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Denmark’s restart team submits recommendations

Denmark’s ‘restart team’ has submitted a catalogue of recommendations on the reopening of the cultural and sports sectors to the ministry of culture for government approval.

The ten-person team, which was assembled by the government in autumn 2020, has met with more than 80 key stakeholders across the two sectors to determine how the government should allocate the 50 million DKK it previously earmarked for the restart.

The restart team has made the following recommendations for the government:

“It is crucial that we get as much momentum as possible in culture and sports under the conditions we live in right now”

The team has also made a number of recommendations that require a longer-term effort and/or funding that is outside the allocated 50m DKK.

The team – which includes Esben Marcher (Dansk Live), Signe Lopdrup (Roskilde Festival Group) and Sara Indrio (Danish Artist Association) from the music sector – has outlined the financial loss event organisers have experienced due to the pandemic, and the risks that lie ahead with the reopening.

The team has recommended the following solutions:

• Compensation schemes and other support that must ensure that organisers in culture and sports can receive financial coverage for losses during a reopening.
• Risk capital, possibly in the form of a loss guarantee or government-backed insurance for organisers in case they are forced to cancel their events.
• Ongoing compensation for those who have to wait longer to open.

Joy Mogensen, Denmark’s minister for culture, says: “It is crucial that we get as much momentum as possible in culture and sports under the conditions we live in right now.”

Dansk Live’s Marcher says: “We have gone for broad, embracing proposals that can benefit all actors, which of course means that recommendations are not necessarily directly aimed at live organisers. However, I think it is positive that the SAFE project on testing quick tests is included in recommendations, just as it is positive that there is a focus on pushing for innovation in culture and sports.”

Roskilde Festival Group’s Lopdrup, who is deputy chairman of the restart team, says: “Cultural and sports life has been hit hard by closure and restrictions. In our work, we have encountered a sector that, on the one hand, fights hard for survival and, on the other hand, does everything possible to come up with proposals for solutions and the development of formats that can pave the way for those cultures and sports experiences we all lack so much.

“Our recommendations certainly do not solve all the challenges, but I hope they can help inspire and open up new opportunities for the players and thus pave the way for the reopening of cultural and sports life, so we can meet about the community-creating experiences again.”

 


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Sweden dedicates extra 1.5bn kr to culture

Sweden’s governing parties are dedicating an extra 1.5 billion kr (€144m) to culture this year to compensate for the economic consequences caused by the pandemic and ensure the sector’s full recovery.

In addition, an extra 1bn kr will be set aside for 2021 for the restructuring and restart of cultural activities throughout the country. Details of its distribution will be revealed at a later date.

The government has also unveiled future plans to invest in cultural infrastructure – including concert halls – by increasing the cultural cooperation model by 300m kr in 2021 and by 150m kr in the following years.

The government has also unveiled future plans to invest in cultural infrastructure including concert halls

Finally, a further 80m kr will be set aside annually, from 2021, to “strengthen the conditions of cultural creators throughout the country,” which will see an increase in the number of grants and scholarships available.

Elsewhere, the government recently gave freelancers a lifeline when it announced a 3.5bn kr support package for sole traders that have been severely financially impacted during the pandemic this year, as well as an extra 1.5bn kr set aside for 2021.

Sole traders will now be able to receive compensation for 75% of their loss in turnover, provided they had a turnover of 200,000 kr the previous year.

Sweden is still operating with a 50-person limit on public gatherings, which has been in force since mid-March. However, the strict limit has forced event organisers to get creative with formats.

 


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Industry orgs: Bring back EU culture commissioner title

A collection of music industry associations have shown their support for the Bring Back Culture campaign, following the absence of the term ‘culture’ from the title of EU commissioner, Mariya Gabriel.

On 10 September, president-elect of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, presented the commission’s new structure, with eight vice presidents standing for updated work priorities. Culture falls under the gambit of Commissioner Gabriel, but is absent from her title of ‘Innovation and Youth’.

Von der Leyen takes over from Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission on 1 November, 2019.

Culture Action Europe (CAE), a network of cultural organisations, penned an open letter to the president of the European Commission asking for the insertion of the term ‘culture’ into the title. The letter was signed by bodies including the British Council, the European Composer and Songwriter Alliance, the European Choral Association, the European Concert Hall Organisation and Opera Europa,

The signatories are concerned that culture will not “remain at the appropriate level of recognition” due to the title change.

“We call upon the president of the European Commission to reinforce the role of culture by spelling out ‘culture’ in the title of the commissioner”

European live industry body Pearle*, the European Music Council (EMC) and venue network Live DMA are among live music-related organisations to lend their support to the CAE campaign.

“Pearle* looks forward to discussing Commissioner-designate Mariya Gabriel’s priorities on culture and the new Creative Europe programme,” reads a statement from the organisation. “However, we regret that culture is not literally mentioned in her portfolio’s title.

“This sets an unwelcome precedent since culture has been included in the European Treaty in 1991.”

