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IFF ’22: ‘Agents and promoters must stick together’

Top agents and festival promoters say that the spirit of collaboration cultivated during the Covid-19 pandemic must be maintained if the industry is to overcome the next set of challenges.

The discussion took place today at IFF (International Festival Forum) during the panel Festivals & Agents: Happier than ever?, which featured Nikolaj Thorenfeldt (Smash! Bang! Pow!, DK), Chris Payne (WME, UK), Adele Slater (Wasserman Music, UK), Rauha Kyyrö (Fullsteam Agency, FI) and Cindy Castillo (Mad Cool, ES).

Fullsteam’s Kyyrö told IFF delegates that the bright side of the pandemic was an increased sense of understanding and patience among colleagues in the business.

“What I’ve noticed during the summer and autumn is that none of the companies to me seem to be working 100% efficiently,” she said. “I think everyone’s still struggling a little bit with how to set up their business and how to work internally so this is making us a little bit more patient. I’m no longer getting so many angry emails about not responding right away. I might get a reminder, but it’s usually a kinder reminder.”

Wasserman Music’s Slater said the pandemic also gave promoters and agents the chance to get to know the person behind the email address, thus humanising business relationships.

“We all had to club together because no one really knew what was going on at any point,” she said. “With promoters, once you’d rescheduled your shows, you would check in on them and see if they were okay and actually get to know the person rather than asking for a pencil. You had time to get to know people. It helped relationships with people rather than [feed into] the whole agent versus promoter [thing].”

Thorenfeldt from Smash! Bang! Pow! agreed, adding: “Some of the best conversations I’ve had with various business partners was when we actually got to talk about stuff that’s not numbers of whatever. You actually started to get to know certain relationships a lot better, which I think has been incredibly fruitful in a lot of ways since we returned to business. You found out what’s important in some of your work relationships and got a better idea of what sort of pressure each of us is feeling in our everyday life.”

Mad Cool’s Castillo said she personally experienced this newfound empathy from industry peers when the promoter cancelled Mad Cool Sunset.

“I think we have become more willing to look for solutions when problems arise”

The festival was called off after organisers were unable to find a “suitable” replacement for Rage Against The Machine, who recently cancelled all forthcoming dates in the UK and Europe.

“Four or five years ago, the response probably would have been ‘You’re gonna pay me everything now’,” explained Castillo. “Now, 95% of people said ‘Okay, Cindy, don’t worry. We understand the situation. It’s a shame this has happened. Let’s look for a solution.

“I think we have become more willing to look for solutions when problems arise. Maybe a couple of years ago, there would have been more aggressive communication with people demanding what they want but now there’s understanding.”

And it’s not just the bonds between agents and promoters that have strengthened because of the pandemic, according to WME’s Payne.

“We’ve got closer as a team internally because we’ve had to help each other. It might be that one of my colleagues has got a show but I’ve got a better relationship with a promoter and I’ll go down and help a little bit. And hopefully, that’s happening in the promoter world as well. It makes you just run harder and faster and better together.”

The panel agreed that, going forward, different forces in the industry must continue to work as one in order to overcome issues such as soaring costs, staff shortages and talent drains.

“These are crazy circumstances and we need to try and compromise,” continued Payne. “So I’m hoping compromises are a bigger part of everyone’s conversations, from agents to promoters, because we’re in an ecosystem and you don’t have one without the other.”

Thorenfeldt from Smash! Bang! Pow! added: “We want to help great artists achieve their wildest dreams – that’s the mutual goal for all of us. I also think that if there’s a mutual problem we need to look at it together, as well.”

 


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IFF 2022: Unpacking the European festival season

A handful of top festival executives reflected on a tough summer and highlighted the key challenges ahead in the opening panel of the 2022 International Festival Forum (IFF).

A record 800 delegates from 45 countries have flocked to the eighth edition of the invitation-only event for festival professionals and booking agents, which kicked off last night (27 September).

