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Safer Crowds, Safer Venues rolls out in UK

A group of live music-related associations has unveiled a comprehensive best practice guide for crowd management in smaller performance spaces and licensed venues across the United Kingdom.

In response to incidents that have resulted in loss of life or serious injury at events, the UK Crowd Management Association (UKCMA), Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), LIVE, and UK Door Security Association have been working alongside experts and key stakeholders from the industry to publish the Safer Crowds, Safer Venues guidance.

The initiative aims to provide the operators of venues below arena size, event organisers, and their stakeholders with a general outline of accepted good practice in crowd management, filling a crucial gap in safety protocols for the smaller venue circuit.

The guide – a culmination of insights from experienced individuals within the industry – offers valuable perspectives tailored to ensure the safety, security, and optimal experience of attendees, as well as looking after the welfare of the staff working on events in the venues that host them.

“This guide represents a milestone in our collective efforts to prioritise safety and well-being in performance and licensed spaces.”

“The tragic incidents in recent years underscore the critical need for standardised and effective crowd management practices,” says Anne Marie Chebib, spokesperson for the UKCMA. “This guide represents a milestone in our collective efforts to prioritise safety and well-being in performance and licensed spaces.”

The 76-page guide is available as a free download from the safercrowdssafervenues.com website. It addresses various aspects of crowd management, including risk assessment, planning processes, stakeholder engagement, and considerations for different types of venues and events. It emphasises the importance of proactive measures and diligent planning to mitigate potential risks, recognising that strategies may vary depending on the nature of the event and venue.

“While this document serves as a valuable resource, it is important to recognise that it does not replace regulatory tools or official guidance,” notes Michael Kill of the NTIA. “Instead, it complements existing frameworks by offering practical insights and recommendations based on industry expertise.”

The guide encompasses a wide range of indoor venues, including concert halls, theatres, nightclubs, bars, pubs, restaurants, and comedy clubs hosting cultural and entertainment events. However, it excludes arenas over 5,000 seated capacity, outdoor events, and sports grounds, which are covered by separate guidelines.

“By adhering to the principles outlined in this guide, operators can ensure the safety of patrons and staff…”

“Effective crowd management is fundamental to the success and sustainability of any venue or event,” said Eric Stuart, former chair of the UKCMA. “By adhering to the principles outlined in this guide, operators can ensure the safety of patrons and staff while fostering a vibrant and inclusive atmosphere.”

The publication of Safer Crowds, Safer Venues marks an important step forward in enhancing safety standards across the UK’s entertainment and hospitality sectors. But while it provides valuable insights, users are also encouraged to seek legal advice and consider statutory duties in conjunction with the guidance provided.

Jon Collins CEO of LIVE adds, “At the heart of every venue is the promise of unforgettable experiences, a commitment to the joy and safety of every individual who walks through its doors. The launch of Safer Crowds, Safer Venues offers timely support in the vitally important area of crowd management to those small and medium size venues previously underserved in this area. Its content, prepared by a team of dedicated and expert volunteers, will underpin the delivery of safer events across the UK. LIVE commends this work and the contributions made by UKCMA and NTIA.”

 


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The Great Escape unveils first speakers for 2024

The Great Escape (TGE) conference has announced its themes and first guest speakers for its revamped 2024 edition.

The UK music industry event returns to Brighton from Wednesday 15 May to Saturday 18 May, with the Council of Music Makers (CMM), The Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), BBC Introducing and Youth Music each set to curate a day of the programme.

Confirmed speakers include Lauren Mayberry (Chvrches), Parklife and The Warehouse Project co-founder Sacha Lord, who is also night time economy adviser for Greater Manchester and chair of the Night Time Industries Association, and the They Think It’s All Sober podcast.

In the second room, The Great Escape’s partners will host panels including TikTok x Ticketmaster, The Spanish Wave, Audio Network, BPI, Pollstar, and Music Declares Emergency.

TGE has also announced the return of the Steve Strange Award for its third year. Introduced in honour of the late live agent and X-Ray Touring co-founder, the award recognises a music act that is breaking through creative boundaries. The recipient, who will receive a cash prize of £5,000, will be revealed on Monday 20 May.

