fbpx

PROFILE

MY SUBSCRIPTION

LOGOUT

x

The latest industry news to your inbox.

    

I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

ATL acquires Finland’s Till Dawn They Count

Till Dawn They Count, the Finnish artist management company which represents symphonic metal icons Nightwish, has joined Nordic live entertainment group All Things Live.

Till Dawn They Count joins Weekend Festival to become the second Finnish member of All Things Live (ATL), a network of mainly Scandinavian live music businesses backed by private-equity firm Waterland. It is also the first management company to join the group.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed, though ATL notes that “the acquisition does not entail changes for artists, partners, customers or employees, as proximity and familiarity is a key area of focus for the All Things Live partnership”.

In addition to Nightwish, Till Dawn They Count (TDTC) looks after leading Finnish metal stars, including Sonata Arctica, Beast in Black and Marko Hietala.

“I am very excited about the prospect of Till Dawn They Count becoming a member of the All Things Live family, who shares our ambition to help realise the vision and potential of both established and emerging artists,” says Toni Peiju, who founded TDTC with Ewo Pohjola in 2014.

“We see great prospects in the dedicated Till Dawn They Count team … and the expansion into artist management

“We maintain our independence and strong dedication to our bands, with the All Things Live partnership broadening our network and providing us with a strong and supporting organisation that further strengthens our ability to help develop established and emerging artists alike. Meanwhile, we are looking forward to contributing to the partnership with our knowhow and network.”

“We are very excited about Till Dawn They Count joining the All Things Live partnership, as we now establish a strong entry into the artist management activities of live entertainment,” says Kim Worsøe, CEO of All Things Live.

“We see great prospects in the dedicated Till Dawn They Count team, the many talented artists and the expansion into artist management. Together we establish an even stronger platform and ability to grow artists.”

In addition to Weekend Festival and TDTC, All Things Live’s other businesses include ICO Concerts and ICO Management & Touring (Denmark), Friction, Atomic Soul Booking and Stand Up Norge (Norway), and Maloney Concerts, Monkfish, Big Slap and ROA (Sweden). It also recently made its first investment outside the Nordic countries, in Belgian agency Busker.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Norway’s festival sector compensated NOK 120m+

Live Nation Norway, All Things Live and Tons of Rock will benefit from the latest round of compensation from the Norwegian government’s scheme for organisers and subcontractors in the cultural sector.

The scheme, funded by the ministry of culture and distributed by Norway’s cultural council (Kulturradet), has so far paid out approximately NOK 1.4bn to more than 2,000 applicants across various compensation schemes for 2020.

For the latest tranche, which covers the period of May to August 2020, the cultural council is distributing more than NOK 120m (€11.7m) to some of the biggest players in Norway’s festival sector.

Live Nation Norway has been granted NOK 24.7m as an organiser – just under the NOK 25m it applied for.

Nordic live entertainment powerhouse All Things Live will receive NOK 36.4m – two million less than they applied for – for around 20 concerts that had to be cancelled in 2020.

While, Live Nation-owned Oslo festival Tons of Rock will benefit from NOK 36.1m, the full amount applied for by the organisers.

Other successful applicants include Kristiansand beach festival, Palmesus (NOK 27.1m); organiser of Ålesund Live, Summer party at Giske and Jugendfest, Momentium Live (NOK 8.4m); and Fredrikstad-based all-ages festival, Idyll (NOK 8.7m).

“The largest players in the sector are also large employers and an important part of the cultural sector’s business chain”

“The applications for the compensation schemes show us both how hard the cultural sector has been affected, and how diverse the Norwegian cultural economy is,” says Kristin Danielsen, director of the cultural council.

“The largest players in the sector are also large employers and an important part of the cultural sector’s business chain. Therefore, I would have liked to have had the application process completed earlier.

“At the same time, it has been important for us to process the applications thoroughly. These are community funds, and it is our responsibility to manage them in the best possible way.”

More than 1,500 applications were received for the compensation scheme for the period May-August and more than 1,200 applicants received their decisions in the early autumn of 2020, with a few more applicants yet to be notified.

The Cultural Council is now processing applications for the scheme that applies to September, and the period of October–December has an application deadline of 1 March.

