane’s Wildlands festival (28,000-cap.), Beyond the Valley (16,000-cap.) in Victoria, Perth’s Origen Fields (15,000-cap.) and Field Day (20,000-cap.) in Sydney.

 


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MGM to pay $735m to Route 91 shooting victims

Hotel operator MGM Resorts International has reached a settlement of between US$735 million and $800m with the victims and survivors of the 2017 shooting at Route 91 Harvest festival (22,000-cap.) in Las Vegas.

According to Las Vegas law firm Eglet Adams, the final amount of the settlement is dependent on how many claimants come forward.

MGM subsidiary Mandalay Corps owns the Mandalay Bay hotel, from where gunman Stephen Paddock killed 58 and wounded a further 422 people attending the open-air country music festival in October 2017. A further 800 festivalgoers were injured in the panic following the shooting.

Hundreds of law suits have since been filed against the hotel giant, which also owns the venue at which the festival was taking place.

“Today’s agreement marks a milestone in the recovery process for the victims of the horrifying events of 1 October,” says attorney Robert Eglet, whose firm represents almost 2,500 victims of the massacre.

“While nothing will be able to bring back the lives lost or undo the horrors so many suffered on that day, this settlement will provide fair compensation for thousands of victims and their families.”

“While nothing will be able to bring back the lives lost or undo the horrors so many suffered on that day, this settlement will provide fair compensation for thousands of victims and their families”

“We hope this resolution will provide some sense of closure to our clients,” adds fellow attorney Mo Aziz, a partner at Abraham, Watkins, Nichols, Sorrels, Agosto & Azi, which represents more than 1,300 victims and survivors. “In this era of mass shootings, this settlement sends a strong message to the hospitality industry that all steps necessary to prevent mass shootings must be taken.”

MGM Resorts chairman and CEO Jim Murren, who says the deals represents “good corporate citizenship” on his company’s behalf, says, “our goal has always been to resolve these matters so our community and the victims and their families can move forward in the healing process.

“This agreement with the plaintiffs’ counsel is a major step, and one that we hoped for a long time would be possible.”

MGM Resorts had previously filed its own litigation against the victims in a bid to avoid liability. This settlement does not act as an admission of liability.

An IQ timeline of terror attacks at live music events and festivals predating the Las Vegas massacre is available here.

Anti-terrorism efforts at live events will form one focus of discussions at the Event Safety and Security Summit (E3S) on 8 October.

 


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Khalid headlines concert for El Paso victims

Texan singer Khalid is headlining a Live Nation-promoted benefit concert in aid of the victims of the mass shooting in his hometown of El Paso, on 3 August 2019.

Special guests will also perform at the concert in the Don Haskins Centre (12,567-cap.) in El Paso, Texas on 1 September. Proceeds from the event will support the El Paso Shooting Victims’ Fund and the El Paso Community Foundation.

“I have been rocked to the core by the horrific act of gun violence that came to El Paso, and by the continued acts of senseless violence that our country faces daily,” says Khalid.

“I want to give back to my community of El Paso, who ha[ve] given so much to me. Let’s heal together through music while raising money to help those who need it.”

“I have been rocked to the core by the horrific act of gun violence that came to El Paso”

Music industry columnist Bob Lefsetz has also been discussing ideas for staging benefit concerts for gun control in the United States. At least 62 people have been killed in mass shootings in the US this year alone.

Tickets for the Khalid concert will go on sale on Wednesday 14 August at 10 a.m. local time (MT), available via the Live Nation website.

In addition to attending the concert, donations for the cause can be made directly through the Great Khalid Foundation or by purchasing one of the commemorative shirts here.

The event will also be presented by the Right Hand Foundation, founded by Khalid’s manager Courtney Stewart.

 


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Multiple injuries in volatile US festival weekend

Two people have died and dozens were injured in a turbulent festival weekend in the United States.