“The scope of what’s going to be covered is more in depth and bigger and better than ever”

“We’re incredibly excited for how this brand new evolution of The Great Escape conference is shaping up,” says Rory Bett, CEO of organiser MAMA Festivals. “By bringing in some of the industry’s biggest and best networks and experts to develop the event, the scope of what’s going to be covered is more in depth and bigger and better than ever. This is the UK’s number one event for networking and getting ahead in the music industry like you’ve never seen it before.”

On 16 May, the CMM, the umbrella organisation representing the Ivors Academy, Featured Artists Coalition, Music Managers Forum, MPG and the Musicians’ Union, will cover key areas for people working in the business of music creation

The following day, the NTIA will provide a deep dive into the night time economy and current the state of play for venues and live entertainment. Then, on 18 May, BBC Introducing and Youth Music will focus on professional development for the next generation of emerging artists and entrepreneurs.

Saturday will also feature partner panels hosted by AudioActive, an organisation creating social change through music, and educational event platform THEFUTUREIS.

New for 2024, TGE has launched a brand-new Saturday-only conference ticket for £35, with a Saturday conference & festival combo ticket priced £75.

 


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Skiddle announces promoter bursary scheme return

UK ticketing firm and live events website Skiddle has announced the return of its promoter bursary scheme to support the next generation of party promoters.

The Skiddle Promoter Fund, which is supported by the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), will be awarded to event organisers specifically running student-focused events in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Each applicant can bid for a grant of up to £1,000 to help organise a student-centred event in either September or October 2023.

Successful applicants will also be able to benefit from advice on launch strategies, key sales dates and marketing/ticketing knowledge. Promoters can register their interest in the bursary here by the 31 July deadline.

“We are thrilled to announce the return of the Skiddle Promoter Fund, in collaboration with the NTIA,” says Skiddle senior marketing manager Lisa Braithwaite. “Having been in the industry for over 20 years, it is very important to us to ensure the continuity of events and night-time culture across the UK.

“Supporting new promoters is what Skiddle is all about, and we’re excited to see what ideas and concepts come out of this student-focused bursary scheme”

“Supporting new promoters is what Skiddle is all about, and we’re excited to see what ideas and concepts come out of this student-focused bursary scheme. The deadline is fast approaching so be sure to get in your application now to ensure you’re in with a chance of getting some money to put towards your event.”

Those who are chosen to receive the bursary will be contacted via email.

“We are extremely excited to announce our collaboration with Skiddle’s Promoter Fund, which will give thousands of promoters an opportunity to access well-needed funding for their events,” adds NTIA CEO Michael Kill. “It’s amazing to see companies like Skiddle investing in the future of the sector, encouraging new ideas and concepts to keep an extremely important industry moving forward even during these uncertain times.”

 


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NTIA launches campaign to save Brixton Academy

The UK’s Night-Time Industries Association (NTIA) has launched a campaign to save O2 Academy Brixton from closure.

The future of the 5,000-cap Academy Music Group (AMG) venue is under threat after police applied to Lambeth Council seeking the revocation of the venue’s licence, having “lost confidence in the premises licence holder” following the events of 15 December 2022, when two people died in a crush at a show by singer/songwriter Asake.

An online petition launched to save the London venue by concert-goer Stuart O’Brien has attracted almost 100,000 signatures, and the NTIA is now urging people to show the importance of the Academy by submitting representations of support to the council by midnight on Monday 15 May.

It has formulated a letter for representation on its system for supporters to sign and submit to the authority.

“Without this venue in London, we would see a huge void in our cultural economy, a considerable gap in touring capability, loss of jobs and one less platform for headline domestic and international artists to perform, losing out to our international counterparts,” reads the letter.

“The potential impact of this closure would have huge ramification within the local economy”

“This venue is a huge talent bed for new artists, and for many performing within this space, it has been a turning point within their career, with many artists today citing this space as one of their pinnacle career moments.

“The potential impact of this closure would have huge ramification within the local economy, recent research has shown that we are already seeing an estimated 1/2 million pounds worth of lost revenue being suffered by local businesses every week since its temporary closure, with some unable to weather the suspension period.”

It continues: “I have not lost sight of the tragic incident that occurred in December , but would respectfully ask you to consider working with AMG and the venue to learn from what has happened and enhance the licence to ensure that this could never happens again.

“At this moment I would urge all involved to step forward and engage in productive and meaningful discussions, with an aim to resolve the current challenges and present a unified position on delivering the safe and effective management of this space in the future.”

 


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Live groups blast government’s energy relief plan

Live music organisations have reacted with disappointment to details of the UK government’s new Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS).

Chancellor Jeremy Hunt unveiled the scaled-back initiative, which will replace the existing Energy Bill Relief Scheme from 1 April and will run for 12 months, earlier this week.

Sky News reports the EBDS will cost taxpayers £12.5 billion less and will reduce rather than cap energy cost. Businesses will only able to benefit from the scheme when bills reach £302 and £107 per MWh for electricity and gas, respectively.

Previously, wholesale prices were fixed for all non-domestic energy customers at £211 per MWh for electricity and £75 per MWh for gas for six months between 1 October and 31 March 2023.

“The government has been clear that such levels of support were time-limited and intended as a bridge to allow businesses to adapt,” says a statement from HM Treasury. “The latest data shows wholesale gas prices have now fallen to levels just before Putin’s invasion of Ukraine and have almost halved since the current scheme was announced.

“The new scheme therefore strikes a balance between supporting businesses over the next 12 months and limiting taxpayer’s exposure to volatile energy markets.”

“The average energy bill for live music venues has gone up by nearly 300% which is leading to permanent venue closures as owners struggle to cover costs”

However, Jon Collins, CEO of trade body LIVE, says the latest measures have increased the level of uncertainty for venue operators.

“The average energy bill for live music venues has gone up by nearly 300% which is leading to permanent venue closures as owners struggle to cover costs,” he says. “This decision further jeopardises these well-loved establishments – restricting access to live music, inhibiting venues’ ability to turn a profit, and damaging town and city centres at a time when we desperately need growth.”

Mark Davyd, CEO of grassroots venues organisation Music Venue Trust, describes the latest measures as “bizarre” and is calling for further clarification from the chancellor.

“The challenges caused by energy bills to grassroots music venues is understood by Jeremy Hunt and the government to be so bad that he has been compelled to write to Ofgem asking that they take action and do something about it,” says Davyd. “That’s good – something does need to be done, because the charges and conditions being forced upon the sector are absurd. The average increase in the sector is 278%. Demands are being made for excessive deposits, suppliers don’t actually want to supply and frankly, there is no market. There is simply an expensive monopoly with extraordinary prices and conditions.

“However, apparently the same evidence that has caused Jeremy Hunt to send the letter to Ofgem laying out these issues was considered insufficient that it would cause him to include Grassroots Music Venues within the specific support he subsequently announced. Venues, alongside the whole of hospitality, have been dumped into a general category of support that is so insufficient that it must inevitably result in permanent closures of venues.

“We are therefore forced to conclude that whilst Jeremy Hunt fully accepts that these energy bills will close music venues, he is not prepared to do anything concrete about it… except send letters”

“We are therefore forced to conclude that whilst Jeremy Hunt fully accepts that these energy bills will close music venues, he is not prepared to do anything concrete about it… except send letters.”

He continues: “The package of supported industries includes libraries and museums, who have neither comparatively high energy bills nor a non-functioning energy market and the basis on which he seems to have made the decisions on what would and would not be included in a package of support from 1 April are, at best, highly unusual.

“Mr Hunt has told Ofgem he would like to see the results of the investigation he has asked for in time for the budget. We would strongly urge them to complete that work with sufficient expediency that the chancellor can revisit the support in that budget and recognise that grassroots music venues should have been included within the exceptional support he has offered to libraries and museums.”

Elsewhere, Night-Time Industries Association chief Michael Kill says the announcement highlights that the government is “out of touch” with businesses.

“The scaling back of the energy relief scheme by government at the end of April will without doubt mean thousands of businesses and jobs will be lost in the coming months,” he adds.

 


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Budget prompts call for UK live music commission

The UK’s Music Venue Trust (MVT) is calling on the government to set up a live music commission after criticising the “missed opportunities” of today’s budget presented by chancellor Jeremy Hunt.

The organisation welcomes Hunt’s announcement, delivered as part of his Autumn Statement, that business rates relief will be extended from 50% to 75% from 1 April 2023 and urges the chancellor and PM to bring forward a full review of the issue for grassroots venues “at the earliest opportunity”.

However there was further frustration for the industry, as pleas to reduce VAT on ticketing were ignored once more.

“A live music commission can provide the government with the tools it needs to be able to recognise the incredible asset the UK has in its grassroots music venues”

“Multiple opportunities to stabilise and grow the live music sector are being consistently missed,” says MVT CEO Mark Davyd. “Our grassroots music venue sector creates 29,000 jobs, delivering over 170,000 performances to more than 20 million people. It is a vital sector with real opportunities to deliver growth, but that is not recognised and acted upon in this Autumn Statement.

