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Dansk Live partners with CTS Eventim’s Billetlugen

Denmark’s live music association has partnered with one of the country’s leading ticketing services to provide its members with key insights into ticket sales and marketing.

CTS Eventim’s Billetlugen will deliver knowledge about spending habits, social media trends and audience insights to Dansk Live in order to help its 120 members boost ticket sales.

“We are looking forward to starting a closer collaboration with Dansk Live and all the members,” says Jens B Arnesen, managing director at Billetlugen.

“In recent years, we have worked purposefully to convert our extensive data into knowledge about trends and marketing. With that as a starting point, we look forward to contributing with analyses, insights and concrete sessions that can support ticket sales.”

“We look forward to both us and the members being able to learn something new that can promote and develop ticket sales”

Esben Marcher, head of secretariat at Dansk Live, adds: “We are happy to enter into cooperation with Billetlugen, and we look forward to both us and the members being able to learn something new that can promote and develop ticket sales. In addition, it is also a great asset to have access to the knowledge Billetlugen shares with us when we speak for the organisers as part of our political work.”

Dansk Live’s membership includes some of Denmark’s biggest and best-known festivals such as Roskilde, Northside, Smukfest and Tinderbox.

Billetlugen’s parent company, CTS Eventim, is Europe’s leading ticketing provider in 21 countries and also operates venues & manages events worldwide.

 


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Dansk Live launches climate calculator

Danish trade body Danish Live is launching a climate calculator to help event organisers reduce their environmental footprint.

The innovation allows users to make calculations in the areas of waste, water, transport and energy, measuring consumption and optimising potential solutions from year-to-year.

“There are now many different climate calculators out there, but they are often very complicated or based on international emission factors,” says Søren Stochholm of developer World Perfect. “Dansk Live’s climate calculator is made very simple, and it is based on the Danish emission factors. This means that it is much easier for the smaller players to start measuring, and that the results are more accurate.

“Over time, the climate calculator can of course be developed so that it will give an even more accurate picture, but for now it is a bid for a common and simple way to learn more about the industry’s total CO2 footprint.”

“This calculator, which can be used freely by members of Dansk Live, makes it easy to get started with the absolutely necessary work”

Stochholm ran a webinar for Dansk Live members last week, giving an introduction on how to use the climate calculator.

“Several larger organisers in the membership have developed their own monitoring methods, but not everyone has the opportunity to have their own made or has the resources to acquire one,” says Esben Marcher, head of secretariat at Dansk Live. “This calculator, which can be used freely by members of Dansk Live, makes it easy to get started with the absolutely necessary work. The calculator is targeted at all types of organisers and can also be used by the venues.

“Now the organisers have to start using the calculator, but it could be exciting if we could create an overview of the industry’s overall climate impact in the various areas and the potential for improvements across the industry.”

 


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Dansk Live announces new chair Rikke Andersen

Dansk Live has announced a new chair, following the resignation of longtime board member Lars Månsson Sloth.

A unanimous board has voted Rikke Andersen as the new chair of the Danish live music association.

Andersen is the day-to-day manager at Herning-based live music venue Fermaten and became a member of Dansk Live’s board in April 2021.

She will be supported by deputy board leader Søren Eskildsen, who is the spokesperson for Smukfest.

Commenting on her new position, Andersen says: “Dansk Live is a strong and important organisation in the Danish live industry. In particular, the time with corona shutdowns has shown how important it is that we can work together across festivals and venues, geography and size. Therefore, I am looking forward to continuing the good development of the organisation together with the rest of the board of Dansk Live.”

“The shutdowns showed how important it is that we can work together across festivals and venues, geography and size”

Eskildsen adds: “I look forward to continuing as deputy board leader in a strong group on the board. Rikke has a fantastic commitment and I am looking forward to her taking up the position as board leader. It has always been a pleasure for me on the board that the representatives of the festivals and venues have such a strong collaboration for the common good of members.”

Anders Mortensen of Copenhagen-based live music venue, VEGA, joins the board after Månsson Sloth’s resignation.

