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Adele confirms rescheduled Vegas residency

Adele has announced the rescheduled dates for her long-awaited Weekends With Adele residency in Las Vegas.

The Live Nation-promoted run was originally due to kick off in January, only for it to be postponed just 24 hours before opening night.

“It’s been impossible to finish the show,” explained the star on Instagram. “I can’t give you what I have right now and I’m gutted.

“I’m sorry, it’s last minute. I’m so upset and I’m really embarrassed and I’m so sorry to everyone that’s travelled again.”

It has now been confirmed, however, that the 24 rescheduled concerts – plus eight new shows – will now take place at The Colosseum (cap. 4,300) at Caesars Palace from 18 November 2022 to 25 March 2023.

“Words can’t explain how ecstatic I am to finally be able to announce these rescheduled shows”

“Words can’t explain how ecstatic I am to finally be able to announce these rescheduled shows,” Adele tells fans on social media. “I truly was heartbroken to have to cancel them. But after what feels like an eternity of figuring out logistics for the show that I really want to deliver, and knowing it can happen, I’m more excited than ever!

“Now I know for some of you it was a horrible decision on my part, and I will always be sorry for that, but I promise you it was the right one. To be with you in such an intimate space every week has been what I’ve most been looking forward to and I’m going to give you the absolute best of me. Thank you for your patience, I love you x Adele.”

Tickets for the original dates were priced from US$85 to $685. A select number of tickets will be available across all 32 performances, with priority given to fans who held tickets for the original show dates or had previously registered and been waitlisted for the Weekends With Adele Verified Fan Presale.

The residency will see Adele follow in the footsteps of legends such as Celine Dion, Elton John, Madonna, Mariah Carey and Rod Stewart in performing at the famous Colosseum theatre.

The 34-year-old singer, who is represented by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer at WME, returned to the stage earlier this month for two sold-out nights at AEG’s BST Hyde Park concert series in London.

Adele’s 25 Tour was the fifth highest-grossing tour of 2016 according to Pollstar, grossing $167.7 million from 107 shows.


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BST’s Jim King talks Adele, live biz resurgence

AEG’s Jim King has hailed Adele as “the biggest act on the planet” ahead of the singer’s exclusive two-night stand at BST Hyde Park this weekend.

Demand for the 65,000-cap London shows was enormous, with tickets selling out within minutes of going on sale last October.

The 1-2 July double-header will be the star’s first concerts proper since 2017, when her scheduled four-night run at Wembley Stadium was cut short due to damaged vocal cords. Her planned Weekends With Adele Las Vegas residency was postponed in January – just 24 hours before its opening night – with rescheduled dates still to be announced.

“She’s the biggest act on the planet. And for us to be able to have two concerts with her here is such a highlight for everybody involved,” King, AEG’s CEO of European festivals, tells IQ. “We couldn’t be more thankful that she decided to come and play here. We know they’re so excited about it.

“Fans are going to see the biggest act in the world perform two of the best concerts anyone’s going to see this year”

Adele, whose 2016 Adele Live tour grossed $167.7 million across 107 shows, is represented by WME agents Lucy Dickins internationally and Kirk Sommer in North America.

“The conversations that we’ve been having with her team all the way through this have been unbelievably positive,” adds King. “They are a great team to work with – we know them very well from days gone by. Fans are going to see the biggest act in the world perform two of the best concerts that anyone’s going to see this year. It’s very exciting.”

This year’s BST hosted headliners Elton John, the Rolling Stones and Eagles last weekend, with Adele and a second date with the Stones (3 June) following over the next three days. Concerts by Pearl Jam (8–9 July) and Duran Duran (10 July) bring the 2022 American Express-sponsored series to a close.

But despite expanding the BST programme from six concerts to nine, AEG pressed pause on pre-pandemic plans for new events in favour of rejuvenating existing festivals. King – who previously warned the live industry against oversupplying the market – feels the promoter’s “cautious” approach since returning from Covid-19 has been vindicated.

“The concerns that we had at the top end of the year still apply now”

“I think we’re going to continue to have an amazing year, but based on the fact that we were relatively cautious,” he says. “It sounds a bit crazy to say that with nine sold-out Hyde Park concerts, but it’s nine – we’re not chasing 99. So we have chosen to be fairly modest in our output.

“The concerns that we had at the top end of the year – that rescheduled shows from 2020 and 2021 were being rescheduled into ’22, on top of those shows that were coming into the marketplace in 2022 – still apply now.

