x

The latest industry news to your inbox.


I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

Deezer strengthens support for French festivals

Streaming platform Deezer has pledged its “renewed and strengthened support” to French music festivals this summer under its “Live the Music” banner.

The Paris-headquartered company will continue to work with events such as We Love Green, Garorock, Eurockéennes, Vieilles Charrues, Rock en Seine, Rose Festival, Delta Festival and Golden Coast to curate “unique and immersive” festival experiences.

Promotions include the live version of its “Shaker” feature, which turns a collaborative playlist into a mini-festival with an exclusive dance floor and customised merch, and live music and party series Purple Door, where fans experience their favourite artists in an intimate and exclusive setting.

The streaming service also regularly brings its award-winning Giant Karaoke, after-parties and unique fan activations to events at Paris La Défense Arena, as well as organising exclusive concert series Deezer Sessions Live.

“We’re excited to be back this summer season to create even more unforgettable shared moments”

“Deezer is proud to support festivals in France,” says Deezer CMO Maria Garrido. “We strongly feel that festivals are social and cultural experiences in their own right, uniting fans through live music experiences and creating a sense of belonging.

“For years, we have been committed to offering festival-goers unique and immersive experiences, connecting them in new ways with their favourite artists and with other fans. We’re excited to be back this summer season to create even more unforgettable shared moments.”

The reinforced commitment comes after rival platform Spotify said last December that it was withdrawing its financial support from two French festivals in response to a new tax imposed on streaming services in the country. The so-called “streaming tax” was announced by president Emmanuel Macron’s government following “several months of consultation”, and will require subscription streaming platforms to make a contribution of 1.2% of their turnover in France.

The tax will directly finance France’s National Music Center (CNM), which was created in 2020 to support the wider music industry. Platforms that turnover less than €20 million a year will be exempt. However, Spotify said it would no longer support the Francofolies de La Rochelle and the Printemps de Bourges festivals as a result of the proposal.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

French fest says latest edition could be its last

Organisers of one of France’s biggest and longest-running music festivals say the 2024 edition could be its last, amid a dispute with local authorities.

The privately-funded 70,000-cap Les Vieilles Charrues festival in Carhaix, Brittany has been held since 1992, attracting the likes of Robbie Williams, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Blur, Muse, Lana Del Rey, Depeche Mode and Neil Young.

This year’s event, scheduled for 11-14 July, will star David Guetta, Kings of Leon, Sting, Sam Smith, Gossip, PJ Harvey, Yungblud and Simple Minds, among others. Regular four-day tickets cost €197.

But the Vieilles Charrues Association (VCA) is warning that “recent decisions by the municipality of Carhaix and the Poher community” have put the future of the festival at risk.

“If nothing changes between now and summer, the 2024 Les Vieilles Charrues could be the last,” say organisers.

According to Connexion France, the series of disagreements includes the sale of a building situated in the area used for the festival’s main entrance. Organisers had hoped to purchase the building but it was instead sold to a third party by the council last December, with the new owners set to move in this summer.

“Unfortunately, if nothing changes by this summer, the 2024 edition of Vieilles Charrues could well be the last”

Moreover, the VCA says it was hit with an “excessive and unfair” €367,000 bill from the council “without consultation” for use of the “meadow, buildings and the provision of municipal staff”.

It also alleges that Poher Council decided last month to “no longer make available half of the land occupied by the festival’s campsites from 2026″, and claims that officials are making decisions “without full knowledge of the facts”, and “constantly changing their mind”.

Stressing that the event brings in “over €2 million in donations”, as well as tourism, jobs, sponsorships and other benefits to the region, promoters are appealing “to the elected representatives of central Brittany to save the festival”.

“Faced with incessant reversals, we have the feeling that we are experiencing a relentless attack on our association,” says the association. “The accumulation of these decisions leads us to a dead end. We have had to constantly adapt in recent years. Today, we no longer have any room for manoeuvre or fallback around the festival.

