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Gallagher, Rogers, Weller and more for 20th TCT shows

Teenage Cancer Trust has announced four of the acts set to play its annual fundraising concerts at the Royal Albert Hall in London this 23–29 March.

Headlining the 20th edition of the charity shows are electronic duo Groove Armada, Welsh rockers Stereophonics (with special guest Paul Weller), Noel Gallagher’s High-Flying Birds and funk pioneers Nile Rodgers and Chic, on 25, 26, 27 and 29 March, respectively, with more acts still to be announced.

The Who frontman Roger Daltrey CBE, a longtime Teenage Cancer Trust patron, says: “Once again, we’ve got some incredible artists on the bill for 2020, and I can’t thank them enough for giving up their time for Teenage Cancer Trust. Since the first gig back in 2000, audiences have raised millions to fund Teenage Cancer Trust nurses, support teams and special hospital wards that have helped young people cope with some unimaginably hard times. Without Teenage Cancer Trust these specialist services would simply not be there.

“I’ve seen firsthand the difference this support makes to so many young people with cancer over the years, and I’m beyond proud to be a part of the Teenage Cancer Trust team. Everyone who’s helped us achieve this is a hero in my book, and I’d like to thank everyone who has got us this far.

“Teenage Cancer Trust started out 30 years ago to change everything for young people with cancer. And that’s exactly what we’ve done. But we want a world where cancer doesn’t stop young people from living their lives-there’s so much more we need to do.

“This age group deserves these facilities and programmes in our NHS, but without your support for this charity they would not exist. By buying a ticket to these shows you will be helping this great cause do exactly that.”

“We’re incredibly grateful for the amazing support from the artists getting involved in our 2020 gigs”

Before Teenage Cancer Trust (TCT) was established in 1990, there was no specialist cancer care for teenagers and young adults. Those aged 13-24 were being treated on adult wards, or in children’s wards, and this could cause additional stress and trauma, according to TCT. Many felt alone and isolated, as it was likely they’d never meet another person their age with cancer.

Today, around half of all young people with cancer are treated on 28 TCT wards across the UK, by specialist nurses and youth support teams. Almost every young person with cancer can get support from specialist TCT nurses wherever they live.

“The leap forward in care that Teenage Cancer Trust has been able to provide to young people facing cancer over the past 30 years has only been possible thanks to our generous supporters, including our Royal Albert Hall artists and audiences,” explains Kate Collins, CEO of Teenage Cancer Trust. “But much more needs to change, and we can’t wait another 30 years for that to happen.

“That’s we’re incredibly grateful for the amazing support from the artists getting involved in our 2020 gigs. It’s going to be an unforgettable experience and will help us support every young person with cancer who needs us.”

Around 100 young people who’ve been supported by Teenage Cancer Trust will enjoy the ‘ultimate backstage experience’ during the 2020 shows, which includes meet and greets with the acts, as well as the chance to write and perform their own song and appear on stage alongside Daltrey to share their TCT experiences.

Tickets go on sale this Friday (24 January) at 9.30am via Ticketmaster, Gigs and Tours and the Royal Albert Hall website.

 


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IoW Festival announces first artists for 2019 event

The Isle of Wight Festival has announced the first artists playing its 2019 event. Traditionally marking the start of the UK festival season, the Isle of Wight Festival returns for its 51st year from 13 to 16 June in Seaclose Park, Newport.

More than 70,000 people attended the event last year over three days of live music in Newport on the Isle of Wight.

Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds will kick off proceedings on the Friday evening, returning to the festival for the first time since 2012. On the Saturday, George Ezra will make his first major UK festival headline debut and Isle of White Festival veterans Biffy Clyro will take the headline spot on the closing night.

“We are delighted to be headlining the Isle of Wight Festival again. ’Tis a beauty. Hail Satan,” comment the Scottish rockers.

Elsewhere, festivalgoers will see performances by Anne-Marie, Bastille, Courteeners, DMA’s, Miles Kane, Haçienda Classiçal and Freya Ridings. Award-winning DJ and producer Fatboy Slim will make his Isle of Wight debut, playing the main stage for a special guest slot on Saturday night.

“It’s going to be brilliant to return to the beautiful Isle. I’m extremely flattered to have been asked to headline and can’t wait to get up and play”

“It’s going to be brilliant to return to the beautiful Isle and play new songs to an audience that has heard the record. I’m extremely flattered to have been asked to headline and can’t wait to get up and play,” says Ezra, who previously performed at the festival in 2017.

Tickets go on sale for the festival on Friday 25 January at 9am. Presale tickets for Barclaycard users will be available from Wednesday 23 January at 8am. Weekend tickets cost between £145 and £175, with children under 12 entering free. A range of accommodation is available, including luxury tipis with cocktails and hot breakfast, and ethical camping experiences.

Live Nation acquired a majority stake in the festival in March 2017, adding to its portfolio of music festivals around the world.

 


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We are Manchester benefit raises £270,000+

We are Manchester, the September benefit concert staged by Manchester Arena, raised more than £270,000 for the Manchester Memorial Fund, which will go towards the cost of establishing a permanent memorial to the victims of 22 May’s bombing.

The successful 9 September charity event, headlined by Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, marked the re-opening of the 21,000-cap. venue following May’s terror attack, which killed 22 people.

In total, £274,085 has been raised for the charity, with further money to be collected from memorabilia auctions, which are still taking place. The government has also agreed to a one-off grant of £64,834, which represents the value of the VAT on the ticket sales.