The EMC and Live DMA similarly express concerns, saying “we call upon the president of the European Commission to reinforce the role of culture for the development of the European Union by spelling out ‘culture’ in the title of the commissioner.”

All three organisations had previously urged politicians to put live music at the core of EU policy, prior to the European Parliament elections in May.

The CAE online petition had received 1,885 signatures at press time.

 


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Macron dedicates €225m to French cultural sector

French president Emmanuel Macron has pledged to create a €225 million public fund to benefit creative companies in the country, as he warns against growing US and Chinese dominance in the sector.

Macron announced the fund to a crowd of 130 cultural industry executives at the Elysée Palace. The funding was one of the recommendations made in a report concerning the private financing of film and audiovisual production in France by film producer Dominique Boutonnat.

The fund will be operated by the Public Investment Bank (banque publique d’investissement).

The French president also warned the executives against the dominance of US companies such as Netflix, Disney and Apple, as well as emerging Chinese competitors.

“I truly believe that if we do not organise ourselves, the battle is lost,” stated Macron at the Elysée Palace meeting, highlighting the need for collective action to combat US and Chinese tech giants.

“I truly believe that if we do not organise ourselves, the battle is lost”

A collective action plan will be outlined by the French Ministry of Culture in cooperation with the cultural industry sector by the end of the year.

This is the second time this month that the French president has called upon the EU to pool resources in the name of culture. In the aftermath of the devastating fire at Notre Dame cathedral on 15 April, Macron called for collective action to safeguard historical sites and protect “European heritage”.

US cultural sector dominance has been criticised by French politicians in the past. In 2017, former French culture minister Jack Lang denounced Live Nation’s inaugural Lollapalooza Paris festival as an “invasion of the musical life of France by American multinationals”.

The Paris edition of Lollapalooza returns for its third year in July, featuring headline performances from Twenty One Pilots and the Strokes.

 


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.art, TLD for “world’s creative community”, launches

With seemingly no end in sight to the dispute over the ownership of .music, London-based UK Creative Ideas (UKCI) has launched an an alternative domain name for the arts and cultural sector: .art.

Describes as a top-level domain (TLD) for the “world’s creative community in all its diverse forms”, .art’s early adopters largely consist of art galleries and museums, including Paris’s Centre Pompidou, Tate in London and the Guggenheim Museum in New York, although UKCI says .art “goes way beyond the visual arts to embrace performance, decorative arts, applied arts, literature, film, music, education, collectables, and could even take in cookery and sport”.

“Our mission is to preserve the cultural legacy of the global art world,” says .art founder Ulvi Kasimov. “We are honoured that so many respected institutions from all over the world share our vision and conviction that .art will transform the arts community’s relationship with the internet and help protect their brand’s heritage online.”

.art domain names will be available to register from February 2017.

Similar TLDs include Accent Media’s .tickets and Rightside’s .band.

 


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British acts take centre stage at Rio Olympics

London artists represented the UK’s creative industries at the Olympics in Rio on Sunday, with performances from grime acts Nadia Rose (pictured), Elf kid and Logan Sama, and electronic duo Chase & Status.

Taking place on Sunday, 14 August, a London Soundtrack showcase saw the artists play live to celebrate the city’s culture, organised by the Major of London, Sadiq Khan, and curated by British Underground.

Says Khan: “I hope Elf Kid, Nadia and Logan will inspire others to make the best of what our great city has to offer and encourage the world to invest in London’s thriving cultural and creative industries.

“British Underground have been doing an excellent job exporting British music to important international showcases across the world for the last 15 years and this event in Rio demonstrates very clearly that London is open for business.”

The gig took place at British House – the official residence of Britain during the Rio Olympics.

“British Underground have been doing an excellent job exporting British music to important international showcases across the world for the last 15 years and this event in Rio demonstrates very clearly that London is open for business,” Khan says.

Elsewhere, 23 songs published by Universal Music Publishing Group have featured, or are set to feature, during the opening and closing ceremonies.

On Monday, the famed Jobim/Moraes standard The Girl From Ipanema (Garota De Ipanema) was streamed more than 40,000 times after the song soundtracked model Gisele Bundchen’s opening catwalk on Friday, when UMPG Brazil artist and songwriter Anitta also performed.

Norwegian musician Kygo will play his early 2016 single Carry Me with guest vocalist Julia Michaels during the closing ceremony on 21 August.

The show will start at 8pm BRT at the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, and is part of the new Olympic Channel launch, which will be available worldwide via a mobile app and online.

“As one of the hottest music acts in the world, Kygo’s music speaks to new generations of Olympic fans,” says Mark Parkman, General Manager of the Olympic Channel.

“His performance is sure to electrify viewers around the world on Sunday night as we prepare to launch the Olympic Channel.

“Kygo and his music will be an important element of the Olympic Channel where fans will be able to continue their excitement of Rio and the Olympic Games all year long.”

War of words over more concerts on Clapham Common

Two London councils are at war over plans to hold more concerts and large-scale live events on Clapham Common.