At least 22 people were hurt in the early hours of yesterday morning after a gunman opened fire at a 24-hours arts festival in Trenton, New Jersey. Witnesses told TV station WPVI that attendees at Art All Night Trenton initially mistook the gunfire, which occurred at around 2.45 am on Sunday 17 June, for the sound of fireworks. “All of a sudden, my brother goes to me, ‘You hear that gunfire?’,” said local resident Angelo Nicolo. “I go, ‘It sounds like fireworks.’ He said, ‘No, that’s gunfire.’

“Next thing you know, we turn around and everybody’s running down the street. All hell broke loose.”

Around 1,000 people were believed to have been at the festival, held at the historic Roebling Wire Works venue in south Trenton, at the time of the shooting.

Police said the incident appeared to be part of a gang dispute and not related to terrorism. The suspected perpetrator, 33-year-old Tahaij Wells, who had just been released from prison, was killed by police officers.

Four victims were were left in a critical condition as a result of their wounds, said prosecutor Angelo Onofri – although three of them, including a 13-year-old boy, have, as of this morning, been upgraded to stable. The last person in critical condition is believed to be a suspect, while a 23-year-old man, Amir Armstrong, is in police custody on suspicion of firearms offences.

Attendees at Art All Night-Trenton initially mistook the gunfire for the sound of fireworks

In western Colorado, police are investigating after a man shot himself in the stomach – apparently by accident – at a country music festival in Mesa County.

The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel reports that the 30-year-old man shot himself on Friday evening while attending the Country Jam festival, promoted by Townsquare/Madison Square Garden Company.

The shooting was an isolated incident, according to Mesa County sheriff’s office spokeswoman Megan Terlecky. “We believe it was accidental, but we’re still investigating,” she said, adding sheriffs are looking into how the gun came to be at the festival, which prohibits firearms and searches all bags.

Meanwhile, at Red Frog Events/Goldenvoice’s Firefly Music Festival – which has taken place at Dover International Speedway, in Dover, Delaware, since 2012 – a 20-year-old woman died after being found unresponsive in the campsite early on Sunday morning.

According to WDEL-FM, the cause of 20-year-old Caroline Friedman’s death is not yet down, but authorities have largely ruled out foul play.

Arctic Monkeys, Eminem and Kendrick Lamar headlined Firefly 2018, which ran from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 June.

 


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Route 91 Harvest festivalgoers sue for refunds

Two Route 91 Harvest 2017 ticket-buyers have filed a class-action lawsuit to secure ticket refunds for all 22,000 people who attended the three-day Las Vegas festival, which was rocked by a mass shooting that left 59 people dead.

Several festivalgoers have already received refunds after asking for them, according to Texas lawyer Craig Eigland, who says the suit – filed in southern California by a team that also includes the couple’s solicitor, Mark Robinson – aims to recoup the ticket money of everyone who attended from promoter Live Nation.

“As we were interviewing several hundred of our clients, we realised some had received refunds and some had not,” he tells Fox News. “It didn’t matter if they were family members of deceased, gunshot victims or traumatised because of the shooting and their escape.

“We decided to make one demand on behalf of everyone”

“The only factor was that those that heard about a refund through Facebook or friends, and demanded a refund, got it. So we decided to make one demand on behalf of everyone.”

The shooting, the deadliest in US history, was followed by a plethora of lawsuits, including two against Slide Fire Solutions – the manufacturer of the ‘bump stock’ device that allowed shooter Stephen Paddock to achieve simulated automatic fire from semi-auto weapons – and several targeting Live Nation and MGM Resorts for alleged negligence.

Live Nation does not comment on pending litigation.

 


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Route 91 Harvest litigation mounts up with new CA suits

Promoter Live Nation and hotel operator MGM Resorts have been slapped with another five lawsuits by the victims of the Route 91 Harvest mass shooting.

The five new suits, which also target the estate of shooter Stephen Paddock, have been filed in Los Angeles superior court, and follow the previously reported complaints lodged with courts in Nevada.