“In light of these missed opportunities, Music Venue Trust calls for the government to set up a live music commission. This body can be charged with considering the significant opportunities to stabilise and grow the live music sector, with the aim of informing future government policy so that these opportunities are not consistently missed.

“A live music commission can provide the government with the tools it needs to be able to recognise the incredible asset the UK has in its grassroots music venues and ensure that future policy protects, secures and improves them.”

“Unprecedented operating conditions are pushing our sector to the brink”

Jon Collins, CEO of trade body LIVE, acknowledges the government’s desire to bring stability to the UK economy, but says the budget offers “little help” to secure the future of the UK’s live industry.

“Unprecedented operating conditions are pushing our sector to the brink, as much-loved venues close their doors, tours are cancelled and artists drop out of the industry,” he says.

“The pandemic hangover combined with the increased cost of living has led to 54% of people stating they are less disposed to attending live entertainment, putting incredible pressure on the live music sector. Today, we renew our call for a reintroduction of a lower VAT rate on ticket sales to inject cash into the bottom line of struggling businesses, bring us in line with many other European countries, and secure the future of live music for all.”

“When businesses should be preparing for the busiest period of the year, they are now having to consider their future”

The Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), which has more than 1,400 members, including nightclubs, bars, casinos, festivals, and supply chain businesses ,also criticises the budget for a perceived lack of clarity and suggests the measures outlined do not gone far enough.

“This government is guilty of neglecting thousands of businesses and millions of employees and freelancers across the night time economy, this budget has not gone far enough and still lacks clarity, and will without doubt see a huge swathe of SMEs [small and medium enterprises] and independent businesses disappear in the coming months,” says NTIA chief Michael Kill.

“When businesses should be preparing for the busiest period of the year, they are now having to consider their future, and will remember the fourth failed attempt to deliver a budget to safeguard businesses at the sharpest end of the crisis. There is no consideration for the human impact, this will have a devastating effect on not only business owners, but the individuals and families who have committed their lives and livelihoods to this sector.”

 


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Mini-budget ‘delivers little’ for UK live sector

UK live music trade bodies have expressed disappointment over chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng’s mini-budget.

Measures outlined by Kwarteng in the House of Commons today in a bid to boost growth included a 1p cut to the basic rate of income tax from April 2023, along with the abolition of the 45p tax rate for top earners over £150,000, while a planned rise on corporation tax from 19% to 25% has been scrapped and a 1.25% rise in National Insurance to be reversed.

But LIVE CEO Jon Collins, who wrote an open letter to the chancellor earlier this week calling for a reduction in VAT and business rates, says the announcement does little to help the live sector.

“Today’s announcement delivers little for the UK’s world leading live music industry”

“While we are pleased to see the government taking steps to alleviate the cost-of-living crisis, today’s announcement delivers little for the UK’s world leading live music industry,” he says. “Jobs are already on a knife edge, and we agree with the chancellor that there are too many barriers in sectors like ours where the UK leads the world. Combined with the impact of reduced public spending power and rising costs across the supply chain, businesses that are already struggling to turn a profit will face bankruptcy and closure.

“Only the emergency measures that we have suggested to government will prevent this – injecting cash into the bottom line of struggling businesses through a reduction in VAT on ticket sales, as well as major reform of business rates.”

Association of Independent Festivals (AIF) CEO Paul Reed adds his voice to the chorus of disapproval.

“Today’s announcement from the chancellor means very little for our £1.76bn UK festival industry,” he says. “We’ve faced unprecedented challenges on increased costs, supply chain and low consumer confidence, with audiences facing a social emergency. This shows no sign of relenting as we look to 2023.

“What we need is an urgent reduction of VAT on tickets to 5%, and an assurance that festival businesses will be classed as vulnerable and eligible for support with the energy crisis beyond March 2023.”

Night-Time Industries Association (NTIA) chief Michael Kill also shares his frustration at the mini-budget, which he says has left the night time economy in the cold.

“I would urge the chancellor and government to reconsider these measures, given the limited impacts of the current tax cuts on the immediate crisis for many businesses across the sector”

“We are extremely disappointed with the chancellor’s announcement this morning,” he says. “It will be seen as a missed opportunity to support businesses that have been hardest hit during this crisis, causing considerable anxiety, anger and frustration across the sector as once again they feel that many will have been left out in the cold.”

