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Travis Scott pyramids concert officially cancelled

After weeks of speculation, Travis Scott’s scheduled concert in front of the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt has been officially cancelled.

The Live Nation-promoted event was set to take place tomorrow (28 July) at the Sound and Light area, with an estimated 200 million people tuning into the live stream.

However, last week Egypt’s state-affiliated Musicians Syndicate said that it would revoke a permit for the Utopia show because it “contradicts the identity of the Egyptian culture”.

While the concert’s promoters and Scott himself had insisted the performance would go ahead, Live Nation Middle East published a statement last night (26 July) confirming the cancellation.

“We regret to inform you that the Utopia show, originally scheduled for 28 July at the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt, is cancelled,” it said. “Unfortunately, despite best efforts, complex production issues meant that the show could not be constructed in the desert. We understand that this news is disappointing and not the outcome any of us desired.”

“Unfortunately, despite best efforts, complex production issues meant that the show could not be constructed in the desert”

Meanwhile, Scott declared on social media that the shows would still take place in the future: “Egypt at the pyramids will happen but due to demand and detail logistics they just need a bit of time to set lay on lands. I will keep u posted on a date which will be soon.”

Scott also added that he was scheduling four more “of these type of experiences” in different locations.

A spokesperson for the Syndicate of Musical Professions exclusively told Al-Masry Al-Youm that the decision was made following deaths that took place in Travis Scott’s previous concerts.

“The syndicate is not against tourism, but against any party that poses a threat to the lives of Egyptians,” he stressed, noting that Jennifer Lopez earlier held a very successful concert in Egypt.

Abdullah added that the local promoter and ticketer for the concert, Ticketsmarche, paid LE300,000 to obtain permits for the concert which will be refunded following the cancellation.

The Ticketsmarche CEO earlier this week said his company has agreed on 10 concerts with renowned international artists in Egypt for the coming months but said they are unlikely to take place if Scott’s concert was cancelled.

Days ago, it was announced that Palm Tree Music Festival, founded by Norwegian producer Kygo and his manager Myles Shear, will be exported to the Pyramids. Other acts that have previously performed at the location include Maroon 5 (2022), Black Eyed Peas (2021) and Red Hot Chili Peppers (2019).

 


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Confusion reigns over Travis Scott pyramids concert

With just days to go until Travis Scott’s scheduled concert in front of the Pyramids of Giza, it is still unclear as to whether the livestreamed performance can take place.

The Live Nation-promoted event, set for this Friday (28 July), has been shrouded in controversy after Egypt’s state-affiliated Musicians Syndicate claimed it was cancelling the licence it issued “to ensure the safety and protection of the audience”.

On 18 July, the Musicians Syndicate said the sold-out concert, scheduled to take place in the Sound and Light area near the pyramid complex, would not be permitted due to “the artist’s positions, images and documented information on the strange rituals he practises, which go against our traditions”.

“The artist’s positions, images and documented information on the strange rituals he practises go against our traditions”

“While the Musicians Syndicate has welcomed various art forms and concerts in recent months, it has set conditions and regulations to safeguard the customs and traditions inherited by the Egyptian people,” said Dr Mohamed Abdullah, in a statement on behalf of the Musicians Syndicate.

“After examining social media opinions and feedback, as well as the news circulating on search engines and social media platforms, which included authenticated images and information about peculiar rituals performed by the star during his performance, contradicting our authentic societal values and traditions, the syndicate’s president and board of directors have decided to cancel the licence issued for hosting this type of concert, which goes against the cultural identity of the Egyptian people.”

Scott hit back in an open letter, saying that such images and information were “bot generated” and “fake information”.

Later that day, Live Nation Middle East maintained that the concert, in support of Scott’s forthcoming album Utopia, was going ahead: “There have been no changes to Travis Scott’s show in Egypt, any reports to the contrary are false. We can’t wait to celebrate Utopia with you in Egypt!”

Confusion deepened when local promoter and ticketer for the concert, Ticketsmarche, days later said Scott’s equipment was seized and the organisers were prevented from entering the pyramids area.

The company’s CEO Mohamed Serag told local media at the time that the concert’s fate was unknown. “We do not know what we will do, especially if the last date for the equipment to enter was Wednesday. However, nothing new has happened given that most state institutions are on official leave until Sunday.

“We have all the permits and we do not know the reason for preventing the entry of the equipment, especially since the Egyptian Musicians Syndicate does not have the authority to cancel the concert, nor does it have the power to prevent the entry of the equipment. It also made it clear that the whole matter is in the hands of the authorities.”

Serag said that the size of the initial losses of cancelling the concert would amount to approximately LE 300 million (€8.7m)

Serag told the Egypt Independent that the size of the initial losses of cancelling the concert would amount to approximately LE 300 million (€8.7m).

However, Serag remains hopeful the Tourism Ministry will give the concert the green light, and Scott has continued to promote the concert on his social media channels. “Love ya more can’t wait to see ya in Utopia,” he tweeted nine hours ago.

If the concert goes ahead it would be broadcast live to about 200 million people, which would be an unprecedented promotion for the pyramids area and Egyptian tourism, said Serag.

He added that about 4,000 confirmed tickets have been booked by foreigners coming, each of whom will stay for at least a week, which means 28,000 nights in Egyptian hotels, all of which will be in foreign currency, which could constitute great profits for the tourism sector in Egypt.

The Ticketsmarche CEO also said his company has agreed on 10 concerts with renowned international artists in Egypt for the coming months but says they are unlikely to take place if Scott’s concert is cancelled.

Days ago, it was announced that Palm Tree Music Festival, founded by Norwegian producer Kygo and his manager Myles Shear, will be exported to the Pyramids. Other acts that have previously performed at the location include Maroon 5 (2022), Black Eyed Peas (2021) and Red Hot Chili Peppers (2019).

 


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Travis Scott to livestream gig from Pyramids of Giza

Travis Scott is planning a performance in front of the ancient Pyramids of Giza in Egypt, in support of his forthcoming album.

Tickets for the Live Nation-promoted event, which will also be live-streamed at 9 pm on 28 July, sold out in 15 minutes.

Premium tickets were priced at EGP 4,000 (USD 129) while VIP tickets were sold for EGP 6,500 (USD 210).

The performance will see Scott premiere Utopia, his first studio album in five years and the first since the deadly crowd crush at his festival Astroworld.

Premium tickets were priced at EGP 4,000 (USD 129) while VIP tickets were sold for EGP 6,500 (USD 210).

Ten concertgoers, aged between nine and 27, died following a crowd surge during Travis Scott’s headline set at NRG Park in Houston, Texas in November 2021. The 50,000-cap festival was promoted by Live Nation and Austin-based Scoremore.

At the end of last month, a Texas grand jury issued six no-bills related to the deaths, meaning that no criminal charges will be filed.

Scott, Live Nation and Scoremore reportedly still face numerous civil lawsuits accusing them of negligence, wrongful death and more.

 

 

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