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Down The Rabbit Hole on growing future headliners

Down The Rabbit Hole festival director Ide Koffeman has spoken to IQ about the event’s penchant for growing future headliners.

The 11th edition of the MOJO-promoted festival took place last weekend (5–7 July) at De Groene Heuvels near Ewijk, in the Netherlands.

All 45,000 full festival tickets were sold within 45 minutes of going on sale last December, setting a new record for the event.

Unlike most festivals, Down The Rabbit Hole exclusively sells tickets for the full three days, which Koffeman says is “part of our formula and part of the success”.

With day tickets off the table, the festival’s booking team can approach the lineup as a package, rather than three individual headline shows.

“We try to create what we call a flock of artists… so it’s not at all just about the headliner”

“We try to create what we call a flock of artists,” says Koffeman. “So it’s not at all just about the headliner. We look at what the artists stand for and the diversity of the programme and then we get a nice flock that tells a story. This year it worked out very well. I am completely satisfied and I don’t say that every year. We had a lot of great reactions as well from our audience too.”

Top-billing artists at the 2024 festival were LCD Soundsystem, The National, Michael Kiwanuka and Jungle – with the latter two delivering a co-heading slot on Friday.

“That was the first time Jungle played our festival since 2015,” says Koffeman. “And it was their first big festival headline show for 45,000 people so we were very happy they said yes. For them, it was a big step but they were happy to be presented in this way. We call them a future headliner.”

And it’s not the first time Down The Rabbit Hole has created a ‘future headliner’ at their festival.

“We had the War on Drugs headline a tent in 2015 when the festival was 15,000 capacity,” remembers Koffeman. “That was their first-ever headline show and they remembered that when they came back to headline in 2022 to 45,000 people. So look what happened in eight years.”

“We like to present acts that can do a successful show without being stadium-level”

He continues: “We like to present acts that can do a successful show without being stadium-level. With our formula, we do have room to play with the possibilities. So perhaps on Friday, we have a spectacular new act that’s a future headliner and on Saturday, a more established act. And then it all adds up and people buy tickets for the whole package. It’s like booking one big show.”

The success of the 2024 edition is particularly impressive given the backdrop of issues in the domestic and international industry – weather being a major one.

“Three weeks ahead of the festival, we noticed the rain was very bad,” Koffeman tells IQ. “The groundwater level was very high and we’re next to a big river so [the ground] is clay. There was a big question mark over parking and we had to pause the sale of parking tickets because we couldn’t guarantee spaces.”

“With our formula, we do have room to play with the possibilities”

The festival spent a great deal of time, money (and emissions, Koffeman points out) reinforcing the ground and fortunately, the weather held out for the weekend.

Generally, weather is lower down the list of issues for the Dutch industry, which is facing widespread festival cancellations largely due to rising costs, and the prospect of a huge VAT hike.

“Raising the taxes is stupid,” says Koffeman. “It’s already difficult for our festival – and we’re one of the biggest – but if you are organising a one-day festival that might make 5–6% of the total, you can just stop.

“Costs are rising so quickly and life has become more expensive in the Netherlands, so people have to make choices. Just a few festivals sold out as quickly as we did so, right now, we’re grateful for that,” he says.

 


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Euro festival preview: Rock Werchter, Open’er & more

With the European festival season in full swing, IQ is previewing what the forthcoming weekend has in store…

Dutch festival Down The Rabbit Hole (5–7 July) will welcome a sold-out crowd for its 2024 edition, after selling all 45,000 tickets in less than 45 minutes of going on sale.

The Mojo-promoted event at De Groene Heuvels near Ewijk will feature performances from the likes of LCD Soundsystem, Michael Kiwanuka, The National, Jungle, Raye, Jessie Ware and Khruangbin.

Meanwhile, hip-hop festival franchise Rolling Loud will debut in Austria (5–7) as the only European edition in 2024.

The Live Nation Germany-promoted event, dubbed Rolling Loud Europe, will take over Racino in Ebreichsdorf, an open-air venue on the outskirts of Vienna.

Nicki Minaj, Playboi Carti and Travis Scott will headline the premiere, with support from acts including Ice Spice, Shirin David and Don Toliver.

In Belgium, Rock Werchter (4–7) is already underway at Festivalpark in Werchter. The Live Nation Belgium-promoted event is headlined by Foo Fighters, Dua Lipa, Lenny Kravitz and Måneskin. Day tickets have sold out for four of the five dates.