“We are still, more than ever, viscerally attached to Carhaix and its inhabitants for almost 30 years and we cannot imagine the end of Vieilles Charrues. We are now calling on the elected representatives of central Breton to save the festival. Unfortunately, if nothing changes by this summer, the 2024 edition of Vieilles Charrues could well be the last.”

The local authorities are yet to respond to the claims.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

CTS Eventim wins race to acquire See Tickets

CTS Eventim is set to acquire See Tickets and a portfolio of festivals from the French-headquartered media group Vivendi.

The German live entertainment behemoth was among several parties to register interest in buying See Tickets, along with Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG).

However, CTS today announced it has signed a put option agreement on Vivendi’s festival and international ticketing activities, which form part of its Vivendi Village subsidiary.

The transaction is expected to be complete in the coming months and both See Tickets and the festival business will retain their existing identities and management.

While the price of the acquisition was not revealed, the Financial Times reported that Vivendi was seeking up to £300 million (€351m) for See Tickets, which the French firm bought for €96m in 2011.

The UK-headquartered ticketing company, which operates in nine countries worldwide, sold around 44 million tickets in 2023.

Also included in the CTS deal is Vivendi’s festival arm, which includes 11 events such as the UK’s Love Supreme and Kite, and Garorock in France.

The ticketing and festival activities that CTS Eventim is set to acquire from Vivendi collectively produced €137 million in revenues in 2023.

“CTS Eventim will be the right company to bring our ticketing and festival activities to new heights”

The ticketing business generated roughly €105 million of that, with the UK market responsible for the largest share, followed by its US market. The festival business that is part of the current deal generated an additional €32 million.

Vivendi’s performance hall activities, including L’Olympia in Paris, as well as See Tickets France and Brive Festival, are not part of the agreement.

“With See Tickets and its festival operations, Vivendi has established two notable players in the ticketing and live entertainment sector,” says Klaus-Peter Schulenberg, CEO, CTS Eventim.

“I’d like to thank Vivendi for the productive negotiations, which have created a strong foundation for success in an industry enjoying robust growth across Europe. The acquisition supports our internationalisation strategy and will also benefit artists and their managers, as we will be able to offer even more seamless services on a global scale. We look forward to collaborating with our new colleagues on shaping the future of live entertainment.”

Hala Bavière, CEO of Vivendi Village and member of the Executive Committee of Vivendi: “I am proud of what has been accomplished over more than a decade and extremely grateful for the strong dedication of all the teams involved. We at Vivendi are convinced that CTS Eventim will be the right company to bring our ticketing and festival activities to new heights, supporting See Tickets to remain a state-of-the-art company in services and technology, while fostering the growth of the festivals and preserving their unique identities and audience.”

CTS Eventim recently confirmed its 18th record year of revenue since its IPO in 2000. The pan-European ticketing and live entertainment giant’s annual revenue was up 22% in 2023, surpassing €2 billion for the first time to reach €2.359bn, while normalised EBITDA increased at 32% to reach €501.4 million.

Meanwhile, the firm’s share price has increased by 11.20% in the past five days, reaching an all-time high of €83.60 this morning.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

French association Prodiss rebrands following merger

French trade association Prodiss has rebranded following a merger with the National Union of Private Theatres (SNDTP) and the Union of Cabarets and Music Halls (CAMULC).

The association will now be called Ekhoscenes, marking its expansion to all stages including music, theatre, comedy and cabaret.

Its membership comprises 600 companies and tens of thousands of employees including show producers, concert hall operators, theatre and cabaret directors, broadcasters and festival organisers.

Ekhoscenes says its objectives are representing the scenes in all its diversity, relaying the expectations and challenges of entertainment entrepreneurs, and developing an ever more daring and inclusive culture.

Ekhoscenes’ membership now comprises 600 companies and tens of thousands of employees

“From 2024, Ekhoscenes will be fully mobilised to meet the many current challenges that live performance actors, in all their diversity, are facing: the sequence of the Olympic and Paralympic Games which will greatly disrupt the activities of the live performance sector,” reads a statement from Ekhoscenes.

It continues: “The structuring of the National Music Center by contributing to an overhaul of aid and support programs in line with the evolution of the ecosystem; the strengthening of the Association for the Support of Private Theater (ASTP); the question of artificial intelligence and the need for recognition of the rights of show producers and the challenge of ecological transition with the transformation of models.”

Created in 1984, Prodiss was the first national union representing private performing arts. Its members in the live music industry include Accor Arena in Paris, the Bataclan in Paris, Live Nation France Festivals, Live Nation SAS and Mama.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Paris opens new 8,000-capacity arena

Paris has opened its only purpose-built arena for this summer’s Olympic Games: Adidas Arena.

The 7,800-capacity venue in Porte de la Chapelle – which will eventually be used for concerts among other things – officially opened on Sunday (11 February) with a basketball match between Paris and Saint-Quentin.

Adidas Arena will host badminton and rhythmic gymnastic events during the Olympics, as well as para-badminton and para-powerlifting during the Paralympics.

During the Olympics, Adidas Arena will host badminton and rhythmic gymnastic events

Aside from the summer games, and as well as serving as the home of Paris Basketball, the arena will host other national and international sporting events, conferences and concerts.

The arena complex also features public facilities including an events hall and an 11.5-metre-high green terrace. The seats are made from recycled plastic and the arena will be powered by green energy.

German sportswear company Adidas acquired naming rights to the arena back in July 2022. The initial five-year contract with arena operating company SAE POPB is renewable for a further seven years.

The Paris Olympics will take place from 26 July to 11 August, with the Paralympics to follow from 28 August to 8 September.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Multiple bidders in running to acquire Garorock

Three potential buyers have emerged for France’s Garorock after the festival was put on the market.

The 50,000-cap event, which launched in Marmande in 1997, was acquired by French-headquartered media giant Vivendi five years ago through its Olympia Production subsidiary.

However, according to a report by Le Républicain, a new owner could be in place by the summer.

“We have received at least three very positive offers,” says a Vivendi spokesperson. “But no decision has been made. The various proposals are under study for several more weeks.”

Garorock 2024 will be held from 27-30 June, headlined by Calvin Harris, Sum 41, Swedish House Mafia and The Offspring. Acts such as Josman, Paul Kalkbrenner, PLK, Timmy Trumpet, Yungblud and Ayra Starr are also lined up to perform.

“To buy Vivendi Village, it can only be a player of this scale”

It was first revealed last September that Vivendi was exploring the sale of parts of its Vivendi Village subsidiary, including its entire festival division – also comprising brands such as Brive and ODP in France and the UK’s Love Supreme and Kite – along with its ticketing firm, See Tickets.

The company reportedly concluded the businesses were not of sufficient scale to compete with the likes of Live Nation and AEG.

AEG and fellow live entertainment giant CTS Eventim were rumoured to have entered the race to acquire See Tickets in late 2023. The Financial Times reported that Vivendi is seeking up to £300 million (€351m) for the company, which it bought for €96m in 2011, with AEG and CTS among the first round of indicative bids

“To buy Vivendi Village, it can only be a player of this scale,” says Garorock founder Ludovic Larbodie, as per Le Républicain.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Spotify pulls out of French festivals over tax row

Spotify has announced it is withdrawing its financial support from two French festivals in response to a new tax imposed on streaming services in the country.

The so-called “streaming tax”, which comes into effect in 2024, was announced by president Emmanuel Macron’s government following “several months of consultation”, and will require subscription streaming platforms to make a contribution of 1.2% of their turnover in France.

The tax will directly finance France’s National Music Center (CNM), which was created in 2020 to support the wider music industry. Platforms that turnover less than €20 million a year will be exempt.

As a result of the proposal, Spotify says it will no longer support the Francofolies de La Rochelle and the Printemps de Bourges festivals from next year onwards.

“Following the announcement of the implementation of a tax on music streaming in France, we regret to announce that Spotify France will stop supporting the Francofolies de la Rochelle and the Printemps de Bourges, from 2024, financially and through activations on the ground,” says Spotify France MD Antoine Monin on X.

The CNM is currently funded by a 3.5% levy on ticket sales for shows, a contribution from the state to cover operating costs, and support from rights management organisations.

Monin says the Swedish streaming giant, which campaigned for a voluntary contribution instead of the tax, will focus its attention on emerging artist initiatives the Chantier and the iNOUïs, adding: “Other announcements will follow in 2024.”

“France does not encourage innovation and investment”

The announcement of the streaming tax, which is intended to generate €15 million next year, was welcomed by groups including French live association Prodiss, whose director Malika Séguineau described it as “the only device which allows the CNM to be provided with sustainable and balanced financing”.

“We are delighted that the government has taken this decision, supported by deputies and senators,” added Séguineau. “After long months of consultation and discussions, we must now look to the future, with a fully operational CNM from 2024 serving the ambition for the music industry.”

However, the move was criticised in a joint statement by giants Apple, Deezer, Meta, Spotify, YouTube and TikTok, which claimed they had reached an agreement to raise a voluntary contribution of more than €14m in 2025.

A Spotify spokesperson slammed the proposed tax as an “inequitable, unjust and disproportionate measure”, with Monin warning the firm would “disinvest in France and will invest in other markets”.

“France does not encourage innovation and investment,” he told Franceinfo. “France will no longer be a priority for Spotify.”

France is the world’s sixth largest recorded music market according to the IFPI, generating €920m in recorded music revenue in 2022.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Prodiss backs French ‘streaming tax’ proposals

French live association Prodiss has welcomed the introduction of a new tax on music streaming services in France to support the wider sector.

The move, which comes into effect in 2024, has been announced by the government following “several months of consultation”. It will directly finance the National Music Center (CNM), which was created in 2020 to help the music industry’s various stakeholders, including labels, publishers, venues and promoters.

“The tax contribution of subscription streaming platforms and free content sharing platforms will be 1.2% of their turnover in France,” reads a press release from the Ministry of Culture. “Platforms with a turnover of less than €20 million will not be subject to this new contribution, which is expected to bring in €15 million in 2024.”

According to Tous Les Festivals, the CNM is currently funded by a 3.5% levy on ticket sales for shows, a contribution from the state to cover operating costs, and support from rights management organisations.

Prodiss director Malika Séguineau has backed the move, saying it is “the only device which allows the CNM to be provided with sustainable and balanced financing”.

“We are delighted that the government has taken this decision, supported by deputies and senators,” says Séguineau. “After long months of consultation and discussions, we must now look to the future, with a fully operational CNM from 2024 serving the ambition for the music industry.”

“France will no longer be a priority for Spotify”

However, the announcement has been criticised in a joint statement by giants Apple, Deezer, Meta, Spotify, YouTube and TikTok, which claim they have reached an agreement to raise a voluntary contribution of more than €14m in 2025.

According to the IFPI, France is the world’s sixth largest recorded music market, generating €920m in recorded music revenue in 2022.

“We take note of the government’s decision, which does not take into account the efforts made by many platforms including Spotify,” a Spotify spokesperson tells AFP, via Euronews. “This is a real blow to innovation, and to the growth prospects of recorded music in France. We are evaluating the follow-up to be given to the implementation of this inequitable, unjust and disproportionate measure.”

In addition, Spotify France CEO Antoine Monin describes the tax as “a monumental strategic error which goes against the issues of economic, cultural and European technology”, and warns the firm will “disinvest in France and will invest in other markets”.

“France does not encourage innovation and investment,” he tells Franceinfo. “France will no longer be a priority for Spotify.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Pushing the limits of sustainability

WE LOVE GREEN is a great example of what happens when a festival starts thinking about sustainability from the outset. As a self-proclaimed “laboratory for sustainable development solutions in the live entertainment and events industries,” everyone involved in the festival develops and tests eco-friendly solutions.

YOUROPE’s Katharina Weber talked to the festival’s head of sustainability Marianne Hocquard and head of engaged content Marie de La Giraudière to find out how WE LOVE GREEN successfully integrates all people involved with bringing the event to life, why it’s important to consider impacts beyond carbon emissions, and the advice they can give people who are new to sustainability.

