x

The latest industry news to your inbox.


I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

Final plans for Bristol Arena revealed

Final plans have been submitted for the long-awaited YTL Arena Bristol, in the southwest of England.

After a series of delays, the 19,000-capacity arena is set to be built at Fliton Airfield and could open by late 2026.

New artist impressions show the airfield’s Brabazon Hangars transformed into the UK’s fourth-largest indoor arena and flanked by new conference and exhibition halls.

An estimated 300,000 people are expected to attend events at YTL Arena Bristol each year, boosting the local economy by £60 million annually.

“The arena finds itself in an ideal position to evolve into a cultural hub”

The arena site is set to include restaurants and bars, an outdoor cinema, basketball and football courts, a pump track for cycling, a Christmas ice rink and huge public squares.

YTL, the Malaysian developer behind the arena, is also building a new neighbourhood on the airfield with thousands of homes, a park, community facilities, leisure and employment, with a new train station due to open there in mid-2026.

“The arena finds itself in an ideal position to evolve into a cultural hub,” said architects McGregor Coxall.

The venue has experienced a number of delays related to Covid and the construction industry, with site preparation finally beginning in March.

Decontamination work is underway and will be followed by the demolition of non-essential structures ahead of the main construction programme, which is said to take around two-and-a-half years once builders move in.

rival arena, operated by Live Nation and Oak View Group (OVG), is set to open in Cardiff, Wales, in spring 2025.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

PRS Foundation launches fund for emerging promoters

PRS Foundation has launched a new fund for ‘early-career’ music promoters in England, in a bid to bolster grassroots music ecosystems.

Through the Early Career Promoter Fund, grants of up to £3,500 will be available to support activities, including:

The fund – supported by Arts Council England and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) – will also help to address underrepresentation, according to a release, ensuring support reaches a diverse range of promoters.

The initiative comes as the UK live industry rallies around the ongoing crisis in the grassroots music sector. Last month, artists and managers backed the Music Venue Trust’s (MVT) calls for a compulsory £1 levy on tickets sold for UK live music events above 5,000-cap.

“Independent promoters play a vital role in identifying and platforming talent”

Joe Frankland, CEO of PRS Foundation says: “The grassroots music sector plays a crucial role in bolstering scenes and developing talent while driving the economic, cultural and social success of music nationally. We’re delighted to manage the Early Career Promoter Fund in partnership with Arts Council England and DCMS to offer funding and capacity-building support to hundreds of independent promoters who – alongside venues, festivals, artists and crews – will help to build a more robust and diverse live music sector. We’re looking forward to see who applies and to supporting exciting music events across England.”

Claire Mera-Nelson, director, Music at Arts Council England, adds “We’re delighted to be supporting PRS Foundation to develop and deliver the Early Career Promoter Fund. Independent promoters play a vital role in identifying and platforming talent and helping build audiences through partnership with venues and festivals. Helping develop the skills and insight of promoters at the early stages of their career and backing their energy and enthusiasm will play an important role in securing the future of the grassroots music sector. Today’s Supporting Grassroots Music investment from both Arts Council England and the UK Government reaffirms our commitment to supporting this vital element of the music industry and is an ideal complement to the Arts Council’s own Supporting Grassroots Music fund which is open to more established independent promoters.”

DCMS Culture Secretary, Lucy Frazer, comments: “The UK’s grassroots music sector is vital to helping the next generation of best-selling artists launch their careers and build fanbases. Promoters are a key part of this story, from booking and promoting shows, to hiring production crews and supporting musicians to reach new audiences.

“These government-funded grants will give promoters targeted support so they can provide platforms for a more diverse range of artists, access mentoring and coaching, and build sustainable careers in the creative industries.”

Promoters can apply for Early Career Promoter Fund support from PRS Foundation’s website. Full eligibility criteria and funding guidance will be available soon and the application portal will open on Thursday 2nd May 2024.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

DHP Family’s charity festival raises £81k for unhoused

DHP Family’s charity festival Beat The Streets has announced its January event raised £81,600 for the unhoused population across the East Midlands region of England.

All proceeds raised by the one-day festival go to Framework, a Nottingham-based charity that provides a network of support for at-risk and homeless individuals in the region. Since its inception in 2018, the multi-venue event has raised £490,600 for the charity.

This year, funds will be dedicated to supporting the charity’s Street Outreach team, which engages with the local homeless community daily. Money raised during Beat The Streets will “cover a large part of the cost” to help secure a quarter of the team, which came under risk after Nottingham City Council reduced funding to the charity, said Framework’ CEO Andrew Redfern.

“The level of rough sleeping continues to rise relentlessly,” Redfern says. “Funds raised at the 2024 festival back in January will help us maintain the outreach team who work with people on the streets of Nottingham every day of the year.”

“We’ve been able to make another significant contribution to the hard work that Framework do, at a particularly vital time”

Nottingham’s rough sleeper population is growing nearly 20% every year, per Framework, as the housing association works to provide housing, health, employment support, and care services to 18,500 people per year.

The festival’s seventh annual, which took place on 28 January, featured special guests Beats on Toast, Fat Digester, Lois, George Gadd + The Aftermath, along with more than 50 local artists. All proceeds from tickets, bar purchases and merchandise went directly to Framework.

“The funds raised each year at our event make a tangible difference to the lives of homeless people in the area, and thanks to everyone who attended, performed at, and worked on our 2024 event, we’ve been able to make another significant contribution to the hard work that Framework do, at a particularly vital time,” says DHP Family’s MD George Akins.

Beat The Streets is delivered by DHP Family in collaboration with local organisations and music groups, including I’m Not from London; Farmyard Records; Hockley Hustle, and Rough Trade.

DHP Family also owns and operates the 25,000-capacity Splendour Festival — which has been cancelled for 2024 — and multiple venues across the UK. The organisation also promotes concerts and tours while also operating independent ticketing platform alt. tickets.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ IndexIQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Preparation work begins on long-awaited Bristol arena

Site preparation has finally begun on the long-awaited YTL Arena Bristol, in the southwest of England.

The 19,000-capacity arena, which was delayed due to Covid- and construction industry-related delays, could now open by late 2026.

The project will see the Brabazon Hangars – once a vital part of England’s aviation past – transformed into the UK’s fourth-largest indoor arena.

The initial phase of the YTL Arena began with the decontamination of the site carried out by Omega Environmental Services. That will be followed by the demolition of non-essential structures and then, the main construction programme.

YTL Construction UK, a new company that will be part of the international YTL Group, will be responsible for the construction of the venue.

The company previously operated in Malaysia, China, Japan, Singapore, and Australia across a range of sectors including energy, water, rail and property development.

“Once main construction has started, we estimate it being a two-and-a-half-year build programme”

“We’re pleased with the progress and are pushing forward, albeit slower than originally planned,” says Andrew Billingham, CEO of YTL Arena Bristol.

“Handing over the Hangars to Omega represents a pivotal milestone. We have tackled challenges head-on making crucial decisions to expedite the opening while ensuring we deliver one of the premier arenas in Europe. Once main construction has started, we estimate it being a two-and-a-half-year build programme.”

“It is well documented that construction companies are facing difficulties, and with the international experience the YTL Group has in construction and project management, it is a logical step for us to control the whole process through to operation.”

The arena will be 100% electric, making it one of the first venues in the UK to operate without the use of fossil fuels.

YTL Arena will be operated predominantly as a music venue, with approximately 70–75% of programming being concerts.

rival arena, operated by Live Nation and Oak View Group (OVG), is set to open in Cardiff, Wales, in spring 2025.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

MOBO Awards plans three-day festival in Sheffield

The MOBO Awards, the annual British awards show honouring music of Black origin, is launching a new three-day festival.

In anticipation of the awards’ first ceremony in Sheffield on 7 February, the city will host a range of festivities under the banner MOBO Awards Sheffield – The Fringe.

The fringe event, supported by Sheffield City Council, will include workshops, a customised market, panel discussions and a talent showcase at the Crucible Theatre celebrating the Black, African and Caribbean culture of Yorkshire.

The 5 February showcase will feature performances from Ashanti Morgan, Aziza Jaye, Dizz Deejay, DJ Law, Franz Von, JxK, Keyz TenTen, L Dizz, Maasai, MYNA, Ra’Siah, Roy Cropper, W4nnjiro and The Sheff Allstars Riddem.