The scheme is designed to compensate organisers and subcontractors that were financially impacted by the Norwegian government’s ban on live events which was extended into late 2020, causing the cancellation of the country’s biggest festivals.

Norway’s ministry of culture last week announced a NOK 350 million financial safety net will allow festival organisers plan for July and August 2021 without the financial risk posed by a potential Covid outbreak.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Belgium’s Busker Artist Agency joins All Things Live

Independent Belgian booking agency Busker Artist Agency has joined All Things Live, becoming the private equity-backed live entertainment group’s first member outside the Nordic countries.

The addition of Busker, whose acts played some 700 Belgian shows in 2019, to the All Things Live network gives the company “a solid foothold in the Belgian market, which is in many ways comparable to the Nordic markets that we know so well,” says All Things Live CEO Kim Worsøe. “We see great prospects in the dedicated Busker team, the many talented artists and the expansion into Belgium, and we are full of confidence as we look ahead to 2021.”

Busker Artist Agency’s 60-artist roster includes the likes of Selah Sue, Coely, Eefje de Visser, Stuff, Zwangere Guy, Tourist LeMC and Gabriel Rios.

In common with other All Things Live companies, which are mainly promoters, Halle-based Busker is also expanding its activities beyond booking, adding Marcus Deblaere as senior promoter and head of festivals. Deblaere brings experience as a concert promoter for Ancienne Belgique (2,000-cap.) in Brussels and Twix (450-cap.) in Antwerp, as well as creative manager for Musickness.

He joins Busker CEO Werner Dewachter, who founded the agency in 2002, as well two other new recruits, senior agents Bjorn Nuyens and Willem Vandesande.

“This exciting move allows us to take our business to the next level after two decades”

“The combination of Busker Artist Agency and All Things Live entails great opportunities,” says Deblaere. “In close collaboration with Werner and our new Nordic colleagues, we will be able to set up creative and challenging concerts, festivals and live events, support our beloved Belgian artists and scene, and export some of the great Belgian successes to the interesting Nordic and European markets.”

“I am very pleased that Busker will become a member of the All Things Live family, as this exciting move allows us to take our business to the next level after two decades and thousands of amazing live experiences in Belgium,” adds Dewachter.

“All Things Live will broaden our network and support our growth, and we will strengthen our position amongst Belgian artists as well.”

The acquisition of Busker Artist Agency follows the establishment of a local booking operation in Denmark earlier this month.

Founded by Waterland Private Equity in 2018, All Things Live’s other businesses include ICO Concerts and ICO Management & Touring (Denmark), Friction, Atomic Soul Booking and Stand Up Norge (Norway), Maloney Concerts, Monkfish, Big Slap and ROA (Sweden) and Weekend Festival (Finland).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

All Things Live launches booking department in Denmark

Leading Nordic live entertainment company All Things Live is strengthening its position in Denmark with a new local booking department in Copenhagen.

In December it was announced that former Copenhagen Music agent Morten Hundahl will spearhead the new department and today All Things Live reveal that he is joined by John Blicher Madsen, who will work as an agent in the booking team.

Madsen has previously worked at 3rd Tsunami Agency and Musicall Booking, and will be bringing a handful of acts to the existing Danish roster.

The Danish roster now includes artists such as Morten, Emil Stabil (pictured), Greta, De Danske Hyrder, ORM, Pattesutter, Johnson and Nabiha.

“We have great ambitions for our Danish roster, and will proceed our expansion of this with modesty and determination”

“We are very pleased that Morten and John have joined the team,” says CEO Pernille Møller Pedersen. “Both of them bring a lot of experience, innovation and positive energy to the table, which I’m convinced will strengthen and expand our Danish music department. In spite of the current Covid-19 situation, we keep reinforcing All Things Live Denmark.”

Morten Hundahl, new head of the Danish music department, adds: “We have great ambitions for our Danish roster, and will proceed our expansion of this with modesty and determination. I’m convinced that John is the perfect match. With brighter days ahead on the other side, we look forward to announcing a lot of tours and create some unforgettable live experiences.”

In 2020, All Things Live expanded its comedy department and announced the acquisition of the event company Monkfish.