Today’s The Festival Season 2022 panel brought together promoters Karolina Kozlowska (Live Nation, SE), Detlef Kornett (DEAG, DE) and Nadja Konietzko (Bluesfest Byron Bay, AU), with agents James Wright (UTA, UK) and Sally Dunstone (Primary Talent International, UK).

Kornett detailed a number of the now-familiar issues experienced by events across the board coming out of the pandemic.

“We’ve been all been hit with price increases, with logistical problems, with lack of security, lack of stagehands, lack of riggers, lack of material,” said Kornett. “But I found this year particularly challenging, hearing and experiencing all the stories of our long term suppliers being in the dark.

“For some of the festivals, the price increases and whatsoever could not be captured because we’d already sold the tickets [in 2020]. So our results have not been as we wanted them to be, but generally we felt lucky because we could stage our events. We were not hit by weather, we didn’t have to shut down because we couldn’t get security. Our long term suppliers across the group worked with us. So we somehow got there but how, at times, you can only talk about at night when nobody’s listening.”

“We sold 15% of our tickets in the last two weeks, which showed the audience was also traumatised by what happened”

Konietzko explained how Bluesfest managed to ultimately triumph over adversity.

“Our season started with the cancellation of the 2021 event, which was one day before the event,” she lamented. “We were faced with the biggest challenge for our company, which is 33 years old. So we had to go into the politics and convince government to bail us out and to help us, which they did because they were the ones who shut us down because of one case of Covid in the area. So it was very political this year.

“Our challenges were to not only find finances for the year ahead, but to also pay out every supplier and staff member who was already working on the 2021 event. And we succeeded – not only did the government help with the payment of the 2021 event, we were able to get some grants and funding for the future event.”

A further complication arose when the Byron Bay festival site was hit by flash floods in the weeks leading up to the 2022 festival in April, headlined by Crowded House and Midnight Oil.

“Our crew had been through so much already for two years and the wish to return was bigger than anything else,” added Konietzko. “So I don’t know how we did it, but we managed and we opened. We sold 15% of our tickets in the last two weeks, which showed the audience was also traumatised by what happened.”

“Some people are very willing to buy the more expensive ticket to get that extra comfortable experience”

Kozlowska recalled her unfortunate timing of starting with Live Nation Sweden in March 2020.

“I started booking a festival and that cancelled very shortly afterwards, followed by the next one. So my first festival summer in Sweden was very interesting,” she said. “There were some challenges but, overall, Lollapalooza went amazingly: we had over 70,000 unique visitors – an increase of 20% from 2019.”

The promoter said there had been a huge increase in VIP and platinum ticket sales, which could theoretically help subsidise cheaper tickets in the future.

“Some people are very willing to buy the more expensive ticket to get that extra comfortable experience,” said Kozlowska. “So you might not need to raise all your ticket prices – at least not by 20% – if you can make better experiences for the VIP or platinum guests and then by that, you can also get the young kids to actually be able to afford a ticket.”

Primary Talent’s Dunstone, who works with acts such as Jack Harlow and Rina Sawayama, was also able to put a positive slant on the season.

“People are going to have to choose whether they want to go on vacation or whether they want to do a festival as a holiday”

“It’s been a great summer for my clients,” she said. “Everybody’s been out touring. A lot of my clients blew up during lockdown so it’s the first time they’ve been able to actually play festivals, so from that perspective, it’s been really positive. But there have been a lot of challenges, especially with the state of the airports within Europe: lost luggage, cancelled flights, people missing connections. That’s definitely been a lot of my problem-solving over the summer. But the shows all happened.

“There are going to be a lot of challenges next year, especially with price rises across the board. People have to be more careful with how they spend their money. When buying a festival ticket, you have to buy everything around it – transport, accommodation, so it can become like a holiday really. So people are going to have to choose whether they want to go on vacation or whether they want to do a festival as a holiday.”

Kornett brought up the findings of a survey which suggested that up to half of German festival-goers in Germany were put off returning to festivals due to Covid-19.