Although the 220-acre park is managed and maintained solely by Lambeth Council, half of it lies in neighbouring Wandsworth, and the latter council has voiced “serious concerns” over a new events strategy by Lambeth that paves the way for the borough to hold up to eight shows a year on Clapham Common, as well as eight each in four other ‘event zones’ (Streatham, North Lambeth, Brixton and Norwood).

The council has also greenlit an increase in maximum sound levels on the common and three other parks. The new music noise level (MNL) will be 75dB L(A), with a maximum low-frequency music noise level (LFMNL) of 90 dB L(C).

Wandsworth Council’s environment spokesman, Councillor Jonathan Cook, has criticised Lambeth for “burying” the recommendations “some 300 pages into a 520-page” report and says more “noisy music festivals and other loud events” will negatively affect those living near the common.

“Instead of trying to conceal the level of opposition that exists to these proposals and trying to sneak them through without the public’s knowledge, Lambeth actually needs to sit down and engage much more closely with residents who live near the common,” says Cllr Cook.

Wandsworth councillor Jonathan Cook says more “noisy music festivals and other loud events” will negatively affect those living near the common

“It would simply not be acceptable for changes as drastic as these to be made to Clapham Common without much greater and proper consultation with those most directly affected by any relaxation in the noise rules.”

However, a spokesman for Lambeth Council says the events plan was drawn up after “extensive consultation”, including with Wandsworth, “who were consulted as part of the Culture 2020 consultation and were engaged as part of the separate noise consultation in February this year – and responded”.

“It’s also been on the [public] forward plan since November last year, so to claim these proposals have ‘just emerged’ is absurd,” she tells the Evening Standard, adding that “the recommendations are not ‘buried’: the cabinet report is 19 pages, not 520 pages as the press release says, and the noise limit will be increased only from 70dB to 75Db, and for a maximum of eight days per year”.

Clapham Common is currently home to ’80s festival Let’s Rock London, held last weekend, and Lock N Load Events’ House of Common and South West Four in August. It was also the home of Live Nation’s apparently defunct Calling Festival, previously held in Hyde Park.

 


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38% of UK concertgoers are music tourists

Over one in three attendees at live music events in Britain last year were music tourists – an increase of 16% on 2014.

A total of 10.4 million music tourists attended UK festivals and concerts in 2015, of which 767,000 were from overseas, reveals UK Music’s Wish You Were Here 2016 report, released today. Foreign concertgoers bought £38m worth of tickets and spent an average of £852 each (up 13% on 2014).

The report also revealed that music tourists spent a total of £3.7 billion in 2015, with 39,034 full-time jobs reliant on the sector.

It was also strong year for British live music in general, with 3.7m people attending a festival and 24m at least one concert (although last year’s WYWH report focused solely on music tourism, so there are no comparable data for the market as a whole).

“This is a fantastic achievement and a great testament to both our live music industry and the musical talent it supports”

“This is a fantastic achievement and a great testament to both our live music industry and the musical talent it supports,” says UK culture secretary John Whittingdale OBE, who penned the foreword to the report. “This is no surprise given British artists account for just over one in seven albums purchased by fans around the globe.”

The report also contains in-depth analyses of regional markets around the UK. In London there were 3.2m music tourists (of a total attendance of 8.4m) as the capital’s grassroots venues begin to rebound following years of decline.

A launch event for Wish You Were Here 2016 will take place at the House of Commons on Wednesday (15 June).

 


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CAA launches new division

Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has launched a new division, CAA Culinary, to represent its growing roster of celebrity chefs and food personalities.

CAA’s booking agents represent some of the world’s most high-profile touring artists, including Beyoncé, Bruce Sprinsgteen, AC/DC, Radiohead and new signing Ed Sheeran, and the Beverly Hills-headquartered company also has film, television and sports divisions.

CAA Culinary will be led by Andrew Chason, a co-founder of Vector Eats, which represents a number of culinary celebrities.

“Food culture is as prominent in the zeitgeist as entertainment, fashion or sports”

“CAA is the gold standard in entertainment and sports, and I couldn’t be more excited to join the team,” said Chason (pictured). “From the surge in popularity of high-profile chefs and food-based television to the explosion of culinary festivals around the world, food culture is as prominent in the zeitgeist as entertainment, fashion or sports. As food and chefs increasingly become a fundamental part of pop culture and consumers place a higher value on experiences, rather than material goods, we see tremendous growth opportunities in this area of business.”

CAA already represents a number of prominent food personalities, including Gordon Ramsay, Roy Choi, Duff Goldman and Christina Tosi, and Chason will bring all his Vector Eats clients with him, including Aarón Sánchez, John Besh, Amanda Freitag, Andrew Carmellini, Alon Shaya, Alex Thomopoulos and Jonathan Waxman.

In March CAA hired corporate strategy specialist Matteo Perale to lead its “aggressive growth and diversification” efforts worldwide.