“While we will never forget the horrific events of 22 May, we will not let them stop us from bringing live music to our city”

“While we will never forget the horrific events of 22 May, we will not let them stop us from bringing live music to our city,” says the SMG-operated arena’s general manager, James Allen. “[We are Manchester] was a landmark moment in helping the city move forward and I’m now honoured to present money raised by the event to the Manchester Memorial Fund.”

The lord mayor of Manchester, Eddy Newman, adds: “The concert has raised a significant amount of money for the Memorial Fund, and I’d like to thank the generosity of the organisers, the acts and, most of all, the people who attended.

“Manchester is determined to deliver a lasting and appropriate memorial, or memorials, for those who tragically lost their lives in the attack on 22 May. Developing these plans will be a careful process and time will be taken to ensure that families and other affected are consulted and involved as plans emerge.”

 


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“A phenomenal success”: We are Manchester unites a city

Music returned to Manchester Arena for the first time since May on Saturday, as a capacity crowd turned out for We are Manchester, a benefit concert that marked the reopening of the venue and raised funds for a memorial to the victims of 22 May’s bombing.

James Allen, general manager of the 21,000-cap. venue, says the show was a “phenomenal success and this was down to the commitment of everyone involved, from the amazing artists to the dedicated arena teams, production and emergency services.

“However, it was the people who attended on the night representing Manchester who embraced the spirit of the event, and showed the strength that Manchester has – and that the arena is truly a part of the Manchester community.”

As with Eagles of Death Metal’s return to Paris, the concert – organised by the arena’s operator, SMG Europe – opened not with a minute’s silence, but a ‘minute of noise’, conducted by poet Longfella:

Other performances included the Courteeners, Blossoms, Rick Astley, Bugzy Malone, Pixie Lott, comedian Peter Kay and headliner Noel Gallagher, who shed a tear before performing Oasis’s ‘Don’t Look Back in Anger’ – a song which has become symbolic of the city’s resilience, and was performed by Coldplay and Ariana Grande at June’s One Love Manchester concert.

The arena has been closed since 22 May, when a Muslim suicide bomber, Salman Ramadan Abedi, detonated an improvised device outside its foyer after a show by Grande, killing 22.

Security for the reopening was provided by Showsec, with Kay – a former arena steward – wearing a yellow Showsec jacket on stage. The company describes the event as marking both a “new era for the rejuvenated Manchester Arena” and a chance for its stewards to “settle in and feel comfortable working at the venue once again”.

Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, appeared before the show and read out the names of all those who lost their lives in the attack. “Thank you for being who you are,” he told concertgoers. “We are Manchester, a city united. Nothing will ever change us. Nothing will ever divide us.”

“We have had to come back to show defiance, to show we are not scared and we don’t want Manchester to be scared”

Those injured in the attack, along with families who lost loved ones, were among those in attendance at the show.

Charlotte Campbell, whose 15-year-old daughter, Olivia, was killed in the attack, told the Press Association: “It feels surreal at the minute. We have had to come back to show defiance, to show we are not scared and we don’t want Manchester to be scared.

“Music was Olivia’s life. If she had been still here today she would have been walking through those doors with us, showing her defiance, that they may have got her but she’s not beaten. She’s here with us. It’s a massive mix of emotions, there will be tears, there will be laughter, but the main thing is we are here. We have proved no one is going to beat us.”

 


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Manchester Arena to reopen on 9 September

Manchester Arena will reopen on Saturday 9 September with a benefit show, We are Manchester, to honour victims of the bombing on 22 May.

All proceeds from the show – headlined by Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds (pictured) and also featuring performances from Courteeners, Blossoms, Rick Astley and poet Tony Walsh, all of whom are from Greater Manchester – will go to a charitable trust, overseen by Manchester’s lord mayor, currently Eddy Newman, to fund a permanent memorial to the attack.

The 21,000-capacity arena has been closed since May, when a Muslim suicide bomber, Salman Ramadan Abedi, detonated an improvised device outside its foyer after a show by Ariana Grande, killing 22.

Security under review after Manchester Arena bomb

A benefit concert featuring Grande, One Love Manchester, was organised by Live Nation, Festival Republic and SJM Concerts in June.

“May’s events will never be forgotten, but they will not stop us – or Mancunian music fans – from coming together to enjoy live music,” comments James Allen, the arena’s general manager. “Manchester Arena has celebrated over 20 years hosting some of the greatest musical talent of all time, and the significant economic and cultural impact that this has on the city means that this legacy must continue.

“We welcome the reopening of the arena, a major venue which attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors, as a powerful symbol of this defiant and resilient spirit”

“Public safety is always our priority and we are doing all we can to keep people safe at our venue. Doors will open at 5pm and we are asking all customers to arrive at the Arena in plenty of time and and to keep personal items to an absolute minimum.”

Tickets, priced at £25 and £30 (plus booking fee), are on sale at 9am tomorrow (17 August) via Eventim and Ticketmaster.

Councillor Sue Murphy, deputy leader of Manchester City Council, says: “Those who perpetrate terrorist attacks want to divide us and stifle our freedoms. No one will ever forget the terrible events of 22 May but Manchester has reacted with love, solidarity and a determination to continue doing the things which make this such a vibrant city.

“We welcome the reopening of the arena, a major venue which attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors, as a powerful symbol of this defiant and resilient spirit. It is entirely fitting that the reopening event should be a memorial fundraiser. Plans for the form and location of any permanent commemorations will be determined in liaison with the families of victims and others affected by the attack.”

 


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