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The LGBTIQ+ List 2022: Natalie Rudland, Live Nation

The LGBTIQ+ List 2022 – IQ Magazine’s second annual celebration of queer professionals who make an immense impact in the international live music business – was published in the Pride edition (issue 112) last month.

The July 2022 issue, which is available to read now, was made possible thanks to support from Ticketmaster. 

To get to know this year’s queer pioneers a little better, we interviewed each individual on their challenges, triumphs, advice and more.

Throughout the next month, IQ will publish a new interview each day. Catch up on the previous interview with Nikos Kalozeas, a music agent at UTA in the UK.

The series continues with Natalie Rudland (she/her/hers), senior promotions assistant at Live Nation UK.

 


Tell us about a personal triumph in your career.
Returning to work full-time after having my son was a huge personal triumph. My wife and I underwent IVF treatment just before Covid hit and we were in lockdown throughout my pregnancy and I gave birth in September 2020. The whole experience was bizarre, being locked up at home for the whole nine months. I felt extremely lucky to be so heavily supported by Live Nation throughout.

Returning to work after maternity leave filled me with crippling anxiety and I think being at home since March 2020 and going through a huge personal life change such as becoming a mum was slightly overwhelming, to say the least. I would sit up late at night and panic about the decision to return, whether I could be both a good employee and mum. I envisioned only being able to be 50% of the employee I once was; I thought I would be seen as someone who chose family over their career (ridiculous I know) and would be treated as such.

I feel so proud to have got into the swing of working mum life and to have returned to a company so supportive of new parents. Live Nation has given me the space I need to settle back into the role whilst always being there to support and encourage me as my career continues to progress and flourish.

“Never make yourself smaller for anyone”

What advice could you give to young queer professionals?
Never make yourself smaller for anyone. Be loud and proud about who you are and never accept anyone taking you for anything less. Surround yourself with people who empower and inspire you. I think enjoying the journey and knowing that it’s never linear is key. Make mistakes and learn from them. And always remember it’s okay to move on from opportunities that no longer fill your cup.

What’s the best mistake you’ve ever made?
I won’t get into the time I sent around a company email with “Sorry for any incontinence” instead of “Sorry for any inconvenience” – that was a very bad day! I think my best ‘mistake’ was having a case of word vomit with a previous boss. Before I joined Live Nation I worked at a talent agency, it was my first job out of university and was an incredible opportunity. I was there for around four years before I realised that I wanted to move on and try my hand at something new.

I remember oversharing with my boss at the time that I was no longer happy and was desperate to leave the company and move on. I came away from his office that day asking myself why on earth I was so honest about it, and if I was too honest about it. I was utterly convinced he would fire me that day or ask HR [human resources] to exit me, as someone who was not fully committed to the company. At the time I thought it was a huge mistake to open up.

A little while later, the same boss came to me with a job opening he had heard about at Live Nation, he got me in touch with the right people and made sure an interview was arranged. And that’s how I ended up working at Live Nation – mistakenly oversharing. Now looking back, I realise that it’s a fantastic thing to be able to have open and honest conversations with your line managers, I’m so thankful to that boss (who may be reading this, hello).

“My personal experience as a lesbian in the industry has always been great and I have never felt like I need to hide who I am”

Tell us about a professional challenge you’ve come across as a queer person in the industry.
The need to ‘come out’ to new people constantly can be a little awkward, especially when new people ask about my son. I have had a few “So who’s the dad?” or people referring to our sperm donor as the “father”. I wouldn’t say that is industry specific of course, people are naturally curious and often don’t know what terms to use.

I’m always more than happy and often excited to chat about it and our journey of becoming a two-mum family. Besides that, I work with incredibly inclusive, diverse, and wonderfully kind people. My personal experience as a lesbian in the industry has always been great and I have never felt like I need to hide who I am in order to progress and succeed.

One thing the live industry could do to be a more inclusive place?
Give more queer artists and industry professionals the platforms to continue to thrive and excel. Our industry is moving in the right direction to support, protect and project queer people, it needs to keep going, keep pushing and keep being a safe space for people to be their true authentic selves.

“I’m dying to see Lil Nas X, I reckon I could recite to you the whole Montero album word for word”

A cause you support
There is a wonderful charity called Mermaids that supports non-binary, transgender and gender-diverse children and youth. I have been a huge supporter of their work for a long time. Our children are our future, and the young people in the UK today are such a special, strong, passionate generation. I love that there are organisations like Mermaids that support young people through the journey of exploration of their gender identity, free from judgement, fear and isolation. Let’s keep learning from our youth, listening to them and always providing safe, loving spaces for them to be themselves.