“It will see the city embrace both the beats and flavours of Africa and the Caribbean”

Speaking about the Fringe event, Sheffield city councillor Martin Smith said: “It will see the city embrace both the beats and flavours of Africa and the Caribbean and is a testament to the power of the music and culture on offer in our city. MOBO Awards Sheffield – The Fringe is going to be an unforgettable experience for Sheffield and our communities, and I hope everyone is able to get involved and enjoy what’s on offer.”

The 26th edition of the MOBO Awards will take place at Utilita Arena on 7 February with live performances from acts including DJ Spoony, Byron Messia and Soul II Soul.

Nominees for the 2024 ceremony were announced in December, with Little Mix and Stormzy leading the way with four nominations apiece. Central Cee, PinkPantheress, J Hus and Raye have received three nominations each.

It was announced yesterday (22 January) that comedian Babatúndé Aléshé and presenter Indiyah Polack will host the awards.

Little Simz, Knucks, Central Cee, PinkPantheress and the late Jamal Edwards were among the winners at last year’s event, staged at London’s OVO Arena Wembley.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Elton John’s historic Glasto set smashes records

Elton John looks to have smashed attendance and viewership records for the last UK show of his farewell tour at Glastonbury.

The 76-year-old legend delivered a two-hour set packed with hits from across his five-decades-long career, including ‘Pinball Wizard’ which he hadn’t performed in over a decade.

Early estimates had the Sunday night performance as one of the most-attended of all time – possibly eclipsing Dolly Parton in 2014 – with at least 120,000 in the audience.

Meanwhile, 7.6 million tuned in to watch live on BBC One – the biggest-ever overnight audience for a Glastonbury set.

In comparison, in 2022 Diana Ross was the most-watched star with 3.1m and Paul McCartney’s headline set was seen by 2.7m.

“I never thought I’d play Glastonbury – and here I am,” he said. “I’m so happy to be here. I won’t ever forget this. It’s a very special and emotional night for me as it may be my last show in England, in Great Britain. I’d better play well and I’d better entertain you because you’ve been standing there so long.”

7.6 million tuned in to watch live on BBC One – the biggest-ever overnight audience for a Glastonbury set

The 21-song set included hits such as ‘The Bitch Is Back’, ‘Bennie and the Jet’ and ‘I’m Still Standing,’ as well as a number of guest appearances.

Jacob Lusk of US soul group Gabriels accompanied John on ‘Are You Ready For Love’, Rina Sawayama took Kiki Dee’s place on ‘Don’t Go Breaking My Heart’ and The Killers’ Brandon Flowers appeared for ‘Tiny Dancer’. Nashville’s Stephen Sanchez even got to sing a song of his own, ‘Until I Found You’.

John drew the curtain on his UK touring career with an extended version of ‘Rocket Man’. “It’s been an incredible journey and I’ve had the best, best time,” said the star, with a lump in his throat.

The show came toward the end of Elton’s Farewell Yellow Brick Road tour – now officially the highest-grossing tour of all time, with box office receipts of $887m (£697m).

After Glastonbury, there are just seven dates left, with the final show in Stockholm on 8 July.

John’s performance drew the 2023 Glastonbury festival to a close, after high-profile sets from Arctic Monkeys, Guns N’ Roses, Lana Del Rey, WizKid, Lizzo, Blondie and Cat Stevens.

Friday’s headliner Arctic Monkeys saw a record performance for a Friday night headline set with a peak audience of 2.6m, while audiences for Saturday’s headliner Guns N’ Roses on BBC Two peaked at 2.1m.

Lewis Capaldi’s and Lizzo’s Pyramid Stage performances on Saturday had a BBC One audience peak 2.4m.

Organiser Emily Eavis has confirmed the event will return next year, with two female headliners already booked.


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Robbie Williams to perform at Sandringham Estate

Robbie Williams is set to play at the Royal Estate of Sandringham in Norfolk, England, next summer.

The show will be the first-ever large-scale live music event to be hosted on the 20,000-acre estate owned by the Royal Family and is taking place on Saturday 26 August 2023.

The concert, which will be Williams’ only outdoor headline show in the UK next year, is staged by Heritage Live – a promoter that specialises in putting on gigs at some of England’s most historic landmarks, stately homes and estates.

“It’s been an ambition of us all at Heritage Live to stage a concert for the legendary Robbie Williams”

Heritage Live promoter Giles Cooper says: “It’s been an ambition of us all at Heritage Live to stage a concert for the legendary Robbie Williams and the thing about Robbie is that he keeps getting better and better!

“His 2022 arena tour show was the best I’d ever seen him perform and for me he’s the best entertainer since Elvis!  We can’t wait!  It will be the most magical concert in the most amazing surroundings that’ll live in our memories for ever!”

Upcoming gigs from Heritage Live include Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds and Soft Cell, each performing headline shows at Audley End in Saffron Walden, Essex.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

European trade bodies rally governments for energy aid

European live music trade bodies are lobbying for government-backed support packages to mitigate rocketing energy bills and prevent the sector from collapsing.

Last month, IQ heard from a number of European arenas who say that skyrocketing energy costs are emerging as the sector’s biggest challenge since the Covid-19 pandemic. ASM Global’s Marie Lindqvist said the prices for electricity and gas at the company’s venues have quadrupled since the beginning of the year, with the UK being hit the hardest.

UK live music trade bodies today (21 September) welcomed the government’s Energy Bill Relief Scheme for businesses but have called for further clarification of the details.

The scheme, revealed by the Department for Business, Energy and Industry, will see energy bills for UK businesses cut by around half of their expected level this winter.

The news comes after it was revealed that some UK live music venues are seeing their energy bills increase by an average of 300% –in some cases as much as 740% – adding tens of thousands of pounds to their running costs.

Under the new scheme, wholesale prices are expected to be fixed for all non-domestic energy customers at £211 per MWh for electricity and £75 per MWh for gas for six months between 1 October and 31 March 2023.

The support is equivalent to the Energy Price Guarantee put in place for households and applies to fixed contracts agreed on or after 1 April 2022, as well as to deemed, variable and flexible tariffs and contracts.

UK live music trade bodies today welcomed the government’s Energy Bill Relief Scheme for businesses

This scheme will apply to England, Scotland, and Wales, with a parallel scheme will be established in Northern Ireland, and will be reviewed after three months with an option to extend support for “vulnerable businesses”. However, it is not yet clear whether the live music sector falls into this category.

LIVE CEO Jon Collins welcomes the support but says the government must sustain it past the next six months. “Spiralling energy prices have already forced music venues up and down the country to close or curtail their programming and this will begin again as soon as this support is removed – it is plainly obvious that live music must be on the list of sectors considered ‘vulnerable’ by government.

“With our industry still hurting from the aftereffects of Covid and rising costs across the supply chain, we continue to make the case that our sector needs action on VAT and business rates if we are to keep all concert halls, arenas, festivals, and grassroots music venues open, bringing joy to millions and showcasing the best UK and international talent.”

Music Venue Trust (MVT) CEO and founder Mark Davyd has also warmly welcomed the package, saying the scheme “appears at face value to comprehensively tackle the immediate short-term energy crisis for grassroots music venues”.

“We await full details of the scheme and the method of implementation by the energy retailers and suppliers, but the base unit rate of 21.1p per kW/h laid out by these plans is sufficient to avert the collapse of the sector if it is fully delivered,” says Davyd.

“We understand that the government plans to bring forward controls to ensure that this target price is delivered and we look forward to reading their plans to implement this rate as a maximum for all music venues in the UK.”

The scheme “appears at face value to comprehensively tackle the immediate short-term energy crisis for GMVs”

However, MVT is also urging the government to clarify which sectors fall into the “vulnerable businesses” category: “The government has indicated that ‘pubs’ will attract support for longer than the six-month initial period based on the special circumstances of the energy crisis in relation to the operation of their business.

“We have asked for urgent clarification that the broad term ‘pub’ includes music venues and other licensed premises essential to the grassroots music ecosystem, and anticipate that this will be the case.”

The trade bodies have pointed out that further support is needed, in addition to the scheme, in order to stabilise the sector after the Covid-19 pandemic. The sector is calling on the Chancellor to reduce VAT on ticket sales to 5% and reform business rates in the mini-budget expected this Friday (23 September).

Elsewhere in Europe, markets including the Netherlands and Germany are still lobbying for critical support to curb “disastrous” energy costs for live music businesses.

In the Netherlands, the Association of Theatre and Concert Hall Directors (VSCD) says a large proportion of its 151 members are in danger of getting into financial trouble due to rising energy costs and inflation.

“For many venues, the rise in energy costs is disastrous. The expectation for next year is that we will be seven times more expensive. Even if we sell out every performance, this cost increase is impossible to absorb,” says Mirjam Radstake, director of Theater Hanzehof and Buitensociëteit in Zutphen.

VSCD is calling on the Dutch government to help local authorities subsidise venues’ energy bills

With only 7% of its members receiving some form of compensation to cover the costs, VSCD is calling on the Dutch government to make an extra contribution to the municipal fund so that local authorities can subsidise venues’ energy bills.

The association argues that, currently, subsidies do not reflect venues’ rising costs, which also include a 9.7% rise in rent and a 10% increase in the minimum wage, and that passing these costs onto the public is not an option.

“If we increase the ticket price, the public will drop out,” says Charles Droste, director of Cultuurbedrijf Amphion in Doetinchem.

“At the moment, 25% fewer tickets have been sold with us in September than in September 2019. The public seems to be waiting for rising energy costs and inflation.”

Earlier this week, the Taskforce Creative Culture and Media also sent a letter to the cabinet, containing a general plea to protect the sector against the current inflation and increased energy costs.

Meanwhile, Germany’s live association, the Federal Association of the Concert and Event Industry (BDKV), is calling on the federal government to design a special relief programme for the events industry to put forward to the EU Commission.

Germany’s live association is calling on the federal government to design a special relief programme for the events industry

Earlier this year, the EU Commission adopted a Temporary Crisis Framework which enabled member states to be more flexible with State aid rules in order to support the economy during Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Under the framework, member states could grant a limited amount of aid to companies affected by the crisis, or by the subsequent sanctions and countersanctions, up to the increased amount of €62,000 and €75,000 in the agriculture and fisheries and aquaculture sectors respectively, and up to €500,000 in all other sectors.

However, in the plan, the EU Commission does not count the events industry among the “systemically important” sectors eligible for aid. BDKV is now asking for a revision to the framework, to allow businesses in the events industry to receive up to €500,000.

“Without state support, there is a risk of the industry collapsing with bankruptcies, operational closures and further migration of skilled workers and the self-employed,” reads a statement from BDKV. “This special programme is needed now and not in the near future when such help is already too late.”

Timo Feuerbach, MD of the European Association of Event Centers (EVVC), says: “The events industry has not yet recovered from the corona-related restrictions of the past few years. The consequences of the war in Ukraine, high inflation and impending bottlenecks in the energy supply are also hitting us hard. Together with the disastrous communication from the federal government on the subject of Corona, which is unsettling customers and is already costing orders, our industry is in danger of being left behind in international competition.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

England to scrap all remaining Covid restrictions

The English live music industry has welcomed the government’s plans to lift all remaining coronavirus restrictions.

Prime minister Boris Johnson today (21 February) announced the ‘Living with Covid-19’ plan which will put an end to self-isolation and free testing.

From Thursday (25 February), the legal requirement to self-isolate after a positive Covid test will be removed in England.

Meanwhile, free Covid testing – which has reportedly cost £15.7 billion – will end for the general public in England from 1 April.

The PM says restrictions can be lifted now because the levels of immunity are high and deaths are low.

“This is not back to business as usual for festivals and it is not a case of ‘job done’ for ministers”

The live music industry has hailed the end of Covid-19 restrictions as a “huge relief” but warns that ongoing support from the government is needed.

Paul Reed, CEO of the Association of Independent Festivals (AIF), says: “While we welcome legal restrictions around Covid-19 coming to an end and the prospect of a full capacity festival season, the effects of the pandemic are still being felt by the independent festival sector and the need for government action remains. With festival organisers facing crippling cost increases of up to 30% across operations and infrastructure, this is not back to business as usual for festivals and it is not a case of ‘job done’ for ministers.

