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Prosecutions mount over Mirror video screen fall

The number of prosecutions brought over the incident in Hong Kong where a giant video screen fall on two dancers during a concert by boy band Mirror has risen to 15.

Two dancers were injured – one of them critically – in the incident at Hong Kong Coliseum on 28 July 2022. According to local media, Mo Lee Kai-yin, 27, remains in hospital six months on after sustaining injuries to his cervical vertebrae, head and lungs

Following an investigation, charges have been levelled against three companies – Engineering Impact, Hip Hing Loong Stage Engineering and Studiodanz.  The firms are accused of breaching the Occupational Safety and Health Ordinance and the Employees’ Compensation Ordinance.

Variety reports that the alleged offences included failure to provide employees with safe plant and safe systems of work, failure to notify the Commissioner for Labour of an accident and [failure] to take out employees’ compensation insurance for employees.

Three people were also charged with conspiracy to defraud in relation to the case earlier this month

The case is scheduled to be heard at the Kowloon City Magistrates’ Court on 27 March.

“The LD will not tolerate the above-mentioned illegal acts and will strictly enforce the law and do its utmost to protect the occupational safety and health as well as the statutory rights of employees,” says a Labour Department spokesperson.

Three people were also charged with conspiracy to defraud in relation to the case earlier this month. The trio – a woman and two men aged between 41 and 60 – are reportedly employees of Engineering Impact and will appear in court in February.

Police officers allegedly found some equipment was more than seven times the weight declared and claim the firm deliberately gave false information in order to obtain a permit for a planned 12-concert run by the 12-member boy band. The remaining shows were cancelled in the wake of the incident.

 


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Three charged over Hong Kong video screen fall

Three people have been charged in connection with an incident in Hong Kong where a giant video screen fall on two dancers during a concert by boy band Mirror.

One dancer was critically injured in the incident at Hong Kong Coliseum on 28 July 2022 and remains in hospital, according to local media.

The Hong Kong Free Press reports that a woman and two men aged between 41 and 60 will appear in court next month accused of conspiracy to defraud. The trio, who are reportedly employees of main contractor Engineering Impact Limited, were among five people arrested in a series of dawn raids last November. The other two people have been released “unconditionally”.

Police officers allegedly found some equipment was more than seven times the weight declared and claim the firm deliberately gave false information in order to obtain a permit for a planned 12-concert run by the 12-member boy band. The remaining shows were cancelled in the wake of the incident.

“We were of the view that they made false declaration deliberately, with the view to speed up the approval process for the show”

“The real weights of these mechanical devices were totally different from the data that was given by the company,” said Supt Alan Chung of the Kowloon West regional crime unit. “So we were of the view that they made false declaration deliberately, with the view to speed up the approval process for the show.”

In its official report, a government task force led by the leisure and cultural services department concluded a wire rope tied to the LED panel snapped due to “metal fatigue”.

It stated: “The causes include (1) inferior conditions of the rope, with the breaking strength of the wire rope being lower than the lowest breaking strength of a normal one; (2) the actual weight of the LED panel being much heavier than what was reported; (3) a problematic winch installation system making the rope guard difficult to rotate, causing damage to the rope surface and inducing extra load on the rope, leading to plastic deformation; and (4) poor workmanship on the assembly and installation of the LED panel suspension system.”

 


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Five arrested over Hong Kong concert tragedy

Five arrests have been made in connection with the horror incident that saw a giant video screen fall on two dancers during a concert by Cantopop boy band Mirror.

Mo Lee Kai-yin was critically injured in the incident at Hong Kong Coliseum on 28 July, while Chang Tsz-fung also required hospital treatment, with the release of an official report into the causes by the authorities thought to be imminent.

However, the South China Morning Post now reports that five suspects aged between 40 and 63 were arrested in a series of dawn raids after police officers found some equipment was up to seven times the weight declared.

According to police, eight sets of speakers on the stage weighed about seven times more than principal contractor Engineering Impact Limited’s reported weight of 1,600lbs, while six LED screens weighed a total of 9,852lbs – 63% more than was reported.

“There were lots of factors that caused the accident, and the numerous underreported weights could just be one of the causes”

“There were lots of factors that caused the accident, and the numerous underreported weights could just be one of the causes,” says Supt Alan Chung of the Kowloon West regional crime unit.

Chung has accused Engineering Impact of deliberately underreporting the weight of the stage equipment in an attempt to speed up the government approval process. He adds that the investigation also indicated that Engineering Impact and subcontractor Hip Hing Loong did not take measures to ensure the mechanical devices and cables met safety requirements.

Those arrested included staff members from both contractors, reveals a Post source.

The performance was part of a planned 12-concert run by the 12-member boy band, who formed in 2018. The remaining shows in the series were cancelled.

Mirror’s management MakerVille and show organiser Music Nation hired an independent third-party expert to look into the incident and have pledged to release further details after the results of the official investigation are released.

“We chose to hire teams considered top-notch in the industry, not cheaper, non-first-tier ones,” the companies said in a statement last month. “Cost was not our primary consideration.”

 


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Live Nation launches Hong Kong discovery platform

Live Nation is launching its global online artist discovery platform Ones To Watch in Hong Kong.

First launched in the US in 2017, the initiative has also run in Australia, New Zealand and China, and is designed to showcase emerging local talent with the support of Live Nation’s global network.

Ones To Watch introduces new artists to fans globally via exclusive interviews, playlists, live performances and other creative music content, and has helped progress the careers of Halsey, Dua Lipa, Lany and Yungblud, among others.

“The Ones To Watch programme plays an important role in Hong Kong by providing a platform that focuses on the professional development of homegrown acts”

“At Live Nation we are committed to supporting emerging local artists, bringing the best new talent to Hong Kong music fans,” says Live Nation Hong Kong MD Joanna Yuen. “The Ones To Watch programme plays an important role in Hong Kong by providing a platform that focuses on the professional development of homegrown acts, providing them with new audiences and launching them on to an international stage.”

Ones To Watch Hong Kong hosted its first live showcase event at the inaugural 852fes Awaken Festival at the AsiaWorld-Expo from 12-14 August. The collaboration stage featured emerging domestic acts, including Ng Lam Fung, Chanka, Lowa, Cath Wong, Jamie, Michael C and Lil’ Ashes.

Ones To Watch Hong Kong will continue to work with up-and-coming local talent to encourage career growth and fan connection.

 


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Safety clampdown in HK after video screen fall

Mid-air installations at concerts are to be banned temporarily in Hong Kong as officials investigate the horror accident that injured two dancers at a show by Cantopop group Mirror.

Mo Lee Kai-yin, 27, was critically injured when a giant video screen fell on him during the concert at Hong Kong Coliseum last week. A second dancer was also hospitalised but has since been discharged.

While the investigation remains ongoing, leisure and cultural services department taskforce has announced three interim rules for event organisers to comply with, reports the South China Morning Post.

The measures include a review of stage design and mechanical installations, while all mid-air mechanical devices “designed to swing, rotate or carry people” will be banned. Promoters must also appoint an authorised expert to review the safety of the installations daily.

A source tells the Post the taskforce’s aim is to review stage safety in Hong Kong and determine whether existing regulations need to be strengthened.

“We will look into whether the wire hit other cables or equipment when the TV screen it supported was rotating and moving up and down during the show”

Mirror’s performance was the fourth in a scheduled 12-concert run by the 12-member band, who formed in 2018. The remaining shows in the series have been cancelled, with refunds to be given to ticket-holders.

Mirror’s management MakerVille and show organiser Music Nation say they are working with authorities and the contractor and subcontractors behind the stage structures to establish what went wrong.

Hong Kong’s culture secretary Kevin Yeung said initial observations suggest the metal wire used to support the video screen had fractured, causing it to fall.

According to the Post, the subsequent investigation will focus on analysing the metal wire.

“We will… look into whether the wire hit other cables or equipment when the TV screen it supported was rotating and moving up and down during the show,” says an insider. “We also have to find out whether the wire has experienced metal fatigue.”

 


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Video screen falls on dancers at Hong Kong concert

A dancer for Cantopop boy band Mirror is in intensive care after a giant video screen fell on him during a concert in Hong Kong.

Mo Lee Kai-yin, 27, is in a critical condition with injuries to his cervical vertebrae, head and lungs following the incident at Hong Kong Coliseum last night (28 July), reports the South China Morning Post.

A second injured dancer, 29-year-old Chang Tsz-fung, was also taken to hospital but has since been discharged.

“From initial observation, a wire fractured and led to the fall of the screen and caused the dancers to be injured,” says Hong Kong’s culture secretary Kevin Yeung, as per CNN.

“We will embark on a very detailed investigation”

“We will embark on a very detailed investigation with support of relevant departments and some professionals to make sure we delve deep into the cause of the incident. It is our responsibility and determination to ensure a similar incident will not happen again.”

Mirror’s management MakerVille and show organiser Music Nation say they are working with authorities and the contractor and subcontractors behind the stage structures to establish what went wrong.

In a Facebook statement, MakerVille apologises for “unease to viewers or others affected” and confirm refunds will be given to ticket-holders.

The performance was part of a scheduled 12-concert run by the 12-member band, who formed in 2018. The remaining shows in the series have been cancelled.

 


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Asia-based execs predict “fruitless” start to 2022

Industry executives in Asia are sceptical about what’s in store for 2022, warning that the ‘groundhog day’ caused by enduring restrictions could long continue.

Speaking in the new issue of IQ, Michael Hosking of Midas Promotions – a leading promoter in South East Asia –  has predicted “another fruitless first three quarters in Asia”.

“But I’m hoping that we can have some shows in the final quarter of 2022… as long as we don’t get hit by the variant,” adds Hosking.

Justin Sweeting, co-founder of Hong Kong’s biggest music festival Clockenflap, shared a similar outlook on the year ahead.

“Stop. Start. Stop. Start. The stuttering groundhog day roundabout continues. I just hope we can get the proper opportunity to show that not only can events take place, in many senses, they’re actually the safest places to be in the city with testing and precautions in place,” he says.