The queer act you’re itching to see live this year
Ashnikko hands down is my number one. I missed her earlier this year and was kicking myself. When that opportunity arises again I’m first in line – her genre-bending, infectious earworms are on a constant loop in my headphones. I’m also dying to see Lil Nas X, I reckon I could recite to you the whole Montero album word for word, it’s my go-to to get me in a great mood.

Your favourite queer space 
The Royal Vauxhall Tavern is host to a wonderful array of alternative entertainment. It’s always a super fun night out, and often quite ridiculous. The staff there have created a beautifully inclusive, safe space. Mighty Hoopla is another brilliant space for queer people. The festival is an explosion of glitter, pop, colour and drag. It’s infectiously camp, couldn’t recommend it enough.

 


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LN Q2 results: live biz back ‘bigger than ever’

Live Nation CEO Michael Rapino has declared the live business is back “bigger than ever”, with the company’s Q2 financials showing 2022 ticket sales are outperforming pre-pandemic levels.

LN’s share price had risen 12% in the last month in anticipation of yesterday’s results, and closed at $97.63 last night.

The firm attained its highest quarterly attendance ever, attracting more than 33 million fans across 12,500 events, as revenue soared to $4.4 billion – up 40% on the same period in 2019. In addition, operating income was up 86% to $319 million, while AOI rose 50% to $480m.

“We have sold over 100 million tickets for our concerts this year, more than we sold for the entire year in 2019”

“The second quarter confirmed that live entertainment industry is back globally and bigger than ever,” says Rapino. “Live Nation led this return and continues to deliver the best global network to support artists as they play shows for the fans around the world.

“We have sold over 100 million tickets for our concerts this year, more than we sold for the entire year in 2019.”

Ticketmaster also delivered another record quarter, with AOI up 86% and transacted GTV increasing 76%. The figures account for the three months ending 30 June.

“Ticketing had another very successful quarter, delivering $231 million of AOI, making it the most profitable quarter ever for ticketing, beating the record set just last year in the fourth quarter and nearly doubling the Q2 2019 AOI results of $124m,” says CFO Joe Berchtold. “Our growth came from both primary and secondary ticketing with transacted ticketing GTV up 69% and 141%, respectively.”

Berchtold suggests that indications are pointing towards “a very strong Q3 for concerts”, with more shows and a higher attendance.

“As we prepare for 2023… we are actively routing into all markets with the largest artist pipeline we have ever seen at this point in the year”

Rapino adds that next year is shaping up to be a similarly impressive year.

“As we prepare for 2023, everywhere globally is open for concerts, and we are actively routing into all markets with the largest artist pipeline we have ever seen at this point in the year,” says Rapino. “For the 2023 tours we have put on sale so far, all signs continue pointing to strong fan demand.”

Amid the controversy over “dynamic” ticket prices for Bruce Springsteen’s 2023 tour, where the top priced tickets surpassed $5,000, Rapino reports that market-based pricing is being widely adopted by most tours.

“We expect to shift over 500 million from the secondary market to artists this year, continuing to support those who created the concert and ensuring they are benefiting from it,” he says.

“We work for the artist. Our job is to provide all the tools, platform and services to help them succeed in that tour”

Rapino elaborated further on the issue when speaking to investors during yesterday’s earning call.

“We’ve been saying for a few years that over time, we believe that that secondary [ticketing] $10 billion, $12 billion, depending on what number you see globally, has to start getting captured by the artist at some level,” he said. “It’s just too transparent. The more they see all of the online pricing while they work so hard to put that show on. So… artists are looking at us saying, ‘I’d like to count some of it in the front end. I don’t want to be sold out at 10.01am at $200 to have someone else make $2,000.’

“Fans are not getting a deal anyway, they’re spending $2,000 from somebody else. So I do think they’re looking and saying, ‘the front of the house, can we capture some demand?'”

“We’ve got a global product and we’ve got lots of opportunity to keep growing”

He added: “We work for the artist. We’re a B2B business. Our job is to provide all the tools, platform and services to help them succeed in that tour.