How is WE LOVE GREEN’s ‘living laboratory’ approach incorporated into your everyday production life?
Marianne Hocquard: Sustainability is at the heart of our production. The sustainability work at WE LOVE GREEN is a collective effort, running through each department: management, production, partnerships, communication, artistic programming, and content management. It’s overseen by a dedicated team, which grows stronger every year. Starting with a sustainability coordinator at the festival’s creation in 2011, the sustainability department now has four people working year-round. This substantial payroll represents the festival’s primary expense related to sustainability and is the foremost indicator of its commitment. This is a significant specificity, particularly for a festival that is independent and associative.

What was the idea behind creating charters for all the different participant groups in your festival?
Marie de La Giraudière: Charters are essential: the production of the event involves a wide variety of stakeholders who are responsible for the setup, operation, and life of the festival. Organising and producing an event is a collective adventure. Since 2011, these charters have evolved to become more specific and suitable to the activities of each part of the festival. Today, there are charters for suppliers, artists, restaurants, volunteers, partners, and even festival-goers, who are required to sign their charter when buying tickets.

What’s in the charters?
MH: They contain the principles behind the festival’s policies, such as no single-use plastics, eco-certified products, waste sorting, water conservation, vegetarian catering, encouraging collaboration with local organisations, and so on. Beyond the charters, in 2023, we integrated binding sustainable development clauses directly into contracts: for example, clauses in artist contracts specifying maximum electrical power consumption in kWh per stage; and clauses in service provider contracts requiring them to complete the carbon assessment questionnaire to receive payment for their services after the festival.

How hard is it to get people to sign these requirements?
MH: Signing the charters happens quite naturally, primarily because our stakeholders are familiar with our festival and its commitments. Moreover, a charter remains a rather indicative document, without real contractual value, constraints, or obligations. However, the addition of contractual clauses led to more discussions; for example, the transition to 100% vegetarian artist catering, and the stipulations on maximum electrical power consumption or sound levels. But we are taking things gradually and provide comprehensive support, for example, by proposing production alternatives with less energy-intensive equipment and by developing vegetarian menus for restaurants with the creation of a specific recipe creation tool.

“Our carbon footprint has increased over the years due to the festival’s growth and the expansion of our calculation scope”

How has your carbon footprint developed over the years?
MH: Our carbon footprint has increased over the years due to the festival’s growth and the expansion of our calculation scope; for example, since 2022, we’ve been including festivalgoers’ accommodation in the calculation. A lack of complete data is also a critical factor because it leads to extrapolations, which can result in overestimations or underestimations of results. However, with comparable scopes in 2022 and 2023, the festival’s carbon footprint has decreased from 1,690 tonnes to approximately 800 tonnes CO2e, although the 2023 number isn’t final yet.

What led to this significant reduction?
MH: Primarily, it was about improved data collection. For example, in inputs, service providers’ freight, and artist travel, which limited extrapolations and overestimation, along with the shift to 100% vegetarian catering and a more domestic lineup attracting local audiences.

Why is it important to measure your carbon footprint?
MH: The carbon footprint is an accessible and proven monitoring tool for quantifying our carbon footprint, understanding it, and identifying areas for reduction. It allows us to evaluate the effectiveness of our actions by comparing results year-on-year. It’s a complex and time-consuming exercise as it requires collecting data from artists, suppliers, audience, and team, but this also means that it engages everyone in reducing their carbon impact. Still, it’s important to remember that a carbon footprint it is not comprehensive in assessing a festival’s total environmental impact. There is a need to complement it with other impact measurement tools.

One such complement would be the impact study on local biodiversity you did in 2022. What was the result?
MH: We conducted a preliminary small-scale study on our impact on biodiversity by targeting three bird species in collaboration with the League for the Protection of Birds. We found that the impact during the setup, which is related to the transport of materials, is just as significant as the impact during the event itself, which is related to sound and light peaks.