Earlier this week, the government revealed its Energy Bill Relief Scheme, which will see energy bills for UK businesses cut by around half of their expected level this winter. The news followed the revelation that some UK live music venues are seeing their energy bills increase by an average of 300% –in some cases as much as 740% – adding tens of thousands of pounds to their running costs.

Under the scheme, wholesale prices are expected to be fixed for all non-domestic energy customers at £211 per MWh for electricity and £75 per MWh for gas for six months between 1 October and 31 March 2023. Kwarteng says the subsidising of both domestic and business energy bills will cost £60 billion for the next six months.

But Kill stresses that the intervention is “unlikely to be enough to ensure businesses have the financial headroom to survive the winter”.

“I would urge the chancellor and government to reconsider these measures, given the limited impacts of the current tax cuts on the immediate crisis for many businesses across the sector, the extremely vulnerable position the night time economy and hospitality sectors remain in, and re-evaluate the inclusion of general business rates relief and the reduction of VAT within these measures,” he says.

 


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Energy crisis ‘existential challenge’ for live biz

UK live music trade bodies have warned the sector faces an “existential challenge” from the energy crisis after prime minister Liz Truss announced a temporary price cap for businesses.

The new PM unveiled an estimated £150 billion package today, which will see energy bills capped at £2,500 for households for next two years while the government gets the energy market “back on track”.

An equivalent price cap guarantee will be offered to all businesses, charities and public sector organisations for six months, after which a review will take place. Hospitality and other vulnerable sectors will be guaranteed additional support after the six-month period.

“We welcome the government’s energy announcement today and the measures outlined by the prime minister, but we urgently need more detail on how the government plans to support struggling businesses facing energy costs increasing by as much as 1,700%,” says LIVE CEO Jon Collins. “To support the live music industry, we also call on the government to introduce targeted action by reducing VAT on ticket sales to 5% and reforming business rates.”

“The triple threat of a cost-of-living crisis, the post-pandemic hangover, and skyrocketing energy prices could spell the end of the UK’s live music scene as we know it”

A recent industry survey revealed that music businesses across the country are currently facing enormous energy cost increases, forcing many to consider closing their doors and leading Collins to warn last week that the “triple threat of a cost-of-living crisis, the post-pandemic hangover, and skyrocketing energy prices could spell the end of the UK’s live music scene as we know it”.

“Millions of people have just enjoyed a spectacular summer of live music, but this is now under threat,” he said. “We face cuts to programming, venue closures and an unbearable strain on an already fragile industry. Government must act to protect this world-leading and uniquely British endeavour before it is too late.”

Responding to today’s intervention, Music Venue Trust venue support manager Clara Cullen stresses that a longer-term solution is required.

“The policy announced today only goes some way in alleviating the challenge”

“The financial impact of the energy price rises on the grassroots music venue sector presents an existential challenge,” she says. “For a sector with a total gross turnover of £399 million, the current rise equates to an additional £90m in costs.

“The policy announced today only goes some way in alleviating the challenge, in the very short-term, by creating an energy price cap for businesses that will be in place for an initial six months. The government has committed to reviewing this policy in conjunction with the hospitality sector. Music Venue Trust will contribute to this review to ensure the perspective of grassroots music venues is included in this decision-making process.

“As the policy announced today is only a temporary short-term measure, Music Venue Trust urges the government to take further action to ensure a long-term solution for energy provision for grassroots music venues providing an energy supply which is affordable, reliable and sustainable. We need this action to take place as soon as possible to protect, secure and improve our grassroots music venues.”

“This half measure package is tantamount to support experienced during the pandemic, but lacks considerable detail to alleviate current business concerns”

Michael Kill, CEO of the Night-Time Industries Association, believes the support package falls short of requirements.

“We are extremely disappointed at the announcement by the prime minister today,” he says. “This half measure package is tantamount to support experienced during the pandemic, but lacks considerable detail to alleviate current business concerns.”

“We have no time for drip fed support, or to await the impact assessment of incremental measures, this needs to be a concise and immediately accessible package, which is proportionate and scalable.

“As the first major announcement of the prime minister and chancellor’s tenure, the government has failed businesses today, and with mounting debt across the sector we will see many have no choice but to consider the future, placing thousands of jobs at risk in the coming weeks, without additional support.”