“They’re genius brand managers. They have to balance the needs of their fans, supply, demand and pricing. And some brands, like the Rolling Stones, have been very good at always saying expensive experience and we’re that proud and enable to deliver that brand position. But I think artists are always trying to find a fine line on how do I make the show accessible? How do I make sure all my fans can show? How do I price it fairly versus how much money can I make? So I think they see that.

“Today, while the technology is advancing and they’re starting to look at more technology and more pricing data, I think they can now [price] 1-2% of the house higher and achieve some of those economics versus the scalper, while still pricing 98% of the house at a very stable brand position. So we can achieve both.”

Rapino also addressed the company’s global strategy in the wake of recent moves in Thailand and the Philippines.

“We look at Asia as really undeveloped territory, low market share, huge opportunity,” he said. “Like everyone else in the world, we look at Asia, we look at Latin America, and we’re looking to the Middle East and Eastern Europe as areas where we have no real market share. But that consumer now on TikTok knows that Drake dropped the video last night, whether they live in Singapore, India, Cape Town. So we’ve got a global product, and we’ve got lots of opportunity to keep growing.”

 


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The LGBTIQ+ List 2022: Jill Wheeler, Red Mountain

The LGBTIQ+ List 2022 – IQ Magazine’s second annual celebration of queer professionals who make an immense impact in the international live music business – was published in the Pride edition (issue 112) last month.

The July 2022 issue, which is available to read now, was made possible thanks to support from Ticketmaster. 

To get to know this year’s queer pioneers a little better, we interviewed each individual on their challenges, triumphs, advice and more.

Throughout the next month, IQ will publish a new interview each day. Catch up on the previous interview with James Fleury, marketing lead at TicketSwap in the Netherlands.

The series continues with Jill Wheeler (she/her/hers), promoter at Red Mountain Entertainment/Live Nation in the US.


Tell us about a personal triumph in your career
A huge accomplishment in my career thus far has to be bringing Van Morrison to Birmingham [Alabama] for the first time.

What advice could you give to young queer professionals?
Always be true to yourself. Work hard, show up on time, but never forget who you are.

Tell us about a professional challenge you’ve come across as a queer person in the industry
I haven’t experienced challenges due to being a queer person, but there are many we all still face as women. We still live in a man’s world.

“I haven’t experienced challenges due to being a queer person, but there are many we all still face as women”

One thing the live industry could do to be a more inclusive place
The industry could be a more inclusive place by targeting the entire queer community in all advertising for all shows – not just gay shows. We come in all stripes. It would also be beneficial to provide gender-neutral bathrooms in all places of work and beyond.

A cause you support
I support many causes and organisations, such as the Yellowhammer Fund (which is an Alabama-based women’s clinic), Suicide Prevention for Teens, and feeding our local food-insecure families.

The queer act you’re itching to see live this year
Perfume Genius.

Your favourite queer space
Bonnaroo – a festival that always makes space for the queer community!

 


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Giddings on Lady Gaga’s seminal stadium run

John Giddings has told IQ how the European leg of Lady Gaga’s rescheduled worldwide stadium tour triumphed over prevailing issues.

More than 280,000 tickets sold for the six-date leg of The Chromatica Ball, which wrapped last weekend with two sold-out shows at Tottenham Hotspur stadium (cap. 62,850) in London.

The Live Nation-promoted tour, which also visited stadiums in Germany, Sweden, France and the Netherlands, marked the first-ever public live performances of Gaga’s #1 selling and Grammy-award-winning album Chromatica (2020).

“The show is incredible and everyone was blown away,” says Giddings, who worked as the European tour coordinator for Live Nation. “She’s proved herself to be a world-class superstar and this is her coming of age.

“Selling 280,000 tickets is fantastic,” he continues. “After the pandemic, you’re a) worried about selling tickets and b) worried that the people who have bought tickets either won’t come or will ask for a refund because they’ve got Covid. So it was a fantastic success to have all these people turn up.”

While Gaga’s packed venues bucked the no-show trend that some tours are still experiencing, the Solo boss says the European leg faced some of the same challenges, from staff shortages to illnesses to production costs.

“The problems of touring are two or three times worse than they were before the pandemic”

“First of all, you’ve got Brexit, so you have to import and export to each country,” he explains. “Then there’s the pandemic to go with it because – remember – countries like Germany are still a bit behind and you have to wear masks on planes and things like that.”

Countering the ongoing prevalence of Covid-19, the tour required crew to take a test and put on a mask before going backstage. “It was like the old days in the UK when you couldn’t walk down the road without taking a test first,” he says.

Add in the rising cost of fuel (which Giddings says costs at least a third more than it did pre-pandemic) and uncertainty around cancelled planes and trains, and The Chromatica Ball became a triumph over adversity.

The outcome, Giddings says, was an “incredibly successful tour” which garnered glowing reviews across the board. VICE said Gaga’s London show was “a once-in-a-lifetime artist playing a once-in-a-lifetime show” while NME hailed it “a thrilling, high-concept return from pop’s finest” and Evening Standard says it was “as perfect as a performance gets”.

The tour even broke some personal records for Gaga, who performed for her largest audience to date – 78,500 attendees – at Paris’ Stade de France.

But it was the shows at Tottenham Hotspur stadium that proved to be the standout dates for the Isle of Wight boss. “I have to give a gold star to Tottenham Hotspur stadium because it was fantastic and they really looked after us well,” says Giddings. “There was brilliant sound and the production looked incredible in there. The way it was built is perfect for a show.”

The Chromatica Ball tour continues across North America and Asia for 14 more shows with stadium stops in Canada, the US and Japan.

 


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Live Nation, 88rising add to Asia festival boom

Live Nation and 88rising are the latest promoters to announce new events in Asia, buoying a festival boom on the continent.

The news comes shortly after Rolling Loud announced plans to expand its hip-hop franchise to Thailand in 2023, and Lollapalooza revealed intentions to launch in Mumbai early next year.

Live Nation’s contribution to the uptick is a one-day urban festival in Tokyo, Japan, in collaboration with the country’s leading promoter Creativeman.

Tonal Tokyo will take place at the Ariake Arena (cap. 15,000) on 29 October this year, featuring a mix of domestic and international acts.

Charli XCX, Jamie xx, Years & Years and Lany are among the artists slated to perform across the main arena and the sub arena.

“We aim to create a new-generational music festival that brings together the diverse sounds and colours of Tokyo”

“This autumn, a new urban festival will be born in our Tokyo. Tonal means ‘timbre’ or ‘colour’. We aim to create a new-generational music festival that brings together the diverse sounds and colours of Tokyo and sends them out from Tokyo to the world,” says the event’s organisers.

Tickets for Tonal Tokyo go on sale on 3 September, with general admission billed at ¥16,500 (€123) and VIP tickets going for ¥30,000 (€224).

Elsewhere, Asian-American music powerhouse 88rising is preparing to bring its US-festival Head in the Clouds to Jakarta, Indonesia, this winter.

The festival will take place at Community Park PIK2 on 3 and 4 December, featuring performances from “artists around the world” – though the line-up is yet to be announced.

Head in the Clouds Jakarta will follow the California edition on 10 and 11 August, which is co-produced with AEG Presents.

Jackson Wang, Jay Park, Rich Brian, MILLI, Chung Ha, eaJ and Bibi are among the artists slated to perform in Los Angeles.

 


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Mark Vaughan to head up LN’s promoter team in Oz/Nz

Live Nation has appointed Mark Vaughan as vice president of talent and artist development for Australia and New Zealand.

In his new role, Vaughan will head up the promoter team in the two markets as they continue to manage a growing pipeline of tours in the region.

Australia-born Vaughan is a long-time promoter who has spent most of his career working in Europe. He was previously based in Oslo as a partner/promoter at Nordic live entertainment powerhouse All Things Live.

Roger Field, president of Live Nation Asia Pacific, comments: “Bringing in a world-class promoter like Mark Vaughan is a great addition to our Live Nation team as he brings in-depth knowledge of Australia, New Zealand and the global touring market, especially as artists continue expanding their tours around the world. Mark has a proven track record of delivering hit tours for huge artists, and we look forward to him continuing that success at Live Nation and welcoming him home.”

“Mark has a proven track record of delivering hit tours for huge artists”

Vaughan adds: “For a long time I have been closely following the live market in Australia and New Zealand and admiring the work of Live Nation. The team are delivering a stellar roster and growing number of tours from entry-level club acts to stadium artists, and it’s super exciting to come back home and lead a talented, successful and dynamic promoter team.”

Vaughan will be relocating to Melbourne and starting with Live Nation on 1 August, working alongside Live Nation’s existing promoter team.

