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The New Bosses 2022: Resi Scheuermann, Konzertbüro Schoneberg

The 15th edition of IQ Magazine’s New Bosses was published in IQ 114 this month, revealing 20 of the most promising 30-and-unders in the international live music business.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2022’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous New Bosess 2022 interview with Maciej Korczak, co-founder at Follow The Step in Poland. The series continues with Resi Scheuermann, promoter and organiser at Konzertbüro Schoneberg in Germany.

Born and raised in the countryside near Würzburg in Bavaria, Scheuermann spent her youth either in dance studios and concert halls/clubs, or reading everywhere possible. After school, she spent one year in Australia and New Zealand, working as an au pair, learning English and travelling.

Back in Germany, she moved to Berlin and studied literature and cultural studies with a focus on cultural management and marketing and – more importantly – got to know the Berlin nightlife of live music.

After graduating she undertook some internships and helped electronic music collective O Mato to organise a festival in the Brazilian Amazon, as well as some parties in Berlin. She then landed a marketing and communications job at Konzertbüro Schoneberg but quickly moved back to her strengths of booking and organising concerts, thus kickstarting her promoter career.

Today, she leads Konzertbüro Schoneberg’s Berlin office where she promotes her own growing roster, booking tours for Germany and organising most of Konzertbüro Schoneberg’s shows at all capacities in Berlin.

Scheuermann is also a co-founder of the feminist association fæmm, which aims to bring more female power and support to the male-dominated music business.

 


Did you deliberately go to Australia to improve your English, knowing that you wanted to work in the music business, or was that just a happy coincidence?
Mainly I went to Australia to experience new adventures (and improve my English). In Australia, I was surrounded by so many musicians and singer-songwriters, as the country has such a big and great (street) music culture. This experience had a big influence on me: it made me listen to new kinds of music and I got interested in new genres. But to be honest, I didn’t know yet that I would be part of the music scene in my future, but this trip definitely shaped the idea.

Fæmm sounds like a fantastic initiative. Can you tell us more about it?
In the beginning of 2020, four inspiring women and I, all of us working in the German music business, founded the queer-feministic initiative fæmm. We strive to give FLINTA (female, lesbian, intersex, trans, and agender) persons who work behind, on, and in front of the stage a platform to be seen and heard. We want to create a network for FLINTA persons in the cis-male-dominated music scene. That’s why we offer networking events in cities and during festivals (Reeperbahn Festival in Hamburg and c/o Pop in Cologne).

We also have different social media formats such as interviews, we curate playlists, have (party) cooperations, podcasts, and panels (e.g. I spoke at Reeperbahn Festival 2021 at ARTE stage on the panel Sex, Drugs and Rock ’n’ Roll). We have our own radio show fæmm.fm, a newsletter with FLINTA event tips for Berlin, and an electronic music channel on Soundcloud called “anders.” where FLINTA sets are promoted. We want to create awareness, solidarity, and equity in the music business and help other FLINTAs to get connected.

“I can only be a good promoter if I am 150% into the music and into the artists who I work with”

Can you give us an idea of what acts you already have on your roster and how you have helped develop their careers in Germany?
I only have acts in my roster that I personally really love. I can only be a good promoter if I am 150% into the music and into the artists who I work with. My roster shows my love for different genres: I have some lovely acoustic artists (Ocie Elliott and Penny & Sparrow) as well as some very cool (female-fronted) indie rock/pop/synth acts like Mattiel, and and Jasmyn.

To develop these artists in Germany, I use my growing and very diverse network. As I belong to the “younger” generation, I try to work with them as well as with very experienced colleagues. I also push my artists beyond the mainstream media and try to work with independent (social) media and partners to reach a high range and variety of audience.

What has been your biggest career highlight to date?
The biggest highlight was when I became a promoter as I [originally] started with marketing at Konzertbüro Schoneberg. Next to my job, I also do some freelance work in my “leisure time” and this year I had the honour of booking the RAW+ Festival in Berlin with my friend and fæmm colleague Marie. We managed to book a very cool and diverse 90% FLINTA line-up, which made us very proud and happy. I also worked for The Rolling Stones show in Berlin as a backstage manager.

As a new boss, what one thing would you change to make the live entertainment industry a better place?
We need equality in all aspects, not only in gender. The entertainment industry is still led by white cis men, but we need to include humans in all positions – not only as interns – with different/all gender, origin, religions, believes and looks, to make the industry equal and safe for everyone.