Bombay Bicycle Club, Snow Patrol, Yungblud and Sum 41, The Last Dinner Party, Nothing But Thieves, Avril Lavigne and Khruangbin, Michael Kiwanuka, Arlo Parks and Royal Blood will also perform at Belgium’s biggest festival over the coming days.

Hip-hop festival franchise Rolling Loud will debut in Austria this weekend

Dua Lipa and Foo Fighters are also headlining Open’er (3–6) on the north coast of Poland, in Gdynia, alongside Doja Cat.

Addition acts for the Alter Art-promoted event include Hozier, Charli XCX, Don Toliver, Måneskin, Disclosure, Ashnikko, 21 Savage, Ice Spice, Air, Loyle Carner, Michael Kiwanuka, Floating Points, Kim Gordon, Tom Morello, Sampha and Slowdive.

Ruisrock (5–7), the second oldest rock festival in Europe, will once again take over the national park of Ruissalo in Turku, Finland this weekend.

The Chainsmokers, Hardwell, Disclosure, PMMP and Stormzy are top are top billing for the 2024 edition, which will host up to 35,000 people a day.

Elsewhere, electronic music festival Balaton Sound (3–6) is afoot on the beach in Zamárdi, Hungary.

Marshmello, Alison Wonderland, Adam Beyer, Amelie Lens and Timmy Trumpet are among the acts performing at the event, organised by the team behind Sziget in Budapest.

Other festivals taking place this weekend include Electric Love Festival (AU), Lovely Days Festival (AU), Lytham Festival (UK), Les Eurockéennes de Belfort (FR), Awakenings Summer Festival (NL), Love Supreme Jazz Festival (UK) and Comfort Festival (IT).

 


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The secret behind North Sea Jazz’s 47-year legacy

NN North Sea Jazz director Jan Willem Luyken has spoken to IQ about the secret behind the Dutch festival’s decades-long legacy.

The 47th edition of the MOJO-promoted event will take place at Rotterdam Ahoy between 12–14 July with 150 acts including Sting, Raye, André 3000, Corinne Bailey Rae, Masego, Sampha, Noname, Jessie Ware and Jamie Cullum.

With the Saturday and Sunday of the 30,000-capacity festival already sold out, and around 2,000 tickets remaining for Friday, Luyken expects another banner year for the event.

According to the director, the festival’s enduring success is largely due to its eclectic lineups, which draw a broad and diverse audience.

“The founder of the festival, Mr Paul Acket, was a very eclectic and broadminded guy – he was a real jazz guy, but also a smart businessman and above all, a famous concert promotor in The Netherlands,” explains Luyken. “So he decided to have jazz as the basis of the programme, as well as some big names to sell the tickets to the non-jazz audience. The first editions featured Ray Charles, Van Morrison and Chaka Khan.

“We have to make sure the jazz fans are happy but you need the big names too, to stay connected to other audiences”

“Almost 50 years later, the basic concept is still the same. But of course, the music is always on the move and I think it’s very important that we keep track of new trends and bands, so we have a very skilled and experienced programme committee team that has weekly meetings. The good thing is that we have 16 stages so we can do it all – from the classics to the contemporary.”

While the festival’s spectrum of genres has evolved over the years (see last year’s edition headlined by Stormzy), Luyken says that attracting jazz fans is an ongoing priority.

“We always ask ourselves, ‘If you take away the crossover or pop stuff, is this still a good jazz festival?’ and I think it is. It’s one of the strongest jazz festivals in the world. We have to make sure the jazz fans are happy and that they want to buy tickets but of course, you need the big names too, to stay connected to other audiences. It’s this broad setup that’s the success of the festival.”

North Sea’s wide-ranging lineups also mean the festival has no problem offering an ethnically diverse and gender-balanced bill.

“This was always the case, since the 70s,” says Luyken. “Nowadays people demand [diverse lineups] but it’s not new for us, it was always there organically. The founder’s basic philosophy for the festival was to have enough good music for all people and that automatically makes a diverse festival – when it’s a structural thing.”

“We’re the right weekend, that we can afford good headliners”

North Sea Jazz’s broad programming also means that the reported lack of available headliners isn’t an issue for the bookers, as there’s a bigger pool of A-list acts to choose from.