Founded in 2018, the entertainment company – backed by private-equity firm Waterland – also includes ICO Concerts and ICO Management and Touring (Denmark), Friction and Atomic Soul Booking (Norway), Maloney Concerts, Big Slap festival (Sweden) and Weekend Festival (Finland).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

All Things Live acquires comedy agency ROA

Leading Nordic live entertainment company All Things Live has acquired ROA, a Swedish booking agency and management company for comedians, speakers, actors, screenwriters and authors.

Stockholm-based ROA becomes part of All Things Live’s comedy business, which also includes Norway’s Stand Up Norge and Sweden’s Blixten & Co. All ROA employees will remain in their jobs following the acquisition, terms of which were not disclosed.

“I am very pleased that we finally become part of All Things Live,” says Sabina Donoukará, the agency’s CEO. “It is a step in the right direction for ROA as a company, for our clients and our staff. Having the opportunity to realise our full potential feels good.

“This is the ultimate proof of the fantastic job our staff and us have done over the years. I am excited and looking forward to what is to come.”

“We are pleased and proud to welcome ROA and their many gifted comedians to the All Things Live family”

“We have owned this company for 13 years, and it is now time for us to step down as coowners and just be comedians,” says Johan Glans, a comedian who co-founded ROA in 2007 alongside David Batra, Thomas Järvheden, Özz Nûjen, Hasse Brontén and Måns Möller. “We are handing over the reins to people who can really make ROA reach its full potential. And the close collaboration with our Nordic neighbours will, of course, be extra exciting.”

Adds Henrik Berndtson of All Things Live Sweden: “We are pleased and proud to welcome ROA and their many gifted comedians to the All Things Live family. We are looking forward to strengthening our common platform in Sweden and exchanging talent, productions and experience across the other Nordic countries.”

Founded in 2018, All Things Live – backed by private-equity firm Waterland – also includes ICO Concerts and ICO Management and Touring (Denmark), Friction and Atomic Soul Booking (Norway), Maloney Concerts, Monkfish and Big Slap festival (Sweden) and Weekend Festival (Finland).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

All Things Live joins forces with Monkfish event agency

Nordic live entertainment powerhouse All Things Live is partnering with one of Denmark’s leading event agencies, Monkfish.

The Danish company, founded in 2007 by Rikke Salling, and its network of cooperation partners organises and executes 25-35 events annually which have involved artists including Jan Gintberg, Hella Joof, Nikolaj Lie Kaas, Lukas Graham (pictured) and The Minds of 99.

Monkfish will retain the company’s independence while working in close co-operation with All Things Live, which has a presence in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland.

All Things Live says the acquisition does not entail changes for Monkfish’s customers, partners or employees as ‘market proximity is a key focus area for the partnership’. Both parties have declined to comment on the price or additional details of the transaction.

“I am pleased that our fantastic team at Monkfish will now become part of the All Things Live family and have even better opportunities of creating the best experiences for existing and new customers. We maintain our independence and the uncompromising focus on creativity and thoroughness that has always set Monkfish apart,” says Rikke Salling, founder and CEO of Monkfish.

“Monkfish creates unique experiences for some of the largest Danish corporate customers and has a strong market position”

“The new partnership offers strong organisational support and a good foundation for strengthening Monkfish’s profile towards existing and new customers. At the same time, we are looking forward to contributing to the All Things Live community with our knowhow and network.”

Kim Worsøe, CEO of All Things Live Group, says: “Monkfish creates unique experiences for some of the largest corporate customers in Denmark and has established a strong market position, which we are looking forward to developing with Rikke and her team in cooperation with the other members of the All Things Live partnership. Together, we will have an even stronger platform for creating more fantastic events and experiences for our customers.”

All Things Live was established by six Scandinavian companies in early 2019, with a number of additional live entertainment companies joining later including Sweden’s Big Slap and Stand Up Norge.

The Nordic company represents around 250 local artists, promotes and produces more than 5,000 events with more than 1.5 million tickets sold annually, and has entered into a number of partnerships with large corporate clients.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Positive signs but a long way to go, say Nordic promoters

Live music was allowed to return to Norway earlier this month, but event organisers in the country – as well as those in neighbouring Sweden, which has not seen a blanket ban on shows – say the return to business for the live industry is still some way off.