“What we saw, and what we still see, is the indoor touring cycle extending quite deeply into the summer because of venue availability, and thus you have festivals competing with headline tours. There’s only so much money that people have to buy tickets, so I think that concern is very real and our response to it – which was being cautious in the number of shows that we did – was the right thing to do.”

“The backbone of the industry is the supply chain and the staff. They’re the people who make this happen”

King also reflects on how the touring business has changed compared to pre-March 2020 times.

“From an operational perspective, it’s largely the same, albeit there are well documented challenges in the supply chain – labour resourcing, etc, has been particularly difficult,” he says. “We have an industry now which has picked itself back up again, but there are a lot of faces who are no longer with us. A lot of experience left the industry and that is one of the greatest challenges we have needed to bounce back from.

“How do we quickly and aggressively drive that experience back into what we have? Because the backbone of the industry is the supply chain and the staff. They’re the people who make this happen. And the ability to make decisions and, more importantly, make the right ones is what makes the UK industry the leading one in the world, in my opinion.”

He adds: “We’re also dealing with the impact of a wider economy issue of the cost of living crisis, which is ongoing and will be with us for some time, no doubt. But we’ve been here before, we’ve been in challenging economy situations where money’s tight and we have to react accordingly. We have to drive value and quality into the market so that when fans buy tickets, they feel that their experience was unbelievable value and they want to remain with us.”

Read part one of our interview with King here.

 


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Adele claims BRIT Awards hat-trick

It was a good night for WME clients at the BRIT Awards, with triumphs for Dua Lipa, Olivia Rodrigo, Bruno Mars and Dave, and a hat-trick of honours for Adele.

Adele, who is repped by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer on the touring circuit, took Song of the Year and Album of the Year for Easy On Me and 30, respectively, and was also crowned the inaugural Artist of the Year at last night’s (8 February) ceremony at The O2 in London. The gender-neutral award was introduced following the decision to scrap the male and female categories.

“I understand why the name of this award has changed but I really love being a woman and being a female artist,” said the singer. “I’m really proud of us.”

Elsewhere, Dua Lipa picked up the prize for Best Pop/R&B – one of four new genre awards – Dave took the Hip-Hop/Grime/Rap gong and Olivia Rodrigo’s Good 4 U was named International Song of the Year, while Mars claimed Best International Group with Anderson .Paak for their superduo, Silk Sonic.

US star Doja Cat withdrew from the event due to Covid cases within her crew

Paak is represented by ICM Partners/Primary Talent International outside North America. ICM/Primary acts also won out in the Best New Artist (Little Simz) and Group (Wolf Alice) categories.

Other victors included Ed Sheeran (Songwriter of the Year), who is represented by One Fiinix Live, Paradigm’s Billie Eilish (International Artist) and CAA’s Sam Fender (Alternative/Rock) and Becky Hill (Dance).

With US star Doja Cat withdrawing from the event a week before it took place due to Covid cases within her crew, the line-up for the UK music industry’s biggest night was comprised entirely of domestic acts. Kicking off with a surprise collaboration between Ed Sheeran and Bring Me The Horizon, performers also included Adele, Anne-Marie/KSI/Digital Farm Animals, Dave, Rising Star winner Holly Humberstone, Liam Gallagher, Little Simz and Sam Fender.

The full list of winners was as follows:

Song of the Year – Adele, Easy On Me

International Song of the Year – Olivia Rodrigo, Good 4 U

Pop/R&B Act – Dua Lipa

Alternative/Rock Act – Sam Fender

Dance Act – Becky Hill

Group – Wolf Alice

International Artist of the Year – Billie Eilish

Best New Artist – Little Simz

Hip Hop/Grime/Rap Act – Dave

International Group – Silk Sonic

Artist of the Year – Adele

Songwriter of the Year – Ed Sheeran

Mastercard Album of the Year – Adele, 30

Rising Star – Holly Humberstone

Producer of the Year – Inflo

 


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Lady Gaga announces new Las Vegas residency

Grammy-award winning artist Lady Gaga will return to Dolby Live at Park MGM for a new Las Vegas residency this spring.

Presented by MGM Resorts International and Live Nation, Lady Gaga Jazz & Piano will comprise nine dates starting from 14 April at the 5,200-capacity venue.

The show will see Gaga perform stripped-down versions of her hits alongside music from the Great American Songbook.