The largest of the lawsuits, reports news agency Reuters, was filed on behalf of 450 people who were either injured in or witnessed the shooting at the Las Vegas country music festival, which also left 59 people, including Paddock, dead. The other four, meanwhile, were brought by families of people who were killed or severely injured.

Similar to the Nevada suits – one of which, by shooting victim Paige Gasper, has now been withdrawn in favour of the lawsuit filed in California, where Live Nation is headquartered – the victims accuse MGM Resorts and its subsidiary, Mandalay Corp, which owns the hotel, of failing to properly monitor Paddock’s activities, train staff members and employ adequate security measures.

The five new suits, which also target the estate of shooter Stephen Paddock, have been filed in Los Angeles superior court

Live Nation is accused of negligence for “failing to provide adequate exits and properly train staff for an emergency”.

A court hearing on who will be appointed to administer Paddock’s estate is scheduled for 7 December.

Interestingly, while two of the Nevada lawsuits targeted Slide Fire Solutions, which manufactured the ‘bump stock’ device that allowed Paddock to achieve simulated automatic fire from semi-auto weapons, Slide Fire is not named in California, as lawyer Muhammad Aziz says most of his clients support the right to bear arms. “We want to focus on hotel and venue security, not turn this into a gun rights case,” he comments.

Live Nation does not comment on pending litigation.

 


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Route 91 suits take aim at MGM, LN, bump-stock mfr

Those affected by last week’s mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas have begun seeking legal redress, with at least three separate lawsuits so far filed in US courts.

The most prominent individual suit – filed on behalf of Paige Gaisper, a 21-year-old Californian student who was shot in the underarm during the attack, which left more than 59 dead – names Live Nation, the promoter of the event; MGM Resorts, which owns the Mandalay Bay resort from where the shooter fired on concertgoers; and Slide Fire Solutions, which manufactured the ‘bump stock’ device that allowed him to achieve simulated automatic fire from semi-auto weapons.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Gasper’s complaint accuses MGM Resorts of “breach[ing] their duty of reasonable care” by failing to stop the gunman, Stephen Paddock, from bringing a cache of weapons into the hotel. She also alleges the company’s employees failed to respond quickly enough to the threat posed by Paddock, something MGM denies.

Live Nation, meanwhile, allegedly failed to “design, build and mark adequate exits in case of emergency” and “properly train and supervise employees in an appropriate plan of action in case of an emergency”.

Paige Gaisper, who was shot in the underarm, is suing MGM Resorts, Live Nation and bump-stock manufacturer Slide Fire

A second lawsuit – filed, like Gasper’s, in Clark County district court in Nevada – on behalf of all festivalgoers by gun-control group Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence also takes aim at Slide Fire.

A third complaint, brought by the family of John Phippen, who died in the attack, petitions a judge to appoint a special administrator to take over Paddock’s estate.

Several enterprising law firms, meanwhile – as was the case after Fyre Festival – have begun actively soliciting new lawsuits by taking out sponsored ads on Google, with one, California’s Oaks Law Firm, registering the domain vegaslawsuit.com:

Route 91 sponsored lawsuit ads

YouTube agreed earlier this week to remove videos showing how to attack bump stocks, which work by using recoil to simulate fully automatic fire, to guns. “We have long had a policy against harmful and dangerous content,” said a spokesperson in a statement. “In the wake of the recent tragedy in Las Vegas, we have taken a closer look at videos that demonstrate how to convert firearms to make them fire more quickly and we’ve expanded our existing policy to prohibit these videos.”

Several artists, including Jennifer Lopez and Jason Aldean, cancelled planned shows in Vegas in the aftermath of the attack. Others, such as Celine Dion, Billy Idol and John Fogerty, opted instead to play as normal, with Fogerty saying live music has a “way of healing, and that is what we will do: come together and heal. We can’t let fear control our lives.”

 


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A week on, music returns to the City of Lights

One week on from the murder of 58 patrons of country music festival Route 91 Harvest, Las Vegas is returning to normality, with a string of emotionally charged performances by major artists helping the city to recover from the worst mass shooting in US history.