“We all need to make proactive efforts in our thinking and work to change the gender imbalance”

If you could offer the 18-year-old Resi one piece of advice, what would it be?
You can work in the music business. When I was a teenage girl and went to concerts, I didn’t really know what efforts and work lie behind the shows. I could only see a stage with an artist who I loved to see. I didn’t know how the industry works and that I could be part of it – it seemed like a completely different planet. I could never imagine the variety of jobs behind the stage. That has to change – we need to tell the youth what they can become besides the classic dream jobs like teacher, doctor, or firefighter.

Gender imbalance (mostly at festivals) has been an issue again this year. Are there any proactive efforts that promoters can make to help address these problems?
Yes, it is a question of will, money, and attitude. Give them chances, stages, and believe in them. But not only promoters need to change their attitudes, even the media like [radio stations] and artists themselves do. (FLINTA) artists need to build up their core teams [to be] more diverse. Media needs to give FLINTA and other marginalised groups the opportunity to get heard and seen. We all need to make proactive efforts in our thinking and work to change the gender imbalance.

As a young promoter, are there any particular events or forums that you visit to try to discover the next big act, or where you can grow your network of business contacts?
Yes, I am travelling to several festivals with work and/or [voluntarily] to participate actively in networking events, workshops and to visit lots of concerts. I am also in touch with several other initiatives, associations, and agencies, trying to visit their networking events, showcases, and concerts. I read lots of music blogs and magazines and listen to podcasts, playlists and lots of music on several platforms. And, of course, I use social media.

Berlin has some unique venues. Which one is your favourite and why?
That’s difficult. I think my favourites are Lido, Privatclub, silent green and Tempodrom. They are all very different and very unique and that is exactly the taste of Berlin – you never love one thing – you love the whole package.

 


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The New Bosses 2022: Lewis Wilde, DICE

The 15th edition of IQ Magazine’s New Bosses was published in IQ 114 this month, revealing 20 of the most promising 30-and-unders in the international live music business.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2022’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous New Bosess 2022 interview with Kathryn Dryburgh, agent’s assistant at ATC Live in the UK. The series continues with Lewis Wilde, head of music partnerships at DICE (UK).

Born and raised in Bradford, Wilde and a friend started an online music blog in 2011. In 2013, whilst working in Brighton as a support worker and bar-backing (having dropped out of university in London after six months), the music blog caught the attention of Phil Hutcheon, the founder and CEO of DICE.

Hutcheon had been running the music management company Deadly, and was just launching DICE, where Wilde landed an internship in 2014. Starting out as an assistant (to pretty much everything) in the early days, Wilde ended up working toward the position of venue and promoter partnerships, which he took on in 2016. In 2021, he was promoted to head of music partnerships.

 


Having dropped out of uni, how have you still ended up in your dream job, and can you talk a little about the passion for music that prompted you to take the risk of dropping out to do something you love?
It was shocking. Advertising and marketing at London Met. I took a year out after sixth form and just panicked and thought “I need to go to uni now because all my mates have gone,” so I picked any course, pretty much. I thought by being in London I could worm my way into a ‘music’ job. You’re a lot less risk-averse when you’re younger, so at the time it didn’t feel like a big decision. Mum hit the roof though.

It sounds like the start of your career was quite tough – having to work bar jobs to fund your blog exploits. What advice would you give to anyone trying to break into the music industry?
I loved all those jobs, to be fair. I think everyone needs to do a stint in hospitality and deal with the public at some point in their life. Character building. And working as a support worker helps shape your perspective massively. My advice would be to get in early – take in as much experience as you can and put yourself about. Everything else will come from that.

What was your music blog about, and what made it different from others to the extent that you caught the attention of your future boss?
It was just anything me and Leo – who I ran it with – loved. We’d support local parties in the north; push new music, anything from UK rap to techno; interview artists we liked; then DJ off the back of it and ended up throwing a few parties around Europe. It was class looking back. Our main thing was to keep the quality high so people will come back to it. Maybe the curation element got Phil’s attention. I’ll ask him.

“Relationships are the key. Focus on building those where you’re most passionate – the rest will fall into place”

We’ve all just been through an unprecedented couple of years, but you managed to get promoted. Tell us a bit about your pandemic experience – what you were up to, and how the promotion came about?
It was obviously pretty rough at the time. Everyone just mucked in to get through, you’d be working on everything; artist streams, fan support, helping venues with funding, and just checking in to see how people were coping. It’s amazing to be on the other side of it. Thankfully we’re back hiring again. Then, personally, I drank loads and Strava’d everything I did, like everyone else.

