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LN 2020 results: Michael Rapino predicts huge 2022

Live Nation’s share price broke the US$90 mark for the first time yesterday ahead of the company’s Q4 2020 earnings call, buoyed by the roll-out of coronavirus vaccines globally and unprecedented fan demand for its shows, illustrated by rapid sell-outs for both Reading Festival and Creamfields in the UK.

Shares in Live Nation Entertainment reached an all-time high of $91.18 – some $15 higher than they were pre-pandemic – on 25 February, with Wall Street untroubled by the headline figures in the company’s most recent financial report, which show a 92% drop in revenue (to $237.3 million) for the fourth quarter (Q4) and 84% slump (to $1.86 billion) for the entire year.

In total, the company lost over $1bn in 2020, with its sponsorship and advertising division the only part of the business to make a profit: It earnt $82m, compared to a $639m loss for Live Nation Concerts and $375m loss for Ticketmaster.

Despite this, investor confidence in Live Nation’s long-term potential remains strong, and CEO Michael Rapino was bullish when taking questions from analysts, also highlighting the company’s cost savings and investment in new technology in 2020 and looking forward to the light at the end of the tunnel. “It appears that the timing to release [fans’s] pent-up supply and demand is now approaching,” he explained. “Vaccine distribution is accelerating, and declines in Covid cases throughout most of the world gives us even more confidence that a safe and meaningful return to shows will soon be possible.”

“I have never been more excited about the opportunities in front of us”

To illustrate that pent-up demand for tickets, Rapino (pictured) used the example of the aforementioned UK festivals. “Just to show you when we keep talking about pent-up demand, Reading and Leeds went on sale, thanks to the government-outlined new plan for the summer, and sold 100,000 tickets in 72 hours,” he told LightShed Partners’ Brandon Ross. “Creamfields went on sale and sold out in 48 hours, over 70,000 [tickets]. So we are seeing the fan and [this is] what we’ve been talking about; they are excited to get back to the show as soon as we get the green lights in these markets to open up.”

Addressing the financials, Live Nation president Joe Berchtold revealed that the company ended with 2020 with $950m in cost savings compared to 2019. Its $500m debt raise in January, he added, gives LN $2bn in available liquidity and $1.1bn in free cash.

Looking to this summer, Rapino said he sees shows returning on a region-by-region basis (a “module model”) in 2021, with 2022 set to be a huge year for major international tours, depending on the vaccination status locally. “Given the limited touring activity in 2020 and ’21, the pipeline for 2022 is much stronger than usual, with almost twice as many major touring artists on cycle in 2022 [as] in a typical year – about 45 artists versus the usual 25,” he said.

Rapino added: “For both the US and UK, projections indicate that everyone who wants a vaccine will be able to get one by May or June, with Europe and most other markets following a few months later. Given the mass social and economic toll the lockdown has put on the public, we believe there will be strong momentum to reopen society swiftly as soon as vaccines are readily available, and we believe outdoor activity will be the first to happen.

“The pipeline for 2022 is much stronger than usual, with almost twice as many major touring artists on cycle”

“So, while the timing of return to live will continue to vary across global markets, every sign points to beginning safely in many countries sometime this summer and scaling further from there.”

In a statement released with the earnings report, Rapino praises Live Nation staff for their resilience during a “challenging” year and highlights the strides the company has made towards securing its post-Covid-19 future.

“Over the last year, leaders across all our business lines of concerts, ticketing and sponsorship have been analysing ways to improve their businesses,” he says. “Some of our key initiatives include re-organising to become more nimble while also reducing our cost structure by $200 million; building concert streaming and direct-to-consumer businesses to expand our revenue streams; advancing our technology initiatives globally while accelerating the shift to digital tickets to meet changing needs of fans, venues and artists; and reinforcing our balance sheet to endure this period, while maintaining a strong position to build our business for the future and act on opportunities as we identify them, such as our recent acquisition of the streaming platform Veeps and a continued pipeline of bolt-on acquisitions throughout the globe.

“So while this past year has been challenging for the company, our employees, fans, artists and so many others globally impacted by Covid, I have never been more excited about the opportunities in front of us.”

 


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ILMC 33: One week to go

There is just one week to go until the global concert industry comes together again for the International Live Music Conference (ILMC), which returns as virtual event from 3 to 5 March 2021.

Hundreds of leading figures from across the global live music business are contributing to ILMC’s digital debut, as well as this year’s ILMC Production Meeting and Green Events and Innovations Conference (GEI), which take place on 2 March. The ILMC conference schedule now features the largest line-up of guest speakers at any live music conference ever, with more than 250 speakers in attendance.

Over 1,000 delegates will attend ILMC 33, including executives including Irving Azoff (Azoff Music), Klaus-Peter Schulenberg (CTS Eventim), industry commentator Bob Lefsetz, Emma Banks (CAA), Tim Leiweke (Oak View Group), Jason Danter (Lady Gaga/Madonna), Lucy Dickins (WME), Pandora founder Tim Westergren, Sam Kirby Yoh (UTA) and Mumford & Sons’ Ben Lovett.

The 33rd edition of the top global platform for concert and festival professionals features 60+ meetings, workshops and keynotes across three days, alongside 50 showcases from new artists, presented by top booking agencies and export offices. Within the ILMC schedule, new event brand PULSE is a day of discussion around the intersection of technology and live music, and the Experience Economy Meeting (TEEM) focuses on non-music content.