“Plus we’re the right weekend, that we can afford good headliners,” adds Luyken. “If you’re in the second part of June and the first part of July, you traditionally have the best chance of booking big acts.”

Taking place in an indoor venue has also proved to be an advantage for North Sea Jazz, as festivals grapple with the impacts of severe weather – though there are some downsides to it.

“We are seeing the limits of our venue,” says Luyken. “We’re not a big outdoors festival that can sell 60,000 or 70,000 tickets. We are limited to 30,000 a day.”

With the 16-stage festival unable to expand, the organisers have looked to offset rising costs in other ways.

“We have a very well-developed hospitality and VIP offering which is doing very well and we depend a lot of external funding and commercial sponsoring – which is popular for us.”

He continues: “Besides rising artist fees and the stuff we have to deal with every year, there have been no big challenges here. And I know we’re very lucky because a lot of festivals out there are struggling,” he says. “It’s a tricky business but we are in a comfortable position. And you have to work very hard and have a lot of luck to get in this position.”

 


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At least 60 Dutch festivals cancelled in 2024

At least 60 Dutch festivals have been cancelled this year, according to national press.

This figure marks a record number of festival cancellations – excluding the Covid pandemic years – writes AD. In addition, only 30 new festivals have been introduced.

In the last week, the UB40-headlined Chillville in Breda was cancelled at the last minute due to “a major shortage of event materials and personnel” and Mañana Mañana in Gelderland, promoted by Superstruct-backed Feestfabriek (Party Factory), announced that it would not return after its 10th edition as “ticket sales are not enough to make the event profitable”.

In addition to rising costs and a shortage of resources, many organisers are grappling with changing municipal and national policies.

Psy-Fi Festival in Oldenzaal suddenly had to pull the plug because the municipality “made a complete change in the zoning plan,” causing the festival to run into serious time constraints.

The BouleVaart festival in Krommenie also had to deal with stricter regulations; in addition to an event permit, an environmental permit and acoustic research were suddenly required. “Everything has made organising more difficult, I don’t think we will ever do it again,” said the organiser.

In addition to rising costs and a shortage of resources, organisers are grappling with changing municipal and national policies

Meanwhile, Amsterdam festival organisers fear that the city’s new permit policy, set to be trialled next year, could lead to bankruptcies.

Set to come into effect in 2026, the new policy aims to give new and smaller events a better chance of getting scarce festival locations in order to “better meet the needs of all Amsterdam residents”.

Events councillor Touria Meliani wants to set up a committee that will determine who gets a place based on substantive criteria. By the end of this year, events would know whether they have a place on next year’s calendar.

Festivals including DGTL, Amsterdam Open Air, De Zon, Loveland and Zeezout have hit back, saying the approach is “too late” and “unworkable” for both new and established festivals.

“You cannot organise a safe and successful festival in six months,” the organisers wrote in a full-page advertisement addressed to the municipality and published in Het Parool last month.

The organisers have launched a petition against the new policy, which has been signed by 18,613 people at the time of writing.

Another major issue on the horizon is the government’s plans to raise the tax rate for the cultural and creative sector from 9% to 21%, which has also prompted a coalition of organisations to launch a joint campaign asking it to reconsider.

“The festival offering is always changing. The audience too. Taste changes, people enter a different phase of their lives”

A statement from the coalition reads: “The proposed increase in the VAT rate will inevitably lead to higher prices, which will put pressure on the accessibility and affordability of sports, media, books, culture and catering for the public. It affects everyone in the Netherlands in daily life and in several areas. It is an additional burden on the valuable free time, club life, curiosity and (mental) health of every Dutch person.”

Despite a raft of major challenges facing the Dutch live music industry, Berend Schans of the Association of Dutch Music Venues and Festivals (VNPF) says there’s no immediate need to panic.

“The festival offering is always changing. The audience too. Taste changes, people enter a different phase of their lives.”

Schans also points to festivals and concerts that sold out very quickly despite the higher prices, such as Lowlands (€325 for a weekend ticket) and AC/DC (€170 for a standing room).

The Dutch festival market isn’t the only one that’s been hit by a high number of festival cancellations. The UK has seen over 40 festivals shut down, while Australia’s festival scene declared a crisis earlier this year.