Clockenflap Music and Arts Festival last took place in 2018, with the final pre-coronavirus edition (2019) cancelled at the last minute due to pro-democracy protests in the former British territory, which has been a special administrative region of communist China since 1997.

The 2020 and 2021 editions were both cancelled due to strict restrictions on large-scale outdoor events.

“I’m guessing it will be five or six years before attending two concerts a month will be back on the agenda for most people”

In the absence of the flagship festival, the Clockenflap Presents team organised a one-day festival, Long Time No See, last August in Mongkok.

Sweeting says that returning to live was his biggest highlight of 2021: “Seeing what live returns can look like in real life and that it is possible to hold events, both large and small, within a pandemic if the suitable precautions and steps are taken.”

He hastens to point out that one of the biggest challenges the market currently faces is navigating the patchwork of restrictions and requirements across the region.

“If an artist is up for spending quarantine time, there’s a captured market available! Otherwise, a challenge we face across Asia as a region is that different countries are opening up at different times and rates with different requirements,” he explains.

With that in mind, Hosking says it could take half a decade for the industry to return to 2019 levels of activity.

“I’m guessing that following the ‘dead cat bounce’ it will be five or six years before attending two concerts a month will be back on the agenda for most people – especially those who’ve not earned and saved on full salaries these past two years. I hope I’m WRONG!” he says.

“The pandemic is both dynamic and endemic and so isn’t going to just disappear any time,” adds Sweeting.

 


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Long Time No See: Clockenflap gets back to live

Clockenflap Presents, the concert series organised by Clockenflap, Hong Kong’s biggest annual music festival, has announced Long Time No See, a one-day festival featuring some of the brightest musical talent in Hong Kong.

Taking place on Saturday 18 September at the 1,800-seat MacPherson Stadium in Mongkok, the show will mix much-loved veteran acts with up-and-coming stars. Among those performing are YellowPeril (featuring LMF’s Mc Yan), breakthrough acts such as Anna Hisbbur and Charming Way, and a full-band set from singer-songwriter Cehryl.

Clockenflap Music and Arts Festival last took place in 2018, the final pre-coronavirus edition (2019) cancelled at the last minute due to pro-democracy protests in the former British territory, which has been a special administrative region of communist China since 1997. Its 2021 edition is scheduled for 26–28 November at the Central Harbourfront Event Space in Central, Hong Kong Island.

Tickets for Long Time No See are priced at HK$480 (€52) + booking fee.

 


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Hong Kong Coliseum created in Minecraft for C Allstar show

Earlier this year, Hong Kong digital entertainment company Kre8Lab launched The Show Must Go On, a new online concert concept designed and built inside online video game Minecraft.

Local boy band C Allstar played the first The Show Must Go On concert, dubbed Make it Happen, in August, and a second edition of the show will launch on Minecraft in late December. For the virtual venue, the Kre8Lab team designed and built a performance venue resembling the 12,500-seat Hong Kong Coliseum.

The August show coincided with the 10th anniversary of C Allstar’s debut, and transformed the band members into Minecraft avatars, while fans enjoyed the “full concert experience”, says Minecraft publisher Microsoft, including simulated ticket checks and temperature-tacking followed by finding a seat.

To familiarise new players with Minecraft games, the Kre8Lab spent three months in advance of the show crafting a ‘treasure hunt’ to recreate the streets of Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, including the Clock Tower, Star Ferry Pier, Hong Kong Cultural Centre, Hong Kong Space Museum, 1881 Heritage and more.

Meanwhile, brands were invited to set up virtual booths in advance of the show, with Deliveroo, McDonald’s and Reebook among the companies to take advantage.

 


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New socially distanced outdoor venue opens in HK

The Grounds, Hong Kong’s first socially distanced outdoor entertainment venue, has opened at AIA Vitality Park in the city’s Central district.

Located below the Hong Kong Observation Wheel on the Central Waterfront, The Grounds at AIA Vitality Park is the first venue in Hong Kong purpose built for the pandemic. It can seat up to 400 people in 100 private ‘pods’, each equipped with two to four deck chairs, with eventgoers able to order food and drink to their seats by scanning a QR code.

Each pod is sanitised, and visitors will have to comply with a range of anti-Covid-19 measures, including temperature checks, pre-registration and health declarations, and the wearing of face masks.

“The Grounds is designed to allow guests to play, socialise and be entertained responsibly”

Entertainment at The Grounds, which opened on 6 November, includes live music, film screenings, game shows, stand-up comedy and health and wellbeing events, says The Grounds MD Simon Wilson.

“We want to give Hong Kong something new to look forward to, while at the same time creating an opportunity for the local entertainment and hospitality industries to engage with audiences in an innovative, comfortable and safe environment,” he comments.

New events and tickets for events at The Grounds are released at midday local time every Wednesday.

“As we navigate this new global normal, The Grounds is designed to allow guests to play, socialise and be entertained responsibly,” adds Wilson.

 


This article forms part of IQ’s Covid-19 resource centre – a knowledge hub of essential guidance and updating resources for uncertain times.

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