“In the UK, obviously, Covid is kind of over and one’s stopped worrying for now about that,” he said. “On the continent, it’s slightly different, and in Germany in particular. In Germany, there was a survey that was quite interesting because, across all festival goers, 50% were concerned about Covid when going to a festival, and thought that would possibly keep them from going. That’s a large number.

“The other question is even more interesting: what would make you go back? And the answer was, ‘If it was cheaper.’ Well, that goes against what we’re about to face where everything is going to go up.”

“Next year is going to be about ‘be unique or be cheap’, but anything in the middle will be really difficult to get through”

The prospect of further consolidation in the festival market also cropped up, with Wright deeming it “inevitable”.

“I don’t necessarily think it’s a good or bad thing,” he said. “There’s definitely and always will be a market for independent festivals in the same way that grassroots venues and independent venues are a vital part of our business. But I think consolidation, in the same way it is with the agency businesses, is inevitable to some degree.”

“Consolidation is part of our business,” added Kornett. “You also need to watch carefully for consolidation in stage hands/crew-type of businesses. Because I think there will be quite a few companies that need to seek support in order to get through what they experienced this year.

“Recession is going to hit us and I think we will see people that left our industry return because logistics and retail and construction, all of them will suffer. Starting a new festival will be a big challenge. I like to say that next year is going to be about ‘be unique or be cheap’, but anything in the middle will be really difficult to get through.”


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Australian fest cancelled after Festicket collapse

An Australian music festival has been cancelled following the collapse of festival discovery and booking platform Festicket.

Presented by Triple M, the 10,000-cap Borderline Music and Arts Festival was due to be held at Gateway Lakes, Wodonga, Victoria, on 8 October, headlined by acts such as Jimmy Barnes, The Teskey Brothers, Pete Murray, Glenn Shorrock, Tulliah and Nikki Nicholls.

Organisers have released a statement attributing the cancellation to “unforeseen circumstances outside of our control”.

“This tough decision was necessary due to our primary ticketing partner Festicket entering into administration”

“This tough decision was necessary due to our primary ticketing partner Festicket entering into administration, which has caused significant and unrecoverable financial issues for the event organisers,” reads the statement. “Labour shortages, supply chain issues and difficult economic conditions including ballooning insurance premiums and infrastructure costs have also created problems.

“Proceeding with the event in the face of all these difficulties would have meant that the audience experience would have suffered and that was simply not an option. We worked hard to try and deliver a great event for the border community of Albury-Wodonga but we have exhausted all options to avoid cancellation and for that we sincerely apologise.”

London-headquartered Festicket, which acquired Event Genius and the associated Ticket Arena consumer website and brand in 2019, formally entered administration last week, with ReSolve Advisory Limited appointed to oversee the process.

The firm previously filed a moratorium, which ended on 30 August as it was “no longer likely to result in the rescue of the company as a going concern”. Its most recently available accounts from July 2021 showed losses of €8,976,888 for 2020 and €12,934,107 for 2019.

According to Mixmag, Festticket clients are said to include TimeWarp, Ibiza’s Amnesia and Cova Santa, Secret Project Amsterdam, ION Festival and Epizode in Albania, Primavera Sound Los Angeles, Morocco’s MOGA, Fort Festival in Spain, and Gilles Peterson’s Worldwide in France.

Bristol’s Motion Club, which has partnered with Festicket and Ticket Arena for the last six years, says it is owed in excess of £300,000

Earlier this month it was reported that ticketing exchange and technology firm Lyte had reached a deal to acquire certain assets from Event Genius.

Elsewhere, in the UK, Bristol’s Motion Club, which has partnered with Festicket and Ticket Arena for the last six years, says it is owed in excess of £300,000 due to not receiving payments for tickets sold through their platforms, and is calling on HMRC to immediately pause any deals that see assets sold from Festicket.

Meanwhile, North Brewing Co, which holds beer festival The Springwell Sessions, tells The Drinks Business it lost in excess of £25,000 as a result of Event Genius’ collapse. A GoFundMe page set up to protect ticket holders and ensure the event could still go ahead raised more than £15,000.