The 2022 stint will be Gaga’s second at Dolby Live after her 2018/2019 residency debut which comprised two shows: Lady Gaga Enigma and Lady Gaga Jazz & Piano.

Taking place in between Gaga’s Thursday, Saturday and Sunday shows at Dolby Live will be An Evening with Silk Sonic.

Silk Sonic – which comprises Bruno Mars and Anderson .Paak – will deliver their first-ever residency on various nights between 25 February and 29 May.

The show will see Gaga perform stripped-down versions of her hits alongside music from the Great American Songbook

Elsewhere in Vegas, country star Keith Urban is picking up five of Adele’s dates at the Colosseum (cap. 4,300), Caesar’s Palace, following the postponement of her residency.

The five new dates, between 25 March and 2 April, will be in addition to Urban’s previously announced Colosseum gigs between 27–29 May.

Adele last month announced that she would be postponing her entire residency because the show “isn’t ready”.

The announcement came just 24 hours before her Live Nation-promoted residency, Weekends With Adele, was due to kick off.

The star, who is represented by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer at WME, was due to perform two shows every weekend at Caesars Palace’s Colosseum theatre (cap. 4,300) from 21 January until mid-April.

Also due to deliver residencies at the Colosseum this year are Van Morrison, Sting and Rod Stewart.

 


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Adele postpones Vegas residency, 24 hours out

Adele has postponed her entire Las Vegas residency, just 24 hours before opening night.

The Live Nation-promoted residency, dubbed Weekends With Adele, was due to kick off on Friday (21 January) but the star says her show “isn’t ready”.

“Half my team have Covid and it’s been impossible to finish the show,” she told fans on Thursday night (20 January) via Instagram, adding that “delivery delays” had also impacted her plans.

The star, who is represented by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer at WME, was due to perform two shows every weekend at Caesars Palace’s Colosseum theatre (cap. 4,300) until mid-April.

Tickets ranged from US$85 (£60) to $685 (£500), and Adele was forecast to make more than £500,000 per performance

Tickets ranged from US$85 to $685, and Adele was forecast to make more than £500,000 per performance.

The Vegas residency would have been her first live concerts in five years. Along with two dates in London’s Hyde Park this summer, they are the only shows she has announced to promote her fourth album, 30.

Speaking on Instagram, Adele said she had been “awake for 30 hours” trying to rescue the production, but had simply “run out of time”.

“It’s been impossible to finish the show,” she added. “I can’t give you what I have right now and I’m gutted.”

“I’m sorry, it’s last minute. I’m so upset and I’m really embarrassed and I’m so sorry to everyone that’s travelled again.”

Adele said she and her team are currently working on rescheduling the residency dates and that they’re “gonna finish my show and get it to where it’s supposed to be. We’ve been up against so much and it just ain’t ready. I’m really sorry”.

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Adele (@adele)

 


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Adele announces 2022 Las Vegas residency

Adele has announced her first-ever Las Vegas residency, slated to begin in January 2022.

The star, who is represented by Lucy Dickins and Kirk Sommer at WME, will perform on Friday and Saturday nights in the Colosseum theatre (cap. 4,300) at Caesars Palace Hotel from 21 January until 16 April 2022.

The concerts, dubbed Weekends With Adele, are promoted by Live Nation Las Vegas, which recently promoted Amanda Moore to lead the residency business.

Fans will have to register for pre-sale access before 3 December to be in with a chance of securing tickets for the residency. Tickets will then be available to purchase from 7 December.

The residency will see Adele follow in the footsteps of Celine Dion, Elton John, Madonna, Mariah Carey and Rod Stewart who have all performed in the famous Colosseum theatre.

Dion and John have each completed two residencies there, with Dion performing more than 1,000 times at the venue.

Usher is the current “resident” at The Colosseum and will wrap up his stint at the beginning of January.

Other notable Las Vegas residencies include Britney Spears at the Axis at Planet Hollywood (2013–2017) and Lady Gaga’s Enigma Show at Park MGM (2018–2020).

Adele’s residency announcement follows the release of her fourth studio album 30 and news of her headliner slot at “the biggest-ever” BST Hyde Park festival in London next year.

 

 

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A post shared by Adele (@adele)

 


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Jim King on BST ’22: “There is no bigger artist than Adele”

Jim King, CEO of European Festivals at AEG Presents, says the 2022 edition of British Summer Time (BST) Hyde Park is “set up to be the biggest we have ever seen”.