 


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Campaign launched against Dutch ticket tax hike

A coalition of organisations in the Netherlands have launched a joint campaign against the government’s plans to raise the tax rate for the cultural and creative sector from 9% to 21%.

A full-page advert appeared in every national and regional newspaper today (3 June) with the message #nohigherebtw (nohigherVAT) on behalf of the alliance, which includes the Association of Dutch Music Venues and Festivals’ (VNPF), as well as other groups across culture, media, catering, books and sports.

It follows proposals unveiled by the country’s new right-wing government to increase the VAT rate for concert, festival, sports and museum tickets, as well as books, hotels and newspapers, by 12 percentage points from 2026. The sector contributes €26 billion (3.4%) annually to the Netherlands’ GDP and accounts for almost one in 20 jobs in the Netherlands.

A statement from the coalition reads: “The proposed increase in the VAT rate will inevitably lead to higher prices, which will put pressure on the accessibility and affordability of sports, media, books, culture and catering for the public. It affects everyone in the Netherlands in daily life and in several areas. It is an additional burden on the valuable free time, club life, curiosity and (mental) health of every Dutch person.”

The government says the increase will generate €2.2bn a year for the treasury, but campaigners say it will add 11% to the price of tickets. According to Dutch News, the measure is also the least popular of all the plans unveiled by the new coalition, with just over half of those polled opposed to the move and only 28% supporting it.

A total of 96% of respondents to a poll conducted by trade bodies Arts ’92 and The Creative Coalition said ticket prices will have to increase if the lower VAT rate is abolished, while research by economist René Goudriaan suggested the subsequent drop in visitors would most severely impact festivals (1.5 million fewer annual visits), resulting in €62.5 million less income.

“This increase in tax burden affects everyone: readers, festivalgoers, museum visitors, artists, musical fans, people who sing in choirs and play in brass bands,” says Arts ’92 director Astrid Weij. “In this way, what gives life colour and meaning takes a hit. The economy behind the creative sector is going to shrink. The effects on our prosperity, well-being and employment are negative.”

“The VAT increase is a serious setback for self-employed people and employees. Many fear forced layoffs”

“The proposed VAT increase is a blow to self-employed people and employees in the sector,” adds Thomas Drissen, director of The Creative Coalition. “It puts further pressure on the income of the makers. Many have not yet recovered from the corona years, when there was actually a professional ban. The VAT increase is a serious setback for self-employed people and employees. Many fear forced layoffs.”

Dutch live music association the VNPF has previously called on the authorities to reconsider the tax hike, warning it could have grave consequences for the domestic live music business.

“This measure makes ticket sales uncertain, leading to less investment in a sector that has already been hit disproportionately hard in recent years,” it said. “The jobs of more than 100,000 people working in this industry are also threatened.

“In addition, this VAT increase weakens the competitive position of the Dutch live music sector compared to neighbouring countries where low rates are still charged. Stages and festivals lose their offer to neighbouring countries, with all the financial consequences that entails. This policy puts the Dutch world-leading live sector at a great disadvantage.”

It continued: “Pop culture in the Netherlands is becoming less accessible, causing a broad audience to be excluded from cultural events. This makes the Netherlands less attractive for international artists, which has a negative impact on the business climate in this industry.

“The consequences extend beyond just the visitors – up-and-coming pop talent will find it even more difficult to break through and generate a sustainable income.”

Other groups to have signed up to the coalition include Dutch football association KNVB, the country’s top professional football league the Eredivisie, the Association of Theater and Concert Hall Directors (VSCD), Association of Event Makers (VVEM), the Alliance of Event Builders, the Association of Dutch Orchestras (VvNO), the Creative Industry Federation, the Culture Federation, the Pop Coalition and the Dutch Association of Journalists (NVJ).

 


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Amsterdam festivals fear bankruptcy over new policy

Amsterdam festival organisers have launched a campaign against the city’s new permit policy which they say could lead to bankruptcies.

Set to come into effect in 2026, the new policy aims to give new and smaller events a better chance of getting scarce festival locations in order to ‘better meet the needs of all Amsterdam residents’.

However, a test run is being planned for next year as locations for events will be scarcer than normal due to Amsterdam’s 750th-anniversary celebrations and the return of Dutch boat festival Sail.