Live Nation Concerts’ talent and touring team handles hundreds of tours each year across Australia and New Zealand, and the globe, working with artists including Crowded House, Dua Lipa, Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Drake, U2, Jay-Z, Post Malone, Billie Eilish, BTS, Pink, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, BTS, and many more.

 


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Toby Leighton-Pope named MD of TEG Europe

Live music veteran Toby Leighton-Pope has been appointed managing director of the newly formed TEG Europe.

Leighton-Pope will oversee the operation, strategic direction and rapid expansion of the UK-based arm of Australia’s live entertainment powerhouse.

He was previously co-CEO of AEG Presents UK from 2016 to December 2021 and spent the prior 16 years at Live Nation, latterly as senior vice president music.

Leighton-Pope has worked with the likes of The Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Arcade Fire, Michael Buble and Katy Perry.

He is also responsible for launching the Hard Rock Calling Festival in Hyde Park, for which he booked artists including Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Paul Simon and The Who.

“Toby’s outstanding record in the live entertainment industry speaks for itself”

TEG CEO Geoff Jones welcomed Leighton-Pope to the global TEG Family, saying: “Toby’s outstanding record in the live entertainment industry speaks for itself. His ideas, connections, and infectious enthusiasm make him the perfect choice to lead the further expansion of TEG’s successful integrated model into the vibrant UK and European markets.”

Leighton-Pope adds: “I am thrilled to join TEG as managing director of TEG Europe. In the past decade, Geoff and his team have built TEG from Australia’s leading ticketing company, Ticketek, into an increasingly global and leading player in live entertainment, ticketing, venue, digital and data.

“I am thrilled to be working with the talented and passionate TEG Europe Team including Richard Buck [the former CEO of TEG MJR] who is taking on a vital role for us as head of European touring and middle east partnerships.

“We have a huge opportunity to grow our business and build on TEG’s enduring track record of touring success in concerts, sport, festivals, theatre, musicals, exhibitions, family entertainment, comedy, and e-sports, and Ticketek’s 40+ years’ experience ticketing major international events and partnering with the world’s premier venues.”

Formed last month, TEG Europe consolidates TEG’s UK-based operations into a single entity, comprising TEG Live Europe, TEG Venues, Propaganda, Ticketek and Ovation.

TEG Live Europe includes the former TEG MJR touring business, which has worked with artists including Snoop Dogg, Sia, Hans Zimmer, 50 Cent, Tom Jones, and Culture Club.

 


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Ticketmaster to acquire Thai Ticket Major

Ticketmaster has announced the part acquisition of Bangkok-headquartered Thai Ticket Major (TTM) as it enhances its presence in the Asian market.

Founded in 1999 by Tero Entertainment, TTM is the leading full-service ticketing company in Thailand and also has operations elsewhere within the region. Live Nation announced the acquisition of Tero’s concerts and entertainment division earlier this month.

Ticketmaster says that 90% of Western tours in Asia currently route through Bangkok, while Thailand also has a strong regional market for K-Pop and Japanese talent.

“Thailand’s live entertainment industry has seen immense growth over the past few years,” says Ticketmaster president Mark Yovich. “As we join with Thai Ticket Major, Ticketmaster will enhance the nation’s ticketing experience, bringing event organisers, venues and fans across the country an unrivalled level of service and experience.”

“Being part of Ticketmaster gives us the opportunity to elevate our ticketing solutions for Thailand’s premier venues and event creators”

Home to “several world-class venues and significant fan demand for live entertainment”, the Thai market is considered to be primed for the rapid adoption of digital ticketing, which Ticketmaster will deliver. Current TTM MD Komkrit Sirirat will continue to lead the local team and be responsible for all Thai operations.

“Delivering a market leading ticketing solution has been at the heart of TTM for the last 23 years, so it was the natural next step for us to join the world’s leading ticketing company, Ticketmaster,” adds TTM shareholder Brian Marcar, MD of Tero Entertainment. “Being part of Ticketmaster gives us the opportunity to elevate our ticketing solutions for Thailand’s premier venues and event creators as this market grows into one of the world’s premier live entertainment destinations.”

The announcement marks the latest phase in Ticketmaster’s Asian expansion following the establishment of Ticketmaster Taiwan and Singapore in 2020.

 


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The LGBTIQ+ List 2022: Alexandra Ampofo, Metropolis

The LGBTIQ+ List 2022 – IQ Magazine’s second annual celebration of queer professionals who make an immense impact in the international live music business – was published in the Pride edition (issue 112) this month.