The London-based festival is to take place across two weeks from 24 June to 10 July next year, with concerts from Elton John (24 June), Eagles (26 June), Duran Duran (10 July), Pearl Jam (8–9 July) and Adele (1–2 July).

The BST double-header is Adele’s first confirmed concerts since her scheduled four-night run at Wembley Stadium in 2017 was cut short due to damaged vocal cords.

King tells IQ that securing the British star’s place on the bill was a “huge coup” and that the November release of her long-awaited album, 30, worked in the promoter’s favour.

“There is no artist bigger than Adele and the demand for tickets shows her unique appeal,” says King. “I had been speaking to her agent [WME’s Lucy Dickins] about the possibility for a long time but like most things, you need the timing to click, and I think 2022 just worked well for them with the new album.”

“There is no artist bigger than Adele and the demand for tickets shows her unique appeal”

Responding to some fans’ criticism that the £90 ticket price for Adele’s BST shows is too high, King says the appraisals are “grossly unfair to the artist”.

“The vast majority of tickets to see Adele had a face value under £85. Major sports are more expensive, and they play every week, every year.

“The press focus will naturally gravitate towards a very small number of higher-priced hospitality tickets which, again, when you consider the whole package of food and beverage, the show was still priced lower than many major concerts and sporting events,” he contends.

Unsurprisingly, tickets for both of the 33-year-old star’s BST dates were snapped up in minutes but King says there has been “strong sales across all [BST] shows”.

Elton John’s headline show, which opens the festival and is part of his swansong Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour, also sold out.

“[Adele’s BST shows] are still priced lower than many major concerts and sporting events”

Returning for the first time in two years due to the coronavirus pandemic, King says AEG is excited to reveal a “new look” (and a new sponsor – American Express) for the eighth outing of the festival.

“It is exciting. We will finally have the chance to reveal the new creative presentation of the event with an updated Great Oak Stage and a new look and feel to the creative areas around the site,” he says.

BST last took place in 2019 with headliners Celine Dion, Florence and the Machine and Robbie Williams, and a recorded attendance of 65,000 at each concert.

The festival launched in 2013 and, over the years, has seen performances from acts including the Rolling Stones, Bon Jovi, Celine Dion, Stevie Wonder, Lionel Richie, the Cure, Black Sabbath and Barbra Streisand.

 


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Adele announces two BST Hyde Park concerts

Adele has announced her live return with two shows at BST Hyde Park in London on July 1-2 next year.

The dates are the 33-year-old star’s first concerts to be confirmed since her scheduled four-night run at Wembley Stadium in 2017 was cut short halfway through due to damaged vocal cords.

Tickets go on general sale from 10am on Saturday, 30 October. Fans can sign up to access a presale, which begins at 10am on Thursday 28 October.

The London-born singer, who is represented by WME agents Lucy Dickins internationally and Kirk Sommer in North America, releases fourth studio album 30 on 19 November and is currently topping charts around the globe with her comeback single Easy On Me.

Adele’s 2016 Adele Live tour grossed $167.7 million (€144.3m) across 107 shows at the box office, according to Pollstar.

The Australian leg of the tour made concert history down under after playing to more than 600,000 people over eight stadium dates in 2017, breaking attendance records at all eight venues.

Staged by AEG Presents, BST Hyde Park’s 2022 line-up also currently includes Elton John (24 June), Pearl Jam (8-9) and Duran Duran (10 July).

 


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UK grassroots music venues saved by emergency grants

Iconic London venues The Troubadour and The Clapham Grand are among the 135 at-risk grassroots music venues across England that have been saved by the £3.36 million Emergency Grassroot Music Venues Fund.

The fund, which was announced by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and forms part of the UK government’s £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund, was topped up by an addition £1.1m from the original £2.25m pot to help as many venues as possible.

The Arts Council England has now awarded the grants of up to £80,000 to help some of the country’s most vulnerable venues cover on-going running costs incurred during closure, including rent and utilities.

Emergency grants of the maximum amount have been awarded to venues including The Troubador (cap. 136), where Adele and Ed Sheeran performed in the early days of their career, and The Clapham Grand (cap. 1,250), where the UK recently held its first socially distanced show since the coronavirus lockdown in March.

Culture Secretary, Oliver Dowden, says: “This government is here for culture and these grants today show we are determined to help our exceptional music industry weather the Covid storm and come back stronger.