What has been your biggest career highlight to date?
Seeing DICE go from a 15 to 400 person company over eight years has been pretty mad. Also, it might be stuck in my head because I saw it in full flow last week – but New Century partnering with DICE is really up there for me. It’s an amazing 1,000-cap venue in Manchester with an unreal team behind it – it’s my new favourite venue in the UK. Watching it come to life last week for the launch was pretty special. Everyone needs to go.

How would you encourage the next generation to choose the live music sector for their chosen career path?
Relationships are the key. Focus on building those where you’re most passionate – the rest will fall into place.

IQ 114 is available now. To subscribe, and get access to our latest issue and all of our content, click here.

 


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The New Bosses 2022: Grant Hall, ASM Global

The 15th edition of IQ Magazine’s New Bosses was published in IQ 114 this month, revealing 20 of the most promising 30-and-unders in the international live music business.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2022’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous New Bosess 2022 interview with Daytona Häusermann, agent at Gadget ABC. The series continues with Grant Hall, director of business services and strategy at ASM Global in North America.

Hall is currently the director of business services and strategy at ASM Global, where he is involved in corporate strategy and overseeing multiple initiatives that support ASM-managed arenas, stadiums, and theatres across North America. Some of the recent projects he’s been involved with are: the roll-out of a KPI reporting system, the reopening of venues post-pandemic, and helping to stand up a new Live Entertainment Division within ASM Global. Before entering this role, Hall served as the business operations manager for ASM Global and New Orleans properties, including the Caesars Superdome and Smoothie King Center.

Hall’s experience outside of ASM Global centres around his time at Ohio University, where he graduated with a bachelor’s in sport management, an MBA, and a Masters in sports administration. While in school, he interned for Spectra’s (now OVG) corporate office and did several projects for notable sports and entertainment organisations.

 


You studied sport management and administration at university. Do you see any obvious areas where other forms of live events can learn from the sports sector? Or vice versa?
Absolutely. Both sports and live events have many similarities in how they operate and how they generate revenues. However, where I believe they become distinct from a typical social event is that fans often affiliate themselves with their favourite sport team or artist. This creates a much deeper connection for these fans and ultimately leads to higher expectations that these industries are expected to achieve.

Speaking from my experience at ASM Global and the events that we manage in conjunction with our event partners, I believe both sports and live events can learn from each other by thinking through the full journey of their customers at an event and doing everything they can to make each touchpoint a memorable and seamless experience. From purchasing a ticket, to trying to beat traffic on the way home – how can we in the industry make the guest experience the best it can be? This is something that I think should be on everyone’s mind.

You have rapidly risen through the ranks at ASM Global. What advice would you give to anyone trying to climb the ladder in such a competitive business?
It is important to understand the big picture and always look into the future for the opportunities and headwinds that may be coming. Although it is vital to complete the tasks that are right in front of you, it is also extremely important to always keep an eye forward and understand how the task impacts each stakeholder connected to the project. This has helped me keep a progressive view when looking at various projects and troubleshoot potential pitfalls I may not have thought about beforehand.

“I believe our industry should focus on creating more opportunities for younger generations to get experience”

The reopening of venues post-pandemic has been a monumental task. What are the biggest lessons you have learned through that process that will benefit you in the years to come?
It was a large but very fulfilling task, as I saw many venues reopen for events and the excitement that came with it. During the reopening process, I learned not to hesitate to raise my hand and help with projects I might not be entirely comfortable with previously. For me, this was stepping into the role of becoming ASM Global’s in-house expert on government stimulus opportunities that were offered in the United States during the pandemic. The initiative I took with this aided and assisted each of our venues, as well as supported our clients who were negatively impacted financially due to Covid-19. With this we secured a combined total of over $100m in stimulus funds.

Are there any particular events or forums you rely on to help you connect and network with peers and potential business partners?
I am looking forward to getting more involved in this since a large portion of these events were halted during the pandemic. I do follow many entertainment publications including Pollstar, VenuesNow, Sports Business Journal, Front Office Sports, SportBusiness, and of course, IQ Magazine.

As a new boss, what one thing would you change to make the live entertainment industry a better place?
I believe our industry should focus on creating more opportunities for younger generations to get experience and explore different career paths in the live entertainment industry. As a university student, you may not have a connection within the industry or a good understanding of all the roles and companies that it takes to put on an event. Opportunities like internships, one-off event jobs, job shadowing, and entertainment-based school projects are all things that I think can be beneficial to students while also providing value to our live entertainment organisations. Together, I believe expanding these opportunities will increase the number of talented individuals entering our industry and help continue to improve the event experience.