After almost two months of silence, concerts of up to 50 people were permitted to take place in Norway from 7 May, providing a one-metre space is kept between attendees, with capacity limits set to increase to 200 people by mid-June if all goes well and, possibly, to 500 by September

“It’s great to see that some concerts can take place again,” says Anders Tangen of Norwegian live music association Norske Konsertarrangører (NKA), “but to make it very clear – it’s not something that can keep our industry economically afloat.”

In a similar vein to responses from those in the Spanish music industry when reopening plans were unveiled, promoters in Norway suggest that initial restrictions are not viable for live events.

“A capacity of 50 works for private events like weddings and anniversaries, but I don’t see a concert boom returning with these restrictions,” Tonje Kaada, CEO of Norway’s Øya Festival tells IQ. “Maybe if the limit increases to 200 like they say it may from 15 June, but I think most promoters need a 500 limit before finding it financially healthy to restart their businesses.”

“It’s great to see that some concerts can take place again, but it’s not something that can keep our industry economically afloat”

Øya was among major festivals in Norway to cancel its 2020 edition following the extension of the government’s large-scale event ban to 1 September. Although having to cancel is “every festival organiser’s nightmare”, Kaada states it was helpful to be able to do so “in such controlled circumstances”, with time to discuss with other organisers and the wider industry.

“It’s been an incredibly tough time for our whole eco system, but at least we’re in the same boat and I really feel that everyone is doing what they can to support each other.”

Mark Vaughan from All Things Live Norway agrees that there is “no financial reward for anyone” putting on an event under current restrictions. However, the reopening, albeit slight, does “give people a chance to work in many different sectors of the business”, says Vaughan, adding that putting on shows, even under the restrictions, is “a positive step for everyone”.

In addition to capacity limits, the need to maintain social distancing at events provides more problems for promoters. FKP Scorpio Norway head promoter Stian Pride says the one-metre distancing guideline means it is “very difficult to make [shows] work”.

“The economic margins for venues and festivals were tight before the crisis, and this makes it even worse”

In order to facilitate easier and safer reopening, the NKA has developed guidelines for venues and organisers on how to meet regulations from the health authorities. “It’s a lot to consider and implement,” says Tangen, “but at the same time there is of course eagerness to open up and get back to come sort of normality.

“The economic margins for venues and festivals were tight before the crisis, and this makes it even worse.”

The situation in Norway is much the same as that in neighbouring Sweden which, unlike its western European counterparts, has yet to impose a full lockdown, keeping bars, restaurants and shops open and allowing events of up to 50 people.

However, the country’s live industry is facing the same issues as most others. “No concerts at all are taking place,” Edward Janson of Swedish promoter Triffid and Danger tells IQ. “We were supposed to promote 42 concerts from mid-March to late May and all of these have either been cancelled or postponed.” Janson adds that he is “more and more sceptical” as to whether shows rescheduled to autumn will be able to go ahead.

Indeed, unlike in many other countries, no end-date for restrictions or plan for resuming normal business has been given in Sweden, making it difficult for promoters to plan for the future, says Joppe Pihlgren of Swedish live music organisation Svensk Live.

“Our focus is to help our members to survive this spring and summer.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

All Things Live acquires Sweden’s Big Slap

Pan-Nordic live entertainment company All Things Live has upped its presence in Sweden, acquiring electronic dance music festival Big Slap.

Founded in 2013, Big Slap (15,000-cap.) takes place each year in Tallriken park, Malmö. This year’s event features a live-focused day on Friday 31 July, with acts including Black Eyed Peas, Bad Bunny, Rita Ora, Wizkid and Stefflon Don, and an EDM day on 1 August that sees performances from Dimitri Vegas and Like Mike,Timmy Trumpet, Vini Vici and Bob Sinclair.

Big Slap founders have collaborated with the Swedish and Danish entities of All Things Live for years and will join the team to run the festival, as well as other events in southern Sweden.

“We know the All Things Live team very well and share the ambition of bringing even more great artists and shows to the Nordics,” comments Big Slap co-founder Ali Eftekhari.

“We are excited to join forces with our colleagues in All Things Live as we aim to expand the footprint in southern Sweden by drawing on the partnership’s strong international reach, exceptional network among world class artists, and its financial strength.”