Thomas Larsen, Nibe Festival, joined the board in June, after Sidse Gry Jeppesen resigned from his position at ALICE, and is thus no longer a member of the board.

 


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The LGBTIQ+ List 2022: Alexander Rastén Rydberg, Dansk Live

The LGBTIQ+ List 2022 – IQ Magazine’s second annual celebration of queer professionals who make an immense impact in the international live music business – was published in the Pride edition (issue 112) this month.

The July 2022 issue, which is available to read now, was made possible thanks to support from Ticketmaster. 

To get to know this year’s queer pioneers a little better, we interviewed each individual on their challenges, triumphs, advice and more.

Throughout the next month, IQ will publish a new interview each day, starting with Alexander Rastén Rydberg (he/him/his), head of diversity and talent management at Dansk Live in Denmark.

 


Tell us about a personal triumph in your career
In 2022, I was appointed vice president of the Nightlife Committee in Copenhagen by the mayor of culture. It’s been three long years fighting for queer and minority rights in nightlife that culminated in a position from where I (and the Copenhagen Club Commission) can actually make changes to the cultural system and introduce safer spaces, awareness policies and minority positions to conventional nightlife across the city.

What advice could you give to young queer professionals?
This is your world. You’re never alone. Trust your gut. The current most progressive initiatives in the Danish live industry are started by queer and minority communities. You’re a part of that generational wave. Don’t let the heteronormative structure tell you anything else.

One thing the live industry could do to be a more inclusive place?
Many cultural experiences only cater to a cis- and straight-oriented crowd. This is a fact, but it’s not totally acknowledged in the live industry. In order to act on this, we have to learn and listen to the minorities that are excluded, on many different aspects. Only then can we create more inclusiveness.

“The first dance floor on which I could kiss my boyfriend without getting comments was created by Ved Siden Af”

A cause you support
Together WE PUSH. In Denmark, we have some very sad and ridiculous integrations laws that result in women and kids getting stuck in deportation camps. Together WE PUSH is helping these refugee families – organising football games for kids and so on.

The queer act you’re itching to see live this year
Lil Nas X. I absolutely love how he provokes the whole heteronormative world just by being himself. Also, he is quite handsome…

Your favourite queer space
Ved Siden Af – one of the only queer-friendly techno venues in Copenhagen. The crew that runs it have played an important role in my life as a younger queer person. The first dance floor on which I could kiss my boyfriend without getting comments was created by Ved Siden Af, and they continue to challenge the conventional majority norms in the clubbing scene.

 


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LGBTIQ+ List 2022: This year’s queer pioneers revealed

IQ Magazine has revealed this year’s LGBTIQ+ List – the second annual celebration of queer professionals who make an immense impact in the international live music business.

The landmark list is the centrepiece of IQs second Pride edition, which will be available for subscribers online and in print, in the coming days.

The 20 individuals comprising the LGBTIQ+ List 2022 – as nominated by our readers and verified by our esteemed steering committee – are individuals that have gone above and beyond to wave the flag for an industry that we can all be proud of.

The sophomore class comprises agents, promoters, CFOs, CIOs, tour managers, marketing managers and more – all of whom identify as LGBTIQ+ and, in the face of adversity, have made enormous contributions to their respective sectors.

In alphabetical order, the LGBTIQ+ List 2022 is:

Alexander Rastén Rydberg, head of diversity and talent management, Dansk Live (DK)
Alexandra Ampofo, promoter, Metropolis Music (UK)
Can Büyükcinar, head of operations, Wizard Promotions Konzertagentur (DE)
Cloe Gregson, senior events manager, Manchester Pride (UK)
David Davies, founder and head of live, Double D Live (UK, IE)
David Jones, chief information officer, AEG Global Technology (UK)
Georgie Lanfranchi, tour manager for Years & Years, Only Helix (UK)
Hatice Arıcı, promoting director/ artist agent, Charmenko (TR)
James Fleury, marketing lead, Ticket Swap (NL)
Jill Wheeler, director of booking, Red Mountain Entertainment (US)
Joel Siviour, director & booking agent, Seismic Talent Agency (AU)
Jonas Sjödén, CFO, Live Nation Sweden (SE)
Natalie Rudland, senior promotions assistant, Live Nation (UK)
Nikos Kazoleas, agent, UTA (UK)
Nix Corporan, fan support team lead, DICE (US)
Patrick Erhardt, senior manager content & creation, Goodlive (DE)
Patrick Janssen, marketing manager, Live Nation Germany (DE)
Paul Bonham, director of professional development, MMF (UK)
Peter Taylor, promoter, Cuffe and Taylor (UK)
Troy Suda, chief product officer, Ticketmaster (UK)