“I acted as the ASM in-house government stimulus expert during the initial timeframe of Covid-19”

What has been the highlight of your career, so far?
I have a few highlights that I would like to share during my time with ASM Global. I acted as the ASM in-house government stimulus expert during the initial timeframe of Covid-19, leading to over $100m in funds for ASM clients to be used to offset Covid impacts.

I have been involved in the strategy and execution in almost all company-wide initiatives since April of 2020. This has included the successful creation and launch of the VenueShield Program – Project Renaissance – an effort to reopen 200+ venues after Covid-19, the roll-out of our KPI reporting system, and helping to stand up a new Live Entertainment Division within ASM Global.

On behalf of the Louisiana Stadium & Exposition District, I successfully oversaw a three-year transition period of a 10,000-seat baseball stadium to a multipurpose stadium. During this time period, I negotiated the early termination of a MiLB Triple-A baseball team, negotiated a new lease with a professional MLR tenant, booked multiple other revenue generating events and community events at the stadium, all while navigating through Covid-19 impact on the industry.

One accomplishment that I am particularly fond of is receiving an MBA and Masters in Sports Administration from an Ohio University graduate programme that is continuously the top-ranked sports management graduate programme in the world. While at Ohio University, I was also a member of the team that won the National Sports Forum Case Cup in 2019, a competition between the top sports management graduate programmes.

In addition, as part of being in such a compelling industry, I have been on the sidelines of the CFP National Champions, on the floor of the NCAA Final Four Tournament, and have been up close for many top concerts including AC/DC and the Rolling Stones.

“The best way to identify what you like to do and don’t like to do is to get hands-on experience wherever possible”

If you could offer the 18-year-old Grant one piece of advice, what would it be?
The best way to identify what you like to do and don’t like to do is to jump right in and get hands-on experience wherever possible. So, if a volunteer, internship, or short-term job opportunity presents itself, don’t be afraid to say yes even if it isn’t what you had in mind. These experiences can create a snowball effect; before you know it, you will be in a position you never even knew existed.

What is your favourite venue and why?
The Caesars Superdome in New Orleans, LA. Not only is it an iconic venue that has been around for 45+ years hosting major touring acts, sporting events, and playing a pivotal role in acting as a shelter during Hurricane Katrina, but the Caesars Superdome was where I was lucky enough to get my first job here following post-graduate school.

 


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New Bosses name one thing industry must change

Alumni from IQ Magazine‘s most recent class of New Bosses have identified areas of improvement for the international live music business.

A handful of the next-gen leaders shared their thoughts during Meet the New Bosses: The Class of 2021, at last month’s International Live Music Conference (ILMC).

Theo Quiblier, head of concerts at Two Gentlemen in Switzerland, believes the one thing the industry needs to get better at is normalising failure.

“We are in a fantastic industry where everyone is signing the new top artist or selling out venues or sealing huge deals with festivals but that’s just the tip of the iceberg,” he says. “I feel that we’re all a bit afraid of saying, ‘I went on sale with my favourite band and it didn’t go well’ – as simple as that.

“I feel that we’re all a bit afraid of saying, ‘I went on sale with my favourite band and it didn’t go well'”

“As a promoter, I could say, ‘Oh, I work with this top band,’ and people think, ‘That’s amazing, he must be rich,’ and, in reality, it’s your biggest loss of the year. We need little reality checks, and to say ‘I’m doing my best but I’m not the best’. Sharing insecurities is great because failure happens to everybody.”

Flo Noseda-Littler, agency assistant at Wasserman Music (formerly Paradigm UK), called for better pay for junior staff so more people can viably start their careers in the industry.

“Fair salaries for junior staff and internships so that it enables people in those positions to live in the cities in which they work,” comments Noseda-Littler. “By providing a free internship or a low paid job, you’re cutting off so many people who don’t have the ability to still live with their parents or be subsidised by their parents. And then you’re just reducing the number of people you can recruit and missing out on potentially really ambitious and amazing people.”

Anna Parry, partnerships manager at the O2 in London, echoed Noseda-Littler’s thoughts, adding that companies also need to improve their recruitment strategies in order to reach a more diverse pool of talent.

“This is a job that costs you a lot of time at your desk and a lot of time in your head”

“Companies really need to put more effort into understanding why people aren’t applying for these jobs, and then they need to create a lower barrier of entry for those types of people,” says Parry. “It’s not just saying, ‘Oh okay, well we posted the job on a different forum than we usually would’. It’s going to take a lot more of that to actually make a difference. We need to focus on that because it’s important our industry is representative of the artists we represent.”

Age Versluis (promoter at Friendly Fire in the Netherlands) on the other hand, is petitioning for a four-day workweek: “This is a job that costs you a lot of time at your desk and a lot of time in your head. Since Covid, we’re seeing a lot of people burning out and having trouble getting to that fourth or fifth gear.

“We forget that moving shows for two years to the same months is quite stressful. I think we could use some extra ‘me’ time.”

Tessie Lammle, agent at UTA in the US, echoed her peers’ points, adding: “I was going to say diversity or work-life balance but Theo’s point is huge. I think the younger generation is getting much better at [sharing insecurities].”

Each of the panellists appeared as part of IQ Magazine‘s New Bosses 2021, an annual list celebrating the brightest talent aged 30 and under in the international live music business. See the full list of the distinguished dozen here.

 


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The New Bosses: Remembering the class of 2021

The 14th edition of IQ Magazine‘s New Bosses celebrated the brightest talent aged 30 and under in the international live music business.

The New Bosses 2021 honoured no fewer than a dozen young executives, as voted by their colleagues around the world.

The 14th edition of the annual list inspired the most engaged voting process to date, with hundreds of people taking the time to submit nominations.

The year’s distinguished dozen comprises promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs and more, all involved in the international business and each of whom is making a real difference in their respective sector.

In alphabetical order, the New Bosses 2021 are:

Subscribers can read full interviews with each of the 2021 New Bosses in issue 103 of IQ Magazine.

Click here to subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month – or check out what you’re missing out on with the limited preview below:

 

 


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The New Bosses 2021: Theo Quiblier, Two Gentlemen

The New Bosses 2021 – the latest edition of IQ’s annual celebration of the brightest young talent in the live business today, as voted for by their peers – was published in IQ 103 this month, revealing the 12 promising promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs that make up this year’s list.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2021’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous 2021 New Bosses interview with Tessie Lammle, booking agent at UTA in the US here.

Theo Quiblier started like a lot of people in the industry – in a band with classmates – but quickly realised he was better at finding shows than playing them. He began promoting shows at La Parenthèse in his hometown of Nyon, Switzerland, aged just 16, while also working for festivals such as Montreux Jazz and Antigel.

Spending more time booking shows than studying at university in Geneva, Quiblier was approached by Two Gentlemen’s Patrick David, who offered him a job as a junior booker.

Fast-forward a few years and he is the company’s head of concerts and touring and works with a roster that includes The National, Angel Olsen, The War on Drugs, Sharon Van Etten, Squid, Fontaines D.C., Father John Misty, Viagra Boys, as well as powerhouse Swiss supergroup Brandão Faber Hunger. Quiblier also manages Dino Brandão.

 


You’re a promoter, an agent, and an artist manager – which role is your favourite?
It’s the diversity of roles. Being able to work every day with everyone in the team on so many different topics is thrilling. The more you understand each aspect of the industry, the better you can service your clients and partners.

As you began working in the business as a teenager, do you have a mentor or anyone you turn to for advice?
Patrick David. His experience and knowledge are an inexhaustible source of inspiration to me. If we don’t spend at least one hour on the phone a day debating, it’s probably because one of us is sick. Also, Sébastien Vuignier who has always given me his time. A true legend!

What has been the highlight of your career, so far?
The National at Samsung Hall in Zürich in 2019. When you do this job you secretly dream of promoting your absolute favourite band.

“You learn so much from one single mistake simply because you will not forget it”

What are you most looking forward to as the pandemic restrictions are lifted?
Sweaty gigs in small rooms with people flying all over the place! The band comes on stage and the show hasn’t even started yet you already know the night’s going to be electric. I miss that so badly…

Also finally being able to see live some artists we’ve been working with for more than three years and who still have not been able to come over and perform for the reasons we all know.

What advice would you give to anyone trying to find a job in live music?
Never be afraid to make mistakes. You learn so much from one single mistake simply because you will not forget it. That’s so valuable and entirely part of the process.

The pandemic has been hard on us all – are there any positive aspects that you and Two Gentlemen are taking out of it?
Being able to press pause, sit down together as a company and ask “How are we feeling? How are we doing? How can we improve?”, has been a gift. Also, cooperation with others has never been so good. I can definitely feel a real sense of togetherness.