As expected, there were several cancellations in the wake of the attack – which saw gunman Stephen Paddock open fire on the open-air festival from the 32nd floor of the nearby Mandalay Bay hotel, killing 59 people, including himself, in the early hours of Monday morning – with Jennifer Lopez, Blue Man Group and Jason Aldean, who was performing at the time of the shooting, among those to call off scheduled shows.

However, Celine Dion, who is midway through an eight-year residency at the Colosseum at Caesars Palace (4,298-cap.), bucked the trend, returning to the stage on Tuesday night. Standing in front a screen reading “#VegasStrong”, the Canadian singer told the audience she had toyed with the idea of cancellation but ultimately decided to donate the proceeds of the concert to victims.

“On Sunday we lost too many beautiful, innocent souls, and so many are still suffering,” she said. “But tonight we’re going to let these families know that we are supporting them and that we will help them through their tragic loss.”

She continued: “We dedicate tonight’s show to all of the victims and their families, and to the first responders, and to the doctors and nurses who are working around the clock to save lives and to so many heroes who did whatever they could to help complete strangers in a time of desperate need.”

“Las Vegas returned almost immediately to its high-glitz version of normal … The shows go on”

Other performers opting to go ahead with planned shows included Billy Idol, who played the first night of his residency at House of Blues (1,800-cap.) on Wednesday, John Fogerty, who played the Encore Theatre (1,490-cap.) the same night, and Pete Yorn, who performed at the Beauty Bar (300-cap.) last Friday, additionally paying tribute to the late Tom Petty by opening with ‘I Won’t Back Down’.

Echoing the sentiments expressed after the Bataclan and Manchester Arena attacks, all emphasised the need for life to go on as normal and for live music to not be cowed be terrorism. “They can’t break me,” said Idol, “and they can’t break Las Vegas”, while Fogerty spoke of music having a “way of healing, and that is what we will do: come together and heal. We can’t let fear control our lives.”

Britney Spears, meanwhile, has confirmed she will continue her residency at the Axis at Planet Hollywood (7,000-cap.), saying she and the city will “get through this together”; Aldean, too, has returned to the site of the attack, meeting hospitalised survivors of the shooting after dedicating his performance Saturday Night Live the previous day to the city.

Figures from across the live music industry last week responded to the attack, with Route 91 Harvest promoter Live Nation, Canadian association Music Canada Live and Outside Lands organiser Superfly among those to have paid tribute to the victims.

“We are heartbroken”: Industry reacts to Route 91 tragedy

Revellers appear to have responded to performers’ faith in the city: According to local paper the Santa Fe New Mexican, Vegas has “returned almost immediately to its high-glitz version of normal after Sunday’s massacre of 58 people, the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. The shows go on. The roulette wheels spin, the dice fly and people carrying Coronas wander the strip alongside bubbly showgirls and a guy dressed as Chewbacca.”

But if the thrill-seekers of Las Vegas have already put Monday’s tragedy behind them, the nature of the attack – on an open-air festival, as opposed to the enclosed space of a venue or arena – is weighing more heavily on the minds of US festivalgoers. Raelene Wentz, who attended last weekend’s Desert Oasis festival in Indio, California, says had she not already bought tickets, she might have reconsidered attending – “We’re here and we already have the tickets,” she tells the Desert Sun. “[But] we’re definitely aware of where all the exits are” – while another, Rachel Livingstone, describes having “apprehension” about attending the event.

At Austin City Limits in Texas, meanwhile, “many fans and musicians acknowledged that the potential of a Las Vegas-style copycat had crossed their minds”, reports the The New York Times – although, at both festivals, the consensus seemed to be that to live in terror is to hand victory to terrorists. “I’m kind of the opinion things like that shouldn’t change your life,” says City Limits-goer Tyler Costolo. “At that point, you’re letting those kinds of things win.”

By number of concerts, Las Vegas is the sixth-biggest city in the US for live music, and the eighth in the world.

 


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