Throughout the next month, IQ will be publishing full-length profiles of each person on the LGBTIQ+ List 2022.

“We work in an industry that aims to entertain the entire population. And that population is made up of extremely diverse audiences,” says Ticketmaster’s Troy Suda in his profile.

Joel Siviour, Seismic Talent Agency, adds: “I’ve witnessed plenty of virtue-signaling from within our industry, but when push comes to shove there are companies whose actions don’t align with the values they claim to hold.”

Check out last year’s cohort of queer pioneers here.

 


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Dansk Live chair Lars Månsson Sloth steps down

Dansk Live is on the lookout for a new chair following the resignation of longtime board member Lars Månsson Sloth.

Sloth, who has also stepped down from his position at music organisation Gimle, joined the board at the Danish trade body in 2012 and has served as chair since 2018.

“Lars has been of great importance to the association’s development in recent years, and his routine and his friendly and calm disposition will be missed,” it says a statement.

“Lars was a great support to the secretariat’s work”

Esben Marcher, head of secretariat at Dansk Live, credits Sloth for his crisis management work during the pandemic.

“The dialogue between the board and the secretariat of Dansk Live is very close, and my collaboration has been particularly close with Lars,” says Marcher. “Lars has helped to move Dansk Live as an association – both organisationally and politically.

“Lars was a great support to the secretariat’s work, not least during the corona crisis, and I would like to take this opportunity to thank him many times for the cooperation”

Deputy chair Søren Eskildsen will take over temporarily until a permanent replacement is found.

 


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Danish festivals report strong resurgence

Ticket sales for many festivals in Denmark this summer are on a par with pre-Covid levels, according to promoters.

Events including Roskilde Festival, Smukfest and Copenhell are already sold out, with a number of others reporting near sell-outs.

Dansk Live adds that ticket sales are also booming at Northside and Tinderbox, with both on course to break their previous records.

“In terms of sales, both festivals are going great,” says Pernille Høll, head of marketing at Down the Drain, which runs the two festivals. “Northside gets its second or best year in history. Tinderbox gets its best.”

“It is extremely nice to see that the audience is once again looking for the community around live music”

Elsewhere, Jelling Music Festival is also on track for an impressive comeback.

“We can clearly see that people are really looking forward to getting on the grass again,” says co-founder and manager Lars Charlie Mortensen. “We see this clearly in ticket sales. People buy all kinds of tickets at the moment – both day tickets and for the whole festival, and we expect to get a full house.”

Dansk Live’s head of secretariat Esben Marcher is delighted with how the market is rebounding.

“We can only interpret the high sales figures as meaning that the audience still loves live music,” he says. “After some hard years for all live organisers, it is extremely nice to see that the audience is once again looking for the community around live music.”

“It is unfortunately no surprise that the younger target groups are not yet fully involved”

While Nibe Festival manager Peter Møller Madsen reports similarly strong sales, he observes that teenagers have been slower to buy tickets than in the pre-pandemic era – a trend he attributes to the two-year break.

“They have not inherited the tradition,” he says. “However, we believe that they will probably come, so we are very confident.”

Marcher adds: “Although overall ticket sales at the Danish festivals are doing well, it is unfortunately no surprise that the younger target groups are not yet fully involved. We have been without the great festival experiences for two years, and thus there are two new vintages who have not yet been to a festival, and thus may not be so eager to get tickets. However, that trend will hopefully improve over time.”

 


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Dansk Live survey highlights Covid talent drain

A new report by Dansk Live highlights the exodus of backstage talent from the concert industry as a result of the pandemic.