 


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The New Bosses 2021: Tessie Lammle, UTA

The New Bosses 2021 – the latest edition of IQ’s annual celebration of the brightest young talent in the live business today, as voted for by their peers – was published in IQ 103 this month, revealing the 12 promising promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs that make up this year’s list.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2021’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous 2021 New Bosses interview with Dan Roberts, promoter at Live Nation in the UK here.

After graduating from Bentley University, Tessie Lammle began her career in the mailroom at UTA, rising through the ranks to become an agent who represents artists including The Aces, Tierra Whack, TLC, Pussycat Dolls, Lil Wayne, SAINt JHN and many more.

When traditional touring paused due to Covid-19, Lammle re-thought how artists could reach their fans and collaborated with UTA’s Music Innovation division to book various virtual performances and showcases.

A passionate advocate for other women in the music industry, Lammle is a founding member of UTA’s La Femme Majeure event series and is on the leadership board of the company’s Justice Now task force. Outside of UTA, she is a member of the MusiCares Next Generation Board, and she volunteers with Habitat for Humanity.


Can you tell us how you got involved with La Femme Majeure (LFM) and what its goals are?
A group of colleagues and I founded LFM in 2018. We wanted to create a space for young women in the industry where we could be ourselves and network comfortably. Our main goal is to focus on music’s next era of women leaders.

You interned at Universal Music and ICM – what advice would you give to others when it comes to landing meaningful internships?
There’s a common misconception that you must know someone to break into the industry. The best thing I did to get my foot in the door was to network. It also helps to remember that everyone was in the same situation in the beginning, so you might as well say hello, send an email, and reach out to your potential mentors on LinkedIn. Always lead with kindness.

The pandemic ‘pause’ narrowed the avenues for artists to connect with fans. Can you explain what you did to maximize opportunities for some of your acts?
Throughout the pandemic, UTA has driven success for our clients with our collaborative, 360-degree approach. As a full-service agency, our divisions are constantly communicating with each other.

“I thought that I had to see a live show to truly understand an artist and their potential, but this year has forced me to adapt”

When traditional touring was paused, we worked across all our departments and with new buyers to offer innovative opportunities to our artists. As a result, the agency was able to secure brand partnerships, drive-through concerts, livestreamed performances, publishing deals, film and TV roles, gaming collaborations, podcast hosting gigs, and more for our clients.

If you had a magic wand, what one thing would you change or introduce to improve the live music industry?
More diversity, equity, and inclusion across the board. There has been some great forward momentum and that’s what makes our industry exciting and forever evolving.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
I’m not sure where I’ll be living in five years, or which new artists I’ll be representing, but I do hope to be working with an even bigger roster at UTA. I know I’ll still have a hunger to be constantly finding out-of-the-box opportunities for my clients that leverage all the company’s resources. I also hope in five years I will be able to keep a plant alive for more than three days and will be working my way towards having a family!

You signed a number of artists during lockdown. Were those difficult pitches, and can you say anything about how you tailor your career plan strategies depending on the artist and genre?
I always thought that I had to see a live show to truly understand an artist and their potential, but this past year has forced me to adapt. No two artists ever have the same goals, even within the same genre. I am a firm believer that you must cater to the artist first and hear their visions before you set a strategy.

 


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The New Bosses 2021: Dan Roberts, Live Nation

The New Bosses 2021 – the latest edition of IQ’s annual celebration of the brightest young talent in the live business today, as voted for by their peers – was published in IQ 103 this month, revealing the 12 promising promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs that make up this year’s list.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2021’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous 2021 New Bosses interview with Flo Noseda-Littler, agency assistant at Paradigm in the UK here.

Dan Roberts was born in Boston, Massachusetts, but brought up in Nottinghamshire in the UK. His introduction to live music began, aged 16, when Liars Club [in Manchester] owner Ricky Haley paid him to put up posters. From there Roberts moved to Leeds to study biology, while local entrepreneur Ash Kollakowski taught him how to rep shows and book local supports.

When he completed his studies, he found a job at DHP, where he learned to be a national promoter, and five years later he moved to Metropolis Music and the Live Nation family.


You studied biology – are there any parallels at all with your work, or did any of the disciplines learned at university help you?
Communicating concisely in writing and applying a functional, transactional mindset to the processes that go into building a show. You can’t teach taste though.

Having a US passport can be very useful in this business – have you been able to take advantage of that for your work, as yet?
I once went to the Hamptons with Matt Bates, which was very nice. Aside from that and a trip to NYC to see Partisan Records and Cigarettes After Sex team, I look forward to building my US network further as we return to full business.