Festicket has offices in the US, the Netherlands, Germany, Portugal, France and Australia.

 


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Live Nation Spain’s Cesar Andion plots AMF sequel

Live Nation Spain’s Cesar Andion tells IQ he hopes to establish the Andalucía Music Forum as an annual event following its successful launch earlier this month.

The newest gathering for the international music industry in southern Europe debuted at the Albeniz Cinema in Málaga from 5-7 September, attracting 350 delegates and speakers.

Showcases were limited to acts from guest country Mexico, alongside local Andalucían talent.

“We are all super-happy with how everything turned out – it was exactly what I had in my mind when I was designing it,” says Andion. “The attendance was perfect for deep and friendly networking, as we wanted AMF to be a forum and not a big conference fair.

“The vibe was friendly, professional, easy-going, laid back and fun, and Málaga was the perfect spot as a gateway for Latin America in Europe and vice-versa. It’s very different to most of music conferences and we want to keep it that way in terms of the concept, vibe and style.”

“We are also planning another one in Madrid that will be completely different to AMF”

Andion says the biggest organisational challenges concerned the timing.

“We organised it all in just a few months and during the summer, which is quite a hard time to work because everyone is either on holidays or working on festivals,” he says. “But we have a great team with pros in Europe like Ruud Berends (Netherlands) and Ignacia Snadoval (Germany), Fabrizio Onetto and Malfi Dorantes from Mexico, and of course Esteban Ruiz and Erica Romero in Andalucía. The Mad Cool team worked really hard to make it happen and I am very thankful to everyone.”

And not only does Andion now have a sequel in the works, he also has his sights set on launching a sister conference in Madrid.

“We are also planning another one in Madrid that will be completely different to AMF,” he reveals.

AMF is part of the Andalucía Big by Mad Cool project, which also included the new 30,000-cap Andalucía Big Festival, held near Sacaba Beach from 8–10 September, with acts such as Muse, Jamiroquai, Years & Years, Glass Animals, Michael Kiwanuka, Wolf Alice, Franz Ferdinand and Aurora.

“It’s a very ambitious project and has been a total success”

“The project is ‘big’, as it is titled, because it has three ‘legs’ as we say in Spanish: the pro forum, the festival and a tour of Andalucían provinces,” explains Andion. “It’s a very ambitious project and has been a total success. Málaga deserved a big festival as it’s one of the coolest and most visited cities in Spain, but also because it’s the cultural and event capital of Andalucía.

“The festival had incredible vibe, I was really impressed with the audience, which was Spanish in majority but with great attendance of Brits.”

Mad Cool Festival and The Spanish Wave are also teaming up to promote Spanish talent at next week’s International Festival Forum (IFF), ILMC’s invitation-only event for music festivals and booking agents. The event will mark the culmination of a nationwide project to find the best emerging acts from Spain.

Three Spanish artists – Hickeys, Irenegarry and Pablo Drexler – were chosen from more than 500 applications and will perform at the Mad Cool Festival & The Spanish Wave Presents showcase at London’s Camden Assembly from 9pm on Wednesday (28 September).

Spain is the guest country for IFF 2022, which takes place in London between 27-29 September.

 


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Elena Barreras named head of Primavera Pro

Elena Barreras has been installed as the new head of music industry conference Primavera Pro.

Primavera Pro 2023 will be held at the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona (CCCB) and the Parc del Fòrum from 31 May to 4 June.

Barreras, who has more than 20 years of music industry experience – 12 of them with Primavera, succeeds longtime colleague Almudena Heredero in the director role.

“I am very happy to take over the management of this project, which is so special and different in its kind,” says Barreras. “Primavera Pro is not just a professional meeting, it is something that goes beyond that. It is a space which is in constant motion, that is diverse and where we can continue to discover the future of music. It is a global and enriching experience and I am very proud to be able to continue to see it grow and to grow with it.”

“Apart from making Primavera Pro expand, we want to try out new formats and open up to other themes and sectors”

New monthly activities are being prepared from October onwards to expand Primavera Pro to a year-round brand.