The Danish trade association surveyed the country’s concert and festival organisers during February and March 2022, with 17.2% reporting they have fewer employees today than in 2019.

Dansk Live says a large number of roles have not been re-occupied since the business returned from the coronavirus shutdown, emphasising there is still work to be done to return the domestic sector to full-strength.

The findings are in line with a trend seen across the international live music industry, with a UNESCO study showing that 10 million jobs had been lost across the international cultural industry during Covid-19.

“The consequences of the pandemic are long-lasting”

“Unfortunately, the survey confirms the trend we have also seen with our international colleagues, namely that there are fewer employees in the live industry now than before corona,” says Esben Marcher, head of secretariat at Dansk Live. “The consequences of the pandemic are long-lasting, and this decline is unfortunately a good example of this.”

Last month, Denmark became the first country in the EU to lift all coronavirus measures. But the organisation warned reopening was “not a silver bullet” as promoters still faced major challenges.

Marcher, who has also warned of low confidence among organisers and suppliers and says it will take time for the “natural caution” to disappear, is echoing UNESCO’s calls for political support to aid the industry’s restart.

“It emphasises that there is still a need for the political side to focus on restarting the music and culture sector, so that, among other things, the live industry can get back on its feet after the corona,” he says.

 


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Denmark: ‘Reopening is not a silver bullet’

Denmark’s live association Dansk Live says that the live industry continues to be challenged despite reopening.

On 5 February, Denmark became the first country in the EU to lift all coronavirus measures but Dansk Live warns that concert organisers are still facing major challenges.

“Although the majority of the country’s organisers have survived the crisis, the challenges are clear in many places,” says head of secretariat Esben Marcher.

“Not only has the audience not yet fully returned to the concerts. Many places are challenged on the crucial voluntary commitment, and also the prices of things like materials which are sky-high.”

“These organisers are now in a situation where there is no room for manoeuvre to make the necessary investments”

He continues: “The crisis has been both deep and long and despite compensation schemes and various pools, many have had to dig deep into savings, take out loans, etc. These organisers are now in a situation where there is no room for manoeuvre to make the necessary investments in organisation and facilities. At worst, it could hit them hard in the time to come.”

Marcher also warns of low confidence among organisers and suppliers and says it will take time for the “natural caution” to disappear.

“Internally in the industry, the crisis has left deep traces,” he says. “The dialogue between organisers and suppliers of all kinds takes place in many places in clear memory of the time we have been through. Confidence that the planned will be implemented must be rebuilt, and there is a natural caution that will probably only disappear when we have completed festivals and more concerts again.”

The head of secretariat is now proposing that the government create a new recovery pool for organisers who have been hit particularly hard by the crisis.

 


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Denmark reopening ‘a day to celebrate’

Denmark’s live music business has cheered “a day to celebrate” after it became the first country in the EU to announce it is ending all coronavirus measures.

The country will no longer categorise Covid-19 as a “socially critical” illness from 5 February, with PM Mette Frederiksen telling citizens they will be able to look forward to “concerts and festivals again” this summer.

The authorities will remove restrictions from 1 February due to Denmark’s high (81%) vaccination rate and the Omicron variant appearing to be milder than previous variants. Despite a recent surge in infections, Covid-related hospitalisations remain low.

“Our focus now is to secure a financial support package for festivals and venues, so they get the support they need to rebuild”

Welcoming the news, trade body Dansk Live tells IQ its immediate goal is to secure government assistance to help rebuild the domestic sector.

“This is truly a day to celebrate,” says head of secretariat Esben Marcher. “The live industry has been through so much within the last two years, and it’s hard to believe that we have probably seen the end of this pandemic. Our focus now is to secure a financial support package for festivals and venues, so they get the support they need to rebuild after a long and hard pandemic and make live music thrive again.”

The association warns that “things won’t just go back to normal” due to restrictions being lifted.

“Audiences still hesitate going to concerts for several reasons – i.e. uncertainty about the show happening at all, worries about getting infected – and it has been difficult to find volunteers for shows and festivals,” it adds. “So our work is cut out for us.”

 


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