You started working on shows while you were a student: do you have a mentor or anyone you turn to for advice?
Ricky Haley, Dan McEvoy, Ash Kollakowski, Dan Ealam, George Akins, Anton Lockwood, Raye Cosbert, Will Marshall, Bob Angus, Denis Desmond, Melvin Benn… What Denis, Raye and Bob can communicate with ten words would take most people a hundred.

Learning how to rep shows and book local support acts in Nottingham has obviously served you well. Does that experience help when it comes to choosing who to work with in cities around the UK?
A good network of reps is useful. As an industry, we’ve lost a lot of freelancers on the production side over this period which is a travesty.

“Taking acts from 200-cap rooms to Brixton Academy is incredibly rewarding”

What has been the highlight of your career, so far?
Taking acts from 200-cap rooms to Brixton Academy is incredibly rewarding. Show-wise it would have to be The Strokes at the Roundhouse in February 2020, which I worked on with Bob. Implementing 100% digital ticketing with Ticketmaster was an operational win.

The pandemic has been hard on us all – are there any positive aspects that you are taking out of it?
This time has given me a chance to get closer to the teams at Metropolis, Live Nation, Festival Republic and Ticketmaster.

What are you most looking forward to as restrictions lift?
Fontaines D.C. playing A Lucid Dream to 10,250 people at Ally Pally. More specifically, the bit at the start where Grian goes “shew”. That on a big L-Acoustics or d&b rig at about 103db, with their wonderful team around me at FOH, that would be nice.

What’s the biggest challenge for you and your colleagues now that the business is emerging from lockdown restrictions?
Everyone is coming back to shows from different places and from different experiences during lockdown, so empathy is a must. Our communal mental health is very important as we return.

 


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The New Bosses 2021: Flo Noseda-Littler, Paradigm

The New Bosses 2021 – the latest edition of IQ’s annual celebration of the brightest young talent in the live business today, as voted for by their peers – was published in IQ 103 this month, revealing the 12 promising promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs that make up this year’s list.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2021’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous 2021 New Bosses interview Age Versluis, promoter at Friendly Fire in the Netherlands here.

Born in London’s Waterloo area, Noseda-Littler was brought up around jazz and soul music by a family of entertainers – her mum is a singer, granddad a pianist, and grandmother a dancer.

At university, where she studied civil engineering, Noseda-Littler started booking musician friends into venues and festivals around the UK, and after graduating she started working under the wing of her cousin at Academy Music Group (AMG), which also provided her with a chance to work at Wireless Festival.

An internship at Brixton Academy followed, before, in 2015, she found herself a job as general agency assistant at Paradigm, where for the last three years she has been on several committees and task forces to bridge the gap between support staff and agency management.


You come from a musical family. What’s the first gig you can remember going to – and when did you decide you should pursue a career in the business?
My first memory was at 8 when we went to Party in the Park, Hyde Park. It was a magical experience seeing live music, and going to a festival for the first time with thousands of people.

What set you on your path in the industry?
At university, I fell into booking my boyfriend’s band. I started a database of contacts and soon managed to get gigs at cool UK venues and festivals. Something ignited in me and I knew I had to do this full-time!

Do you think working on the venues side of the business has helped you in your career on the agency side?
Working at Brixton and AMG gave me the building blocks to understand live shows, from promotion and ticketing to backstage issues and settlements. I got to shadow lots of different staff, which showed me the practicalities of how much it takes to execute a show onsite. It was so useful to draw on those experiences when learning the agency world and routing shows together.

“It’s been vital for both agent and promoter to be transparent and flexible in order to protect the longevity of the industry”

We’ve heard a lot about the closer collaboration between agents and promoters during the past year. What’s your experience of that been, and how do you see it benefitting Paradigm’s clients as the business reopens?
Promoters are usually the first to take big financial risks on a tour, which has never been more to their detriment than in the past 17 months. During these ever-changing times, it’s been vital for both agent and promoter to be transparent and flexible in order to protect the longevity of the live industry. In demanding less from our promoters in the short term, it supports the recovery and prospects of our clients’ live careers. We are all in this together and just want to see the business thriving again!

You’ve become one of the go-to people for younger staff at Paradigm. What advice would you give to other young people who are trying to break into the live music business?
Festivals offer a range of volunteering roles so it’s worth checking them out to gain experience and meet people if there’s nothing music related on your CV. Internships often involve being thrown into the deep end, but you shouldn’t be afraid to ask questions. What really gets noticed is an eagerness to learn and integrity of work.