Last month, IQ heard from a number of European arenas who also say that skyrocketing energy costs are emerging as the sector’s biggest challenge since the Covid-19 pandemic. ASM Global’s Marie Lindqvist said the prices for electricity and gas at the company’s venues have quadrupled since the beginning of the year, with the UK being hit the hardest.

 


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UK businesses face closure over energy crisis

Grassroots music venues are among the small and medium-sized businesses in the UK that are facing closure without immediate action to curb rocketing fuel bills.

With businesses excluded from the energy cap, some venues are seeing their energy bills increase by an average of 300% –in some cases as much as 740% – adding tens of thousands of pounds to their running costs.

Based on a survey of its 941 venue members, Music Venue Trust (MVT) revealed that venues face an average 316% rise in fuel bills, taking the average cost to £5,179 per month per venue, up from the current average of £1,245.

One venue has been quoted £42,000 a year for fuel – more than treble its previous bill of £13,200 – with the supplier saying they will only accept full payment in advance.

MVT is now warning that the surge in energy bills means that around 30% of the entire network of venues face the threat of permanent closure.

Around 30% of MVT’s entire network of venues face the threat of permanent closure

Pubs are also seeing energy costs soar by as much as 300%, with brewery bosses telling the BBC that the crisis would cause “real and serious irreversible” damage to the industry without support.

Both the hospitality and entertainment sectors are now urging the government to introduce a cap on the price of energy for businesses. The live music sector is also calling for VAT to be decreased from the current 20% to 12.5% and for business rates relief to be extended.

“Alongside the simply unaffordable increases to costs, the government must urgently address the fact that the market for energy supply has collapsed,” says Music Venue Trust CEO Mark Davyd.

“We have multiple examples where venues do not have any option other than to accept whatever price increases and tariffs are proposed by the sole supplier prepared to offer them power at all. The situation has rapidly deteriorated into a monopoly.”

“The new prime minister must ensure that music businesses are included in the support measures”

UK Music chief executive Jamie Njoku-Goodwin adds: “Spiralling energy costs have created an existential threat for venues and music studios. It’s urgent that government takes action to support businesses with the costs they are facing.

“We all saw just how miserable life was without live music during the pandemic, when venues were closed for months – the high cost of energy bills could now close them forever.

“The new prime minister must ensure that music businesses are included in the support measures that are brought forward to deal with soaring energy costs.

“The government should look at cutting VAT and extending business rate support to help music businesses that are fighting for their survival.”

Last week, IQ heard from a number of European arenas who also say that skyrocketing energy costs are emerging as the sector’s biggest challenge since the Covid-19 pandemic.

ASM Global’s Marie Lindqvist said the prices for electricity and gas at the company’s venues have quadrupled since the beginning of the year, with the UK being hit the hardest. Read the full story here.

 


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Sacha Lord appointed chair of NTIA board

Parklife and The Warehouse Project co-founder Sacha Lord has been appointed chair of the UK’s Night Time Industries Association (NTIA) board of directors.

Lord, who is night time economy advisor for Greater Manchester, has worked with the NTIA and stakeholders across the UK over the last two years.

The trade association has been at the heart of the fight to gain representation and support for businesses throughout the pandemic.

“The Night Time Industries Association is a critical player in the sector, and has been a key voice in representing operators, not just in London but nationally across the UK,” says Lord.

“I am honoured to be joining as chair at this pivotal time in the sector’s recovery. There is still so much work to be done to help operators through these difficult times, and I wholly support the NTIA in their efforts to create better working practices for those in the industry, achieve greater funding for businesses nationwide, and develop vital initiatives to ensure everyone working within, or using the night time economy, gets home safely.”

“We are looking forward to harnessing his passion and drive in establishing a stronger voice for the sector”

NTIA CEO Michael Kill adds: “I have been lucky enough to have worked very closely with Sacha over the last three years, and alongside welcoming him as the chair of the board of directors at the Night Time Industries Association, would like to personally thank him on behalf of the industry for his exceptional work and support during the crisis.

“As a leading figurehead within our industry, we are looking forward to harnessing his passion and drive in establishing a stronger voice for the sector, adding another dimension to the public and political agenda to drive home positive change, and support an extremely ambitious strategy for the sector in the future. The unanimous appointment by the board is testament to the tireless work that he has put into representing this industry.”

 


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