“We are excited to join forces with our colleagues in All Things Live as we aim to expand the footprint in southern Sweden”

Backed by Dutch private-equity firm Waterland, All Things Live was borne out of the merging of six leading Scandinavian promoters and agencies – ICO Concerts and ICO Management and Touring (Denmark), Maloney Concerts and Blixten & Co (Sweden) and Friction and Atomic Soul Booking (Norway) – since adding Finland’s Weekend Festival and Norway’s Stand Up Norge to the portfolio.

“Big Slap Festival is an amazing addition to the All Things Live family, and our teams in Denmark and Sweden look forward to developing their existing relations and drive further growth in the combined business,” says Kim Worsøe, CEO of All Things Live Group.

“The expansion will benefit artists, audiences, suppliers and our partners as we improve our ability to serve them and explore the opportunities across the Nordic markets.”

All Things Live has more than 100 employees, represents more than 200 artists and promotes more than 4,000 events a year across Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Comedy promoter Stand Up Norge joins All Things Live

Pan-Nordic live music group All Things Live has acquired Stand Up Norge, Norway’s biggest comedy promoter.

Founded in 1997 by Elina Krantz, Stand Up Norge is a full-service entertainment company which represents 67 comedians (17 permanent and 50 affiliated) and organises nearly 2,000 stand-up shows a year, for an expected 2019 turnover of 200 million krone (€20m).

Stand Up also owns Latter in Oslo, Norway’s biggest comedy club.

With the acquisition, for an undisclosed sum, All Things Live says it aims to export successful Norwegian comedians to the other Nordic countries.

“We have achieved a lot in Norway, and we now turn to the Nordics to delight our neighbours as well,” says Krantz (pictured), who joins All Things Live as a partner and co-owner.

“We have achieved a lot in Norway, and we now turn to the Nordics to delight our neighbours as well”

“We look forward to working with our colleagues in All Things Live aiming to attract even more international stand up stars to Norway.”

All Things Live, backed by private-equity firm Waterland, was formed in December 2018, and includes ICO Concerts and ICO Management and Touring (Denmark), Friction and Atomic Soul Booking (Norway), Blixten & Co and Maloney Concerts (Sweden), and Weekend Festival (Finland).

The combined company has 85 employees, represents over 150 artists and produces more than 3,000 events annually.

“Stand Up Norge is a well-run company with many talented comedians and great prospects in Norway and beyond,” says Kim Worsøe, CEO of All Things Live. “We look forward to strengthening our position in Norway and introducing talents, texts and experiences from Norway in the other Nordic countries.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Odd Inge Sneve joins All Things Live Norway

Odd Inge Sneve, a 16-year veteran of Live Nation Norway, has joined All Things Live as a senior promoter in its Oslo office, effective today (2 December).

Sneve (pictured), who joined Live Nation in its production department and advanced to national promoter, brings hundreds of shows’ worth of experience to All Things Live, which launched this time last year.

All Things Live, backed by private-equity firm Waterland, was formed in December 2018, combining ICO Concerts and ICO Management and Touring (Denmark), Friction and Atomic Soul Booking (Norway), and Blixten & Co and Maloney Concerts (Sweden), and has since added Weekend Festival (Finland). The combined company has an annual revenue of around €85 million and approximately 70 employees in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland.

“Odd is one of the best guys in the business. But in addition to being great guy, he is a great promoter and a proper music person,” comments All Things Live head promoter Mark Vaughan. “He’s been doing this a long time and knows every facet of the promoting business. We think he and the fantastic range of acts he works with will be a perfect fit at All Things Live.”

“Live Nation has been a great home for a number of years, but it’s time for a new challenge”

Adds Sneve: “Live Nation has been a great home for a number of years, but it’s time for a new challenge. Watching what Peer [Osmuundsvaag] and Mark have been able to achieve in the last few years, firstly as Atomic Soul and now All Things Live, is very impressive, and I’m excited to join them and see how we can all take things even further together.”

All Things Live promotes 3,000 shows a year across the Nordic countries. Next year, its Oslo office will stage concerts for acts including Taylor Swift, Rammstein, Celine Dion, Green Day and Nick Cave.

In June 2018, All Things Live Norway/Atomic Soul promoted the record-breaking Eminem show in Oslo, where he performed to a massive 55,000 people at Oslo Sommertid.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.