“This fund will ensure these music venues survive to create the Adeles and Ed Sheerans of the future”

“Grassroots music venues are where the magic starts and these emergency grants from our £1.57 billion fund will ensure these music venues survive to create the Adeles and Ed Sheerans of the future.

“I encourage music fans to help too by supporting music and cultural events as they start to get going again.  We need a collective effort to help the things we love through Covid.”

Mark Davyd, Music Venue Trust, says: “We warmly welcome this first distribution from the Culture Recovery Fund which will ensure that the short term future of these venues is secured while we continue to work on how we can ensure their long term sustainability.”

“Both DCMS and Arts Council England have worked very quickly to fully understand the imminent risk of permanent closure faced by a significant number of grassroots music venues across the country, and the funding they’ve brought forward creates a real breathing space for under pressure venues.”

Elswhere in the country, the recently saved Manchester venues, Deaf Institute and Gorilla have been granted £15,000 and £31,000 respectively. The full list of recipients can be viewed here.


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‘There’s a shortcut now’: Dickinses talk artist development

Barry Dickins, the co-founder of ITB, his son Jonathan, founder of September Management, and daughter Lucy, head of UK music at WME, came together to share their industry expertise – as well as a few family anecdotes – in a keynote interview with ILMC MD Greg Parmley at Eurosonic Noorderslag (ESNS) on Thursday (16 January).

With over 100 years of industry experience between them, the trio reflected on the most significant changes to have taken place in the business in recent years.

Social media is the best way to make new acts visible nowadays, said Barry, who founded ITB along with Rod MacSween in 1978, adding that the touring circuit for emerging acts is “not the same” as it used to be.

Jonathan, who manages artists including Adele, Jamie T, London Grammar and Rex Orange County, agreed, saying that most people are finding their music online nowadays, rather than at live shows. The disappearance of a small club circuit, said Jonathan, means that “we often come across artists that are fully formed on the recording side but completely and utterly undeveloped on the live side.”

“For all its benefits,” he continued, “technology has made people lazier. It’s like there’s a shortcut to being popular now.”

“We often come across artists that are fully formed on the recording side but completely and utterly undeveloped on the live side”

The data-driven nature of artist discovery can also be a problem for the industry. “We have to be careful to not always give people exactly what they want,” said Jonathan. “The true phenomenon comes from giving people what they don’t know they want yet.”

Adele, who Jonathan and Lucy discovered and started working with at the same time, yet independently of each other, is an example of this “true phenomenon”. Lucy cited the success of artists including Ed Sheeran and Sam Smith as a result of Adele’s opening the door for a less conventional model of pop star.

“We are risking getting a more generic type of artist if everything is based on data,” concluded Jonathan.

If not based on data, how do you spot if an artist is going to be a hit, asked Parmley. “You can’t,” said Lucy, whose roster includes Mumford and Sons, Hot Chip and Mabel, in addition to Adele. “It has a lot to do with gut feeling – if it’s something I truly love, I want to work with it.” In the case of Adele, though, it was special. “It is very rare that something like that comes your way,” said Lucy. “She [Adele] blew me away song after song.”

The advent of technology has, however, also brought a lot of advantages to the business, said Lucy, who picked up agent of the year at the European Festival Awards on Wednesday. She cited the diversification of artists that are discovered nowadays, with many non-English-speaking acts breaking through. “It’s great there’s so much more diversity now,” said Lucy. “I’m so excited by how many new types of music are out there.”

“It’s great there’s so much more diversity now. I’m so excited by how many new types of music are out there”

Jonathan agreed that it is good to see things “break from beyond these borders”. “We will see genuine African superstars this year,” he stated. In particular, the September Management CEO believes there is a lot of “super-creative” work currently being done in hip hop, and that drill music will “be the rap music to unify the genre and stop hyper-local stuff”.

With so many new kinds of music coming from all over the world, Barry emphasised the importance of keeping a young team around to ensure enduring relevance. “I want to see development within ITB and see the company get some great new young people,” he said.

Artist management has also changed over the years, said Jonathan. Deals are way more transparent and flexible, there’s an easier route to market than ever before and a lot more choice of artists, he said, but “it’s still all about working with the artists you believe in and taking a long-term approach”.

“I’ve always played it long,” he said, explaining that he works with artists that he believes will have a long career, rather than taking “quick money”.

“It’s not a race – it all depends where you end up.”

 


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