“Apart from making Primavera Pro expand, we want to try out new formats and open up to other themes and sectors,” adds Barreras. “The idea is to make the project more cross-sectional and to continue collaborating with the local fabric. To explain everything that will change and mark the professional relations of future generations.”

Heredero, meanwhile, was recently named as the new director of Primavera Sound Madrid. The Madrid leg debuts at the City of Rock in Arganda del Rey from 8-10 June 2023, a week after its flagship Barcelona edition (1-3 June).

“There are challenges that can only be taken on with pride and enthusiasm,” says Heredero. “The fact that Madrid is going to host its first edition of Primavera Sound is one of them. On the one hand, it is an important but natural step, after years of tours organised by Primavera Sound as a promoter and events like Primavera Club that have already linked the two cities.

“On the other hand, from a professional point of view and as vice-president of the Association of Women in the Music Industry (MIM) since 2019, I can only be happy to accept the challenge of directing a music festival that demands as much responsibility and professionalism as Primavera Sound.”

“We are thrilled by the response and the welcome that Los Angeles and its public have given us”

Primavera held its maiden US edition in Los Angeles last weekend, welcoming 50,000 attendees from 50 countries to the State Historic Park from 16-18 September. Artists included Arctic Monkeys, Lorde and Nine Inch Nails.

“We are thrilled by the response and the welcome that Los Angeles and its public have given us,” says Primavera Sound director Alfonso Lanza. “It has been a challenge, but also an honour, to have transferred the philosophy and the differential factor of a festival created in Barcelona two decades ago to one of the nuclei of the music industry.

“This is one of our main objectives: that the model and concept of Primavera Sound be understood and enjoyed in any part of the world where it is held.”

Primavera’s 20th anniversary celebrations continue with events in São Paulo, Brazil from 31 October to 6 November, Santiago in Chile (7-13 November) and Buenos Aires, Argentina (7-13 November), and the Primavera Weekender in Benidorm, Spain (18-19 November).

 


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Live Nation acquires majority stake in Goodlive

Live Nation GSA (Germany Switzerland Austria) has acquired a majority stake in Berlin-headquartered festival, booking and services agency Goodlive.

The stake, which IQ believes to be 51%, was acquired from former shareholders Paragon Partners and Goodlive’s founders.

In the wake of the deal, Goodlive will continue to focus on its brands, which include Melt, Splash!, Full Force, Heroes Festival and Superbloom Festival, while working with the Live Nation teams to develop new festival and live experiences.

“We are happy that Goodlive GmbH and its management team Marko Hegner and Mirko Roßner have decided to become part of the Live Nation family,” says Live Nation GSA MD Andre Lieberberg. “The strength of the Goodlive GmbH organisation and its staff, as well as the undisputed relevance of its projects, perfectly complement Live Nation GSA’s portfolio. I look forward to the upcoming collaboration with Goodlive and am very confident that we will realise new and exciting projects together.”

“We have already worked together successfully in the past at festivals such as Lollapalooza Berlin and are delighted to now be able to expand this cooperation on all levels”

The inaugural edition of Superbloom, spearheaded by festival MD Fruzsina Szép, launched in Munich’s Olympic Park earlier this month after two postponements due to Covid-related restrictions.

“We are so pleased to have Live Nation as our future partner,” adds Goodlive MD Mirko Roßner. “Through their international network they are an ideal fit for Goodlive. We have already worked together successfully in the past at festivals such as Lollapalooza Berlin and are delighted to now be able to expand this cooperation on all levels. It is with great anticipation that we are looking forward to the future and our joint projects.”

Goodlive announced the expansion of its partnership with ticketing and discovery platform Dice last week.

 


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Riot erupts after Lil Baby cancels headline set

A riot erupted at a hip-hop festival in Canada after rapper Lil Baby abruptly cancelled his headline performance due to illness.