In order to distribute the places more fairly, events councillor Touria Meliani wants to set up a committee that will determine who gets a place based on substantive criteria. By the end of this year, festivals would know whether they have a place on next year’s calendar.

Festivals including DGTL, Amsterdam Open Air, De Zon, Loveland and Zeezout have hit back, saying the approach is “too late” and “unworkable” for both new and established festivals.

“You cannot organise a safe and successful festival in six months,” the organisers wrote in a full-page advertisement addressed to the municipality and published in Het Parool last week.

“Organisers that do not obtain a permit will go bankrupt”

“Organisers who are given a place cannot organise their event properly. Many costs have already been incurred for the longer-running major festivals. Organisers that do not obtain a permit will go bankrupt.”

The organisers are calling for the 2024 events calendar to be replicated for 2025 so that “everyone knows where they stand and new initiatives can flourish”.

In addition, organisers have resurrected the action group Unmute Us, which was founded during Covid-19 to organise protests and campaigns against government policy and draw attention to the needs of the Dutch live music sector.

The group has launched a petition against the new policy, which has been signed by 13,900 people at the time of writing.

“The Amsterdam municipal council wrongly states that there are too many applications for too few locations and does not take into account the position that certain festivals have had in the city for years,” reads the petition. “This creates enormous uncertainty for all festivals, which could have disastrous consequences for many.”

Meanwhile, the wider Dutch industry is calling on the government to reconsider its plans to raise the VAT rate for concert and festival tickets by 12 percentage points.

The increase from 9% to 21%, which is set to come into effect from 2026, was announced last week in the new coalition agreement between the PVV, VVD, NSC and BBB parties.

 


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Dutch groups hit out at live music VAT rate hike

The Association of Dutch Music Venues and Festivals’ (VNPF) is calling on the government to reconsider its plans to raise the VAT rate for concert and festival tickets by 12 percentage points.

The increase from 9% to 21%, which is set to come into effect from 2026, was announced this week in the new coalition agreement between the PVV, VVD, NSC and BBB parties.

But the national live music trade body is warning the move could have dire consequences for the domestic business, and is appealing for talks with the powers that be.

“This measure makes ticket sales uncertain, leading to less investment in a sector that has already been hit disproportionately hard in recent years,” it says. “The jobs of more than 100,000 people working in this industry are also threatened.

“In addition, this VAT increase weakens the competitive position of the Dutch live music sector compared to neighbouring countries where low rates are still charged. Stages and festivals lose their offer to neighbouring countries, with all the financial consequences that entails. This policy puts the Dutch world-leading live sector at a great disadvantage.”

Stressing that a healthy cultural sector is “essential” for the country’s economy, the VNPF says the impact on the tax hike would be felt on and off the stage.

“The consequences extend beyond just the visitors – up-and-coming pop talent will find it even more difficult to break through and generate a sustainable income”

“Pop culture in the Netherlands is becoming less accessible, causing a broad audience to be excluded from cultural events,” it continues. “This makes the Netherlands less attractive for international artists, which has a negative impact on the business climate in this industry.

“The consequences extend beyond just the visitors – up-and-coming pop talent will find it even more difficult to break through and generate a sustainable income.”

The Association of Event Makers (VVEM) has also shared its “major concerns” at the proposal.

“This increase is bad news for consumers,” says the group. “A decision like this also has far-reaching consequences for Dutch artists, who see the gap with their audience growing, but also for entrepreneurs in the events industry.”

A four-party coalition deal was provisionally struck this week to form a right-wing government, almost six months after PVV leader Geert Wilders won the Dutch election.

“The VVEM suspects that the new government has not realised that a measure like this will hit ordinary Dutch people who like to go to events hard,” it adds. “The flywheel effect is that the business climate in the industry is also hit hard. We would like to enter into discussions with a new government to convince them not to take this measure.”

 


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Rotterdam stadium paid millions to stop hosting concerts

A Rotterdam stadium will reportedly receive ‘millions’ in compensation after it was ordered to stop hosting concerts.

Feyenoord Stadium (also known as De Kuip) has hosted concerts from the likes of Madonna, Michael Jackson, The Rolling Stones, U2 and Rammstein.

From 2026, the 51,177-capacity venue will no longer be permitted to host concerts due to the construction of new homes in the local area.

The local municipality says the sound insulation required for the properties is too expensive so it is, instead, opting to compensate the stadium for the loss of concerts.