Are you planning any follow-up research to expand on this?
MH: Yes, we are planning an impact study that is unprecedented for an outdoor event and whose results we will turn into a practical guide for the industry. In partnership with the National Museum of Natural History, we will measure and objectively assess WE LOVE GREEN’s impact on the site’s wildlife and flora biodiversity and its surroundings over three years from autumn 2023. Protocols will be established to measure pressures and impacts on several animal and plant species, including counts, sound recordings, and GPS tracking. The project will also consider the positive impact of an outdoor event on reconnecting with nature.

“We collaborate with other European festivals to pool offers thereby creating a coherent tour routing while minimising distances between dates”

Do you have a no-fly policy or a no-private-jet policy for your acts?
MH: At the moment, it’s challenging for a festival of our size to mandate such requirements. However, we do a number of things to reduce artists’ travel footprint. We collaborate with other European festivals to pool offers thereby creating a coherent tour routing while minimising distances between dates. This year, we helped production teams to avoid air travel by proposing train alternatives, and we covered the costs of these journeys. Two artistic teams – a total of 20 people – chose the train over flying to or from the festival (one from Biarritz, the other to London). It’s a small victory that demonstrates that with guidance and explanation, we can achieve results and gradually change the habits of certain productions and artists.

How does your sustainability work affect your finances?
MdLG: We’ve calculated that sustainable energy, water, and dry-toilet choices in eco-responsible production cost the festival approximately 30% more than conventional providers and sometimes up to six times more for certain actions such as hosting committed associations and companies, supplying reusable tableware, diversifying the energy mix with solar panels and green hydrogen, having a year-round sustainability team, and so on.

Looking back at all the things you’ve tested over the years, what’s the craziest thing you’ve tried that still worked?
MdLG: The transition to 100% vegetarian this year, as the first major French festival to do so, was a challenge. We had to support the restaurants to offer a varied menu that might differ from their usual practices, and we also needed to ensure it was well-received by our diverse audience, artists, and teams. In the end, it went very well on both fronts, thanks to the dedication of our teams and the openness of festivalgoers to this topic. The operation was a success and will certainly be continued. This transition reduced the festival’s carbon food footprint by a factor of six compared to 2022, from 301 to 48 tonnes CO2e.

You also somehow manage to store the food of all 50 festival restaurants in only five refrigerated trucks…
MdGL: The logistics of that are definitely a challenge, but we have met it each year since 2017. This involves coordinating pickups from 50 different restaurants, managing the storage of their supplies while meeting operational requirements for speed, traceability, and security onsite. It’s a success that allows us to keep the impact of transportation and energy consumption in check in this aspect of production.

Was there anything you’ve tried that didn’t work at all?
MH: The adoption of compostable tableware for our public food court. These containers are meant to be composted or digested into methane. However, following an in-depth study involving the local authorities and several waste management providers, the festival’s teams realised that this wasn’t necessarily the case. The problem was that much so-called “compostable” tableware contains a layer of bioplastic (PLA) that degrades only over a very long time, hindering the compostability of the entire waste stream, so waste-processing platforms reject these containers. Also, most providers couldn’t handle the high volumes of waste produced at a large-scale festival. This is why we decided to supply reusable tableware instead.

“Don’t view sustainability as a constraint but as an opportunity to foster creativity and engagement for everyone”

Starting to work on sustainability can be hard because it’s such a huge field (if you’ll pardon the pun). What advice would you give festivals that don’t know where to start?
MH: 1. Start by making a ‘state of play’ of your festival, its practices, and note what could be considered an initiative related to sustainability. 2. Identify initiatives to enhance the festival’s sustainability and prioritise them. Keep in mind that you can’t do everything all at once; take a gradual approach by focusing on one or two areas and one or two actions each year. 3. Implement performance tracking and monitoring indicators for these actions. 4. Establish a dialogue process among the different festival teams to address sticking points and potential areas for improvement. 5. Above all, don’t view sustainability as a constraint but as an opportunity to foster creativity and engagement for everyone.

How can the small number of sustainability trailblazers in Europe help reach the large majority of festivals?
MdLG: By establishing methods, guidelines, and sharing acquired information and experiences, all while being supported by public authorities. This collaborative approach is at the forefront of sustainable festival development. At every opportunity, we share our experiences during conferences and professional events, both in France and internationally. Naturally, we respond to direct requests for information and guidance. Due to the increasing demand, we are currently developing specialised training modules for festivals and events looking to embark on the path of sustainability.

Would more regulations help or hinder sustainable development?
MdLG: We believe it is crucial for public authorities to take a proactive stance on this issue by implementing incentive mechanisms and even introducing eco-conditionality for financial support.

What’s WE LOVE GREEN’s next big target in sustainability?
MH: We already mentioned the biodiversity study, which will be the central focus of our eco-responsibility efforts for our next edition. In parallel, we will measure our festival’s impact on biodiversity at a global level. Just as we translate our impacts into CO2e emissions, we aim to provide translations in terms of biodiversity. For example, the shift to 100% vegetarian food has implications not only in terms of reducing CO2 emissions but also in preserving wildlife and flora, as well as preventing soil degradation. To date, these calculations do not exist in the event industry, and we aim to develop them.

This interview appears in the European Festival Report 2023, out this month.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Lyon’s LDLC Arena gets up and running

France’s biggest indoor arena outside of Paris is set to host up to 120 events per year, including concerts, after opening last month.

The Populous-designed LDLC Arena in Lyon, which has an adjustable capacity ranging from 6,000 to 16,000, opened to the public on the 23 November with a Euroleague basketball game between LDLC ASVEL and FC Bayern Munich.

It has gigs lined up by artists including Sting, Eric Clapton, Calogero, Jonas Brothers, Grand Corps Malade, Slimane and Green Day. Populous previously designed Lyon’s 60,000-cap Groupama Stadium, home of football club Olympique Lyonnais.

“We’re excited to deliver our second venue for Lyon alongside Olympique Lyonnais Groupe,” says Francois Clement, senior principal and leader of Populous’ business operations in France. “Leading on the arena and interior design with our interiors practice, Jump Studios, Populous was able to extend the Groupe’s ambitious OL Valley venture by providing a venue that responds to the local community.”

Lyon – the second largest metropolitan area in France, and the focal point of the south-eastern region of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes – has long had a claim to be France’s second most important market.

“Set to attract some of the best talent in live entertainment, LDLC Arena will become a cultural hub and a significant asset to the city.” adds Clement.

“Arenas are attracting more and more attention when it comes to sustainability”

Sustainability has been “at the heart” of the design process according to Populous, which optimised the layout of the internal spaces to minimise the footprint of the building, thus reducing the volume of building materials needed. The shell of the venue comprises an innovative double skin, which helps regulate the temperature within the arena and minimise the need for climate control systems.

The arena generates its energy with 5,500 sqm of photovoltaic panels on the main roof. In the public area surrounding the venue, 30% of the total area will be green space, with the scheme to include hundreds of mature trees and a large bird reservation to the north of the site.

“Arenas are attracting more and more attention when it comes to sustainability,” adds Elizabeth Miglierina, LDLC project lead at Populous. “Designing LDLC Arena, a large-scale, ambitious building in one of the biggest French cities, demonstrates Populous’ commitment to delivering best-in-class venues with a reduced impact on our environment. As designers, we are sharing our vision of creating spaces for people and the planet.”

Olympique Lyonnais Groupe (OL Groupe) signed a deal with Live Nation in 2021 to develop the Lyon arena, extending the pact that began in 2016 with the opening of the Groupama Stadium. The partnership has brought artists such as Rihanna, Coldplay and Ed Sheeran to the stadium.

Elsewhere, Live Nation France has announced that DJ Snake has sold out his headline concert at the 80,000-cap Stade de France in Saint-Denis in a matter of minutes. The Paris-born DJ and music producer, who previously sold out the 60,000-cap Parc des Princes in the French capital in 2022, will perform at the stadium on 10 May 2025.

Click here to read IQ‘s recent City Focus on Lyon.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.