“A bigger effort is needed across the industry to reduce waste, lower emissions, and protect the future of our planet”

Where would you like to see yourself in five years’ time?
Booking tours in an industry that has fully recovered and is booming once more!

The pandemic has been hard on us all – are there any positive aspects that you can take out of the last 17 months?
During furlough, I discovered a love of running and went on to complete my first half marathon. This new hobby has been a freeing and stress-busting tool for me, that I hadn’t been able to try in my old routine.

Mental health has been a hot topic during the pandemic worldwide which has filtered across the workplace. These unprecedented times have allowed us to make our well-being a higher priority and feel more comfortable in vocalising how we feel. I’m hopeful mental health will remain high on the agenda when touring returns to a normal pace. It’ll result in a healthier and happier industry!

As a new boss, what one thing would you change to make the live music industry a better place?
One of the most urgent issues is energy consumption. There are some great initiatives, like The Green Rider, but a bigger effort is needed across the industry to reduce waste, lower emissions, and protect the future of our planet.


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The New Bosses 2021: Age Versluis, Friendly Fire

The New Bosses 2021 – the latest edition of IQ’s annual celebration of the brightest young talent in the live business today, as voted for by their peers – was published in IQ 103 this month, revealing the 12 promising promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs that make up this year’s list.

To get to know this year’s cohort a little better, IQ conducted interviews with each one of 2021’s New Bosses, discovering their greatest inspirations and pinpointing the reasons for their success.

Catch up on the previous 2021 New Bosses interview with Jenna Dooling, agent at WME in the UK here.

As one of the worst drummers in his hometown, Utrecht, Age Versluis realised that organising shows was a better option. During his music management studies, he interned for a festival, a venue, a record label and a promoter to help him decide what his next step would be.

Having interned at the first edition of Best Kept Secret festival in 2013, Versluis remained at Friendly Fire, where he became a promoter five years ago. He has since developed a roster that includes Khruangbin, Fontaines D.C., Black Pumas, Cigarettes After Sex, Phoebe Bridgers and many others.

Friendly Fire also runs an open-air venue in Amsterdam throughout the summer, which Versluis operates.


Do you have a mentor or anyone you turn to for advice?
Roel Coppen [agent, promoter, co-owner, Friendly Fire] has taught me everything about spotting talent and working out a long-term approach for an artist. For the last couple of years, I have been learning more about bigger shows and collaborations from Rense van Kessel and Lauri van Ommen in our office.

What has been the highlight of your career, so far?
The biggest highlight is convincing an artist to trust and play multiple shows in the Netherlands early on in their career and then to see that confidence pay off. For example, with two amazing sold-out nights for Khruangbin in Paradiso, December 2020.

“Go to shows, lots of them, talk with the people at the door, at the stand, at the FOH, production staff, everyone”

What advice would you give to anyone trying to find a job in live music?
Go to shows, lots of them, talk with the people at the door, at the stand, at the FOH, production staff, everyone. Volunteer for as many things as you can sustain. Go to conferences, panels, and try to get a quick meeting in for some advice/feedback with someone that inspires you.

The pandemic has been hard on us all – are there any positive aspects that you and Friendly Fire are taking out of it?
Yes, it’s been hard but we’ve also seen relationships improve with the people we work with. We’ve tried out new things, dipped our toes into livestreaming, have unwillingly learned everything on socially distanced shows and have kept on a few of those new things.

As a new boss, what one thing would you change to make the live music industry a better place?
Several things. We should work to diversify the people we work with and in all aspects of what we do, in regards to underrepresentation.

“We have all been busy juggling shows and limitations, now it’s important that we plan for shows that are actually happening”

Also, accommodating and setting boundaries for work and personal life – although that’s been getting a lot better the past years. As a young new promoter with no network, I loved gaining managers’ and agents’ trust at that earliest stage. I believe in spreading out who you work with, so you can learn from all sorts of people.

Where do you see yourself in five years’ time?
I’d love to work on new outdoor concepts and specialise in that part of live music, as I really like the novelty of it. So far the majority of my shows were in the Netherlands, but we are doing more outside our territory now, and that’s something that I hope is going to stick.

What’s the biggest challenge for you and the Friendly Fire team now that the business is emerging from lockdown restrictions?
We have all been very busy juggling shows and limitations, now it’s important that we focus and plan a workflow for shows that are actually happening. The biggest challenge will be building up customer trust to buy tickets again.


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