The US artist had been due to close the two-day Breakout Festival at Vancouver’s 7,000-cap PNE Amphitheatre on 18 August, but pulled his set at the 11th hour, with organisers tweeting he was “too sick to perform”.

According to police, the announcement sparked fights among concert-goers inside and outside the venue, with seven people arrested for breach of the peace and “likely thousands of dollars” caused in property damage.

“Vancouver Police officers were already inside the venue and providing extra security when several hundred people began fighting and destroying property in the Amphitheatre, on the PNE grounds, and in the surrounding neighbourhood,” says constable Tania Visintin. “Dozens of extra officers were redeployed from other areas of the city to restore order, with some officers having bottles and other objects thrown at them.”

A criminal investigation into the disorder has now been launched.

“We will pursue criminal charges against people who participated in this violence and destruction”

“We will conduct a full and thorough investigation into the actions of anyone who destroyed property, put concert-goers in danger, or committed other criminal acts,” adds Visintin. “Though this investigation will take time, we will pursue criminal charges against people who participated in this violence and destruction.”

Artists including Polo G, Quavo & Takeoff and Saturday night headliner Trippie Red had performed at the event over the weekend. Breakout Festival had previously taken place in 2018 and 2019.

“Last night’s end to the 2022 Breakout Festival resulted in the worst case scenario of disappointment due to Sunday’s final performer cancelling and we want to apologise to everyone who peacefully left the venue, as well as the venue staff and the Hastings-Sunrise neighbourhood for the way Breakout 2022 ended,” says a statement from organisers.

“We do not condone violence or destruction of property and are utterly disappointed with the way some of our patrons acted at this year’s event. Safety of our guests and venue staff is our number one concern. We did everything to make Breakout a unique and enjoyable experience for Vancouver’s rap fans.

“We want our audience to know we did everything in our power to make every festival a success and we want to thank every loyal fan and all of the staff who attended the events over the years. Stay tuned for information and details regarding partial refunds for two-day and Sunday Breakout 2022 ticket-holders.”

 


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Roskilde Festival revamps booking team

Roskilde Festival has announced a revamp of its booking team and an increased focus on volunteering in the wake of its recent 50th anniversary edition.

Anders Wahrén, who has been a booker of Denmark’s biggest festival since 2003 and programme director since 2014, will retain overall responsibility for music, art and activism, but will no longer book the event going forward and is succeeded by new head of booking Thomas Jepsen

“It is absolutely essential that we continue to push the limits and develop Roskilde Festival in new directions,” says Wahren. “That is why we are now changing how we put together our music programme. Partly in the distribution of roles in the booking team, but we are also in the process of rethinking how we can involve volunteers even more in programming in the future.”

Jepsen has been associated with the booking team since 2009 – the first years as a volunteer and from 2014 as a booker.

“I would like to build on the work we are already doing, where our focus is especially on young people’s communities,” says Jepsen. “We want to continue to pique people’s curiosity and give them something more than what they necessarily have on their wish list.

“At the same time, we must ensure diversity in the music programme. In recent years, there has been a necessary, increased focus on the gender distribution on the festival line-ups, we will also in the future pay even more attention to the representation of minorities in our programming.”

“We have a goal of reaching all corners of the musical trends, and the risk of hitting blind spots is minimised if we expand the group”

With Roskilde’s foundations based on voluntary engagement, the new organisation is focusing on involving even more volunteers in the booking team and on developing new ways in which they can engage.

“We have a goal of reaching all corners of the musical trends, and the risk of hitting blind spots is minimised if we expand the group,” adds Wahren. “Therefore, we are now investigating other ways to volunteer. It could, for example, be as a scout, where you go to concerts and report back to us. It could also be on a more organisational level. We are developing that.”

Wahren will be joined by deputy director – communications, partnerships & philanthropy Christina Bilde and head of sustainability Sanne Stephansen at this year’s International Festival Forum in London for the keynote conversation Roskilde Festival: 50 Years Young from noon on Wednesday 28 September.

The festival will then host a special 50th birthday celebration in the Glasshouse of IFF’s host hotel, the Holiday Inn in Camden from 9-11pm later that day.