The July 2022 issue, which is available to read now, was made possible thanks to support from Ticketmaster. 

To get to know this year’s queer pioneers a little better, we interviewed each individual on their challenges, triumphs, advice and more.

Throughout the next month, IQ will publish a new interview each day, starting with Alexandra Ampofo (she/her/hers), promoter at Live Nation-owned Metropolis in London, UK.

 


Tell us about a personal triumph in your career
Starting Women Connect was a personal triumph. I feel a sense of responsibility to give back, and the fact that I can tangibly do that with my resources is a win! With all the amazing women in my team and mentors who have donated their time along the way, we have been able to create a progressive community and safe space.

What advice could you give to young queer professionals?
Take your time and trust the process. No matter how others make you feel, there’s actually no rush and plenty of room for us all to exist in the same space.

What’s the best mistake you’ve ever made?
At uni I sent a document of cons about a workplace to a potential employer instead of a friend. I still ended up getting the job and consequently changing some of those things.

“The music industry needs to listen, learn and be open to feedback from the queer community or nothing will change”

Tell us about a professional challenge you’ve come across as a queer person in the industry
Homophobia and queer representation are still massive problems in our industry. I have seen and heard all of the passive-aggressive comments passed off as jokes. One of the hardest things to deal with is when a line has been crossed.

One thing the live industry could do to be a more inclusive place
The use of inclusive language needs to be at the forefront of everyone’s mind. The music industry needs to listen, learn and be open to feedback from the queer community or nothing will change.

A cause you support
Exist Loudly create spaces of joy and care for Black LGBTQ+ youth through creative innovation.

The queer act you’re itching to see live this year
Arlo Parks at Somerset House… I think Arlo is incredible, I’ve seen her perform a good few times and she never disappoints. I will be supporting her all the way!

Your favourite queer space
Any event the Rêveur Collective organise is always a good time. They are creating safe spaces for all LGBTQIA+ people, from mass bowling events to club nights and live podcast shows. They never miss the mark.

 


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LN-owned Secret Sounds buys Kicks Entertainment

Secret Sounds, the Live Nation-owned promoter behind Australian festivals Splendour in the Grass and Falls Festival, has acquired Kicks Entertainment.

Kicks is a premier Australian event management company which founded Foreshore Festival, Warehouse Festival and flagship festival Spilt Milk. The latter has sold out within minutes every year since its 2016 debut and has since expanded to three locations, Canberra, Ballarat and Gold Coast.

Financial terms of the deal between Secret Sounds and Kick Entertainment have not been disclosed.

“As festival and music fans ourselves, it’s exciting for us to have new partners that share our vision for event experiences that are fan-focused,” say Kicks Entertainment co-owners Jeff Drake and Ryan Sabet. “This partnership will evolve our conversations with artists and provide opportunities to activate venues and festivals that can house them. It will strengthen our ability to produce festival tours that deliver on our vision of ensuring quality over quantity.”

“[This] will strengthen our ability to produce festival tours that deliver on our vision of ensuring quality over quantity”

“Partnering with Secret Sounds and Live Nation is a natural step towards securing the future of new events and cementing those currently in the roster. The majority stake acquisition is also a boost for our loyal, local team. It brings new opportunities to enhance the already exceptional Kicks offerings and provides resources at an important time when fan experience is paramount.”

Secret Sounds co-CEOs Jessica Ducrou and Paul Piticco, add: “We’ve admired Jeff and Ryan’s work for a long time, they are brilliant entrepreneurs and the next generation of Australian promoters.

“We’ve been super impressed with the way they deliver their events and the consistent growth they’ve achieved with Spilt Milk, including the addition of a Gold Coast show which promptly sold out within days. We are very excited about this partnership and we’re looking forward to combining all of our skillsets and knowledge to support Spilt Milk’s further growth in the future.”

Secret Sounds is enjoying a bountiful return to live events, with a sold-out Splendour in the Grass (cap 50,000), the ‘biggest Falls line-up ever’ featuring Lil Nas X and Arctic Monkeys, and a slate of sold-out tours including Gorillaz, The Strokes and Jack Harlow.

Live Nation bought a majority stake in the New South Wales-based company in 2016, acquiring a 51% stake in Splendour and Falls, as well as its touring, sponsorship, PR, artist management and agency divisions.

 


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