“Many people have great memories of a concert in De Kuip but we have a social responsibility to be a good neighbour”

The last major concerts at De Kuip took place in 2019 with Rammstein and Marco Borsato, however, just six months ago the stadium director announced ambitions to revive the venue’s concert programme.

“Of course, it is a shame that we can no longer facilitate pop concerts,” says director Lilian De Leeuw. “Many people have great memories of a concert in De Kuip but we have a social responsibility to be a good neighbour.

“With the one-off compensation, we now ensure future-proof, healthy business operations and we remain a solid home base for Feyenoord, also financially.”

De Leeuw says the stadium, which is home to Dutch football team Feyenoord Rotterdam, now hopes to host an increased number of national and international matches.

 


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Eric van Eerdenburg reveals Lowlands exit strategy

Lowlands director Eric van Eerdenburg has revealed his intention to step down from the Dutch festival next year.

Van Eerdenburg has been involved with the long-running event, which is promoted by Live Nation’s Mojo Concerts, since the turn of the century. But Vpro reports that he has now set the wheels in motion for his “process to the back door”.

“I’m not quitting yet, but I’ve started quitting, so to speak,” Van Eerdenburg told the De Machine podcast. “I will definitely do this Lowlands again and next year too. And someone will walk with me to take over afterwards.

“Lowlands is big, Lowlands is a lot. There is a lot of networking involved, which you don’t write down on a note and say, ‘Good luck with it.’ So I chose to do it that way.”

He continued: “Lowlands is a young festival. It’s about young culture, young new bands, new influences, new things. There you can think for a long time that you still feel it all the way down to your toes, but at a certain point that is no longer the case.”

“I’m not ready to wave goodbye to everyone yet”

Van Eerdenburg plans to hand over the reins to Mojo’s festival project manager Camiel le Rutte, who works across events such as Rolling Loud, Stadspark Live and Warehouse Project Rotterdam, and previously programmed Amsterdam’s Melkweg venue.

“He has also done things as a freelancer at Lowlands in the past,” said Van Eerdenburg. “I think he is the right man to take over this. He is now 38, 39, a good age to start. The same age as when I started.”

He added: “I’m not ready to wave goodbye to everyone yet.”

The 2024 edition of A Campingflight to Lowlands Paradise will be held in Biddinghuizen between 16-18 August. Acts at the 60,000-cap festival will include Fred Again.., Queens of the Stone Age, Skrillex, Peggy Gou, Froukje, The Smile, Nas, Denzel Curry, Jorja Smith, Sugababes, Big Thief and Wargasm. Tickets, priced €325, sold out within 15 minutes of going on sale in February.

Van Eerdenburg joined the festival team in 2000 as right-hand man to MD John Mulder, becoming director the following year. Mulder himself stepped down from Mojo at the start of 2024 to “give the young guard space”. The new leadership team consists of Ruben Brouwer, with whom Mulder has co-led Mojo since 2017, as well as Ronny Hooch Antink and Kim Bloem.

 


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Man sentenced for hanging grenade on festival fence

A man has been sentenced to two years in prison for attaching a grenade to a fence at Dutch festival Electronic Picnic.

The incident took place in Leeghwaterpark, in the municipality of Purmerend, on the evening of 14 July 2023.

“At the beginning of the evening, one of our security guards found a suspicious object outside the festival site,” the event organisers said at the time. “We immediately cordoned off the area and informed the authorities. They responded alertly and through good cooperation the object was secured. We now know that this had nothing to do with the festival.”

The Explosive Ordnance Disposal Service removed the grenade, which was secured with a tie-wrap, and the festival continued as normal.

The court is still unclear on the man’s motive for hanging the grenade

Shortly afterwards, the 26-year-old man from Edam-Volendam was arrested in his home.

The court noted that the man created a life-threatening situation: “If someone were to remove the hand grenade by pulling on it, the safety pin with the pull ring would remain on the tie-wrap, which would have detonated the grenade.”

The court is still unclear about the man’s motive for hanging the grenade, though the man’s lawyer indicated that his client was suffering from a “drug psychosis” at the time.

In addition to the prison sentence – eight months of which are conditional – the man will receive a probationary period of two years.

More than 30 artists performed across three stages at Electronic Picnic 2023, which was the 11th edition of the festival.

 


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