Click here to read IQ‘s feature commemorating Roskilde’s half-century.

 


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Speaker line-up completed for IFF 2022

The full list of speakers has now been confirmed for the 2022 International Festival Forum (IFF), presented in association with TicketSwap.

More than 700 booking agents and festivals have signed up from 40-plus markets for the invitation-only event in London from 27-29 September.

Live Nation promoter Karolina Kozlowska (SE) and UTA’s James Wright (UK) complete the lineup for The Festival Season 2022 panel, joining Detlef Kornett (DEAG, DE), Nadja Konietzko (Bluesfest Byron Bay, AU) and Sally Dunstone (Primary Talent International, UK) from 10.30am on Wednesday 28 September.

The Roskilde Festival team – programme director Anders Wahren, deputy director – communications, partnerships & philanthropy Christina Bilde and head of sustainability Sanne Stephansen – will then star in the keynote conversation Roskilde Festival: 50 Years Young at noon.

The legendary Danish festival will host a special 50th birthday celebration from 9-11pm later that day in the Glasshouse of IFF’s host hotel, the Holiday Inn in Camden (more details here).

In addition, Runway Artists founder Matt Hanner (UK) will join Superbloom’s Barbara Hexges (DE), Jess Kinn & Sean Goulding (One Fiinix Live, UK), Mother Artists’ Natasha Gregory (UK) and Stephan Thanscheidt (FKP Scorpio/Tempelhof Festival, DE), to present their new companies or events on our New Kids on the Block session, on Thursday 29 September from 10.30-11.30am.

Finally, Mad Cool Festival’s Cindy Castillo (ES) completes the Festivals & Agents: Happier than ever? session, alongside Wasserman Music’s Adele Slater (UK), Chris Payne (WME, UK), Smash!Bang!Pow!’s Nikolaj Thorenfeldt (DK) and Rauha Kyyrö from Fullsteam (FI), at noon on Thursday 29 September.

Supporters of this year’s IFF include Ticketmaster, Tysers, Vatom, eps, Ooosh! Tours, Music Venue Trust, John Henry’s and the UK’s Department for International Trade.

View the full artists’ lineup here, and listen to all the showcasing artists via the official IFF 2022 playlist here. For more information on the IFF’s 2022 schedule, click here.

 


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Dice expands partnership with Germany’s Goodlive

Ticketing and discovery platform Dice has expanded its partnership with Germany’s Goodlive Artists.

Dice formally launched in the German market in May, teaming with Goodlive Artists to deliver sold-out shows with the likes of Fred Again, Marc Rebillet and PinkPantheress.

Now, it is extending its link-up with Goodlive to cover all of the German promoter’s festivals. The new agreement makes Dice the official and exclusive ticketing and sales platform for Melt, Splash!, Full Force and Heroes Festival, as well as the main ticket provider for Superbloom Festival.

“Dice meets our ideas of modern ticketing, and we have been missing such a platform on the German market so far”

“Dice has been successful in international ticketing for many years and is already popular with fans,” says Goodlive MD Marko Hegner. “We were pleased to be the official partner for the launch of Dice in Germany this year – after Goodlive Artists, and now also with our festivals. Dice convinces us on the one hand with its mobile-first concept, which also prevents resale on the secondary market, and on the other hand with its fair and transparent pricing. Dice meets our ideas of modern ticketing, and we have been missing such a platform on the German market so far.”

The official pre-sale for the festivals splash!, Full Force and Melt 2023 is already underway via Dice. If the festivals sell out, tickets can be returned via the Waiting List within the secure framework of the app and resold at fair prices.

“We’re delighted with how fans and the live industry are reacting to our roll out in Germany,” adds Andrew Foggin, global head of music at Dice. “We’ve already had some great success stories with Goodlive Artists and to expand the partnership with the festivals was a natural next step. Their festival portfolio is exceptional, from globally recognised brands like Splash! and Melt through to more recent properties like Superbloom, fans of all genres are catered for.”

 


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