“AIF reiterates its call for ongoing support from government in the form of continued VAT relief on festival tickets to maintain the current reduced 12.5% rate on tickets beyond the end of March; and to also explore some form of government-backed loan scheme for suppliers to alleviate some of these pressures and encourage investment in the festival supply chain.”

Greg Parmley, CEO, LIVE says: “The end of Covid-19 restrictions represents a huge, welcome relief to the live music sector, which lost billions in revenue throughout the pandemic. But with spiralling costs and thousands of companies struggling with pandemic debt, it’s crucial that government does not abandon and set the sector adrift, just as it starts to tread water again.

“We are calling for a reverse to the planned hike in VAT rates and the imminent end to business rates relief in order to avoid further business closures and job losses within our sector.”

“The extension of VAT & Business rates relief remains a key ask”

Michael Kill, CEO of NTIA, says: “The withdrawal of the remaining covid restrictions is welcomed by the industry, and will further support business recovery and go some way to regaining customer confidence.

“Our responsibility to keep customers and staff safe remains our focus, maintaining baseline mitigations as we have done since the 19th July 2021.

“Experts have suggested that recovery to pre covid trading levels will take several years, but we cannot lose sight of the short term role that the government must continue to play in supporting the sector, beginning with the chancellor’s budget in March.

“The extension of VAT & Business rates relief remains a key ask, allowing businesses the financial headroom to survive, on this long road to recovery.

“Given the commitment and support, over the last two years, that the sector has given to the government’s public health strategy, it is only right that they recognise and support the hardest-hit industries through the final phase of this crisis.”

Greg Marshall, general manager of Association for Electronic Music (AFEM), says: “AFEM welcomes the end of all legal Covid-19 regulations and the move to guidance announced in the UK today. However, the fragility of the chain of businesses and individuals which make up the electronic music club and events ecosystem needs to be recognised. Ongoing support measures will be required to ensure the recovery of this sector, in parallel with industry action to build consumer confidence and ensure a return of audience numbers to all event types in the long term”.

England follows in the footsteps of DenmarkSweden, the Netherlands, Finland, Germany, Austria and Switzerland – all of which have recently announced plans to lift all remaining restrictions.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

More European markets set to relax restrictions

Several European countries have begun relaxing Covid restrictions amid hopes the Omicron wave has peaked in certain parts of the continent.

Large indoor events will resume and nightclubs permitted to reopen in Scotland from 24 January in acknowledgement of a “severe fall” in infection rates. Outdoor events were given the green light to welcome back spectators from 17 January.

The tightened measures had been in place since 26 December last year. First minister Nicola Sturgeon told MSPs the country had “turned the corner on the Omicron wave”, as reported positive cases dropped to 20,268 over the last three days compared to 36,526 in the same period last week.

In England, all remaining coronavirus measures – including mandatory self-isolation for confirmed infections – could be lifted as early as March under plans being drawn up by the government.

In Wales, the number of people allowed to attend an outdoor event rose from 50 to 500 from 15 January. From this Friday, crowds will be allowed to return to sporting events and there will be no limits on those attending outdoor events.

The developments provide renewed encouragement for the live sector after a growing number of early 2022 tours were cancelled or postponed over Covid fears

And from Friday 28 January, nightclubs can reopen and hospitality venues will be allowed to operate normally, although Covid passes will still be required for large events, cinemas, nightclubs and theatres.

The developments provide renewed encouragement for the live sector after a growing number of early 2022 tours were cancelled or postponed over Covid fears.

However, in Sweden, a 500 capacity limit is being imposed on live events from tomorrow (19 January), although an event is permitted to host more than 500 people if the organiser divides the room so that participants from different sections do not come into contact with each other. In such cases, the 500-person limit applies to each section.

Research from the Netherlands, meanwhile, suggests the country’s 2G (covering people who have either vaccinated or recovered from Covid in the past six months) and 3G (vaccinated/recovered/tested negative) restrictions are cutting cases by just under 10% and 5% respectively.

The Dutch live sector’s hopes for a swift reopening were dashed over the weekend, with a review on the reopening of cultural venues not due to take place until 25 January.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.