“This is a crucial moment to bring the global live music business together”

The Arthur Awards, the live music industry’s Oscar equivalents, will stream live from the stage of the Royal Albert Hall as the iconic venue celebrates its 150th anniversary.

Companies supporting ILMC 33 include Live Nation, Ticketmaster, CTS Eventim, ASM Global, Showsec, Tysers, Hearby & Semmel Concerts.

ILMC head Greg Parmley says: “This edition of ILMC will mark one year since the live music business began to shut due to Covid-19, and it takes place just as markets around the world are pushing forward with plans to reopen.

“This is a crucial moment to bring the global live music business together to define its restart.”

The full schedule and details of all sessions and speakers are available at 33.ilmc.com. If you haven’t already, there is still time to secure your ILMC 33 pass at the discounted spring rate of £139/£159 until 18.00 GMT this Friday (26 February).

 


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Glen Rainsbury joins Ticketek as GM

Industry veteran Glen Rainsbury has joined Ticketek as general manager for Australia and New Zealand.

Rainsbury, who will be based in Melbourne, brings a wealth of experience to the role that includes senior positions at the Chelsea Flower Show, Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane Cricket Ground (The Gabba) and Etihad Stadium (now Marvel Stadium) in Melbourne. In recent years, he has held executive roles with both Live Nation and Frontier Touring, and in 2020 helped coordinate the work of the new Live Entertainment Industry Forum, for which he was named one of IQ’s Unsung Heroes.

He was most recently director of venue strategy and business development for AEG-aligned promoter Frontier Touring.

Rainsbury joins alongside another new hire for Ticketek parent TEG, which has also appointed Lee Jones to the role of director of ticketing solutions. Both Rainsbury and Jones will report to Cameron Hoy, TEG’s CCO and managing director of ticketing.

“Glen’s CV gives him a 360-degree view of the live entertainment sector, [which] makes him a great fit for this new role”

“Glen’s CV gives him a 360-degree view of the live entertainment sector. It makes him a great fit for this new role, which is key to Ticketek’s strategy to ensure we continue to lead the industry with an enhanced operated model as our industry emerges from Covid-19,” says Hoy.

“I am thrilled that Lee is leading our ticketing solutions team to ensure the full breadth of Ticketek’s technology and capability is deployed and leveraged for the benefit of our partners globally. Lee’s experience in ticketing strategy and solution design is unequalled in our industry.”

Geoff Jones, CEO of TEG, adds: “Glen’s extensive experience, dedication and attention to detail make him a great addition to Cam’s team as we continue to roll out TEG’s integrated model.

“Lee’s commitment to delivering excellence to our partners is second to none, we are thrilled she is stepping into this vital new role.”

 


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Austrian court finds against Viagogo T&Cs

In a probe into Viagogo’s terms and conditions, the supreme court of Austria has found more than 40 clauses of the secondary ticket site’s general terms for buyers and sellers are illegal.

Finding in favour of VKI, the Austrian Consumers’ Association, the Supreme Court of Justice (Oberster Gerichtshof, OGH) ruled that 42 clauses of the site’s general T&Cs, including provisions on refunds, replacement tickets and the supremacy of Swiss law, are unlawful in Austria.

Notable clauses deemed illegal in the OGH ruling include:

“We hope the OGH’s decision encourages other jurisdictions to ensure that their consumers are equally protected”

According to anti-touting group FEAT (Face-value European Alliance for Ticketing), Viagogo will legally be required have to amend all 42 clauses, both for viagogo.at and for Austrian consumers accessing the site via viagogo.com.

“For a platform that claims to serve fans, the level of protection that Viagogo offers its users, as brought to light in this ruling, is shocking,” comments FEAT campaign lead Katie O’Leary. “We welcome the OGH’s decision and hope that it encourages other jurisdictions to ensure that their consumers are equally protected.”

In May, the OGH ruled that Viagogo and other secondary ticketing sites must disclose the identity of ticket sellers, including name and address, and whether tickets are personalised ahead of ticket purchase.

 


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UK’s first live music biz body launches

LIVE, the new body serving as the collective voice of the UK live music business, officially launches today (18 February), comprising 13 industry associations representing more than 3,000 businesses.

LIVE (Live music Industry Venues and Entertainment) is a federation spanning the UK’s live music ecosystem, including artists, managers, venues, festivals, promoters, agents and production and ticketing companies. Membership is made up of the principal associations, representing 3,150 companies, over 4,000 artists and 2,000 backstage workers.

Kilimanjaro Live’s Stuart Galbraith (pictured), who was instrumental in the formation of LIVE alongside Live Nation’s Phil Bowdery and the association heads, says: “LIVE is focused on securing the long-term support for our industry that we vitally need and protecting the jobs and livelihoods from the double whammy of Covid-19 and Brexit.

“We are a £4.5 billion, world-leading industry, and by bringing together all of the unique voices within it and working collaboratively, we are in a far better position to protect and support our ecosystem as a result.”

As one of the first sectors to close at the outbreak of the pandemic, and one of the last to reopen, live music has suffered enormously throughout the coronavirus crisis. LIVE was initially formed in response to the pandemic and quickly began coordinating and supporting the industry’s response.

“By … working collaboratively, we are in a far better position to protect and support our ecosystem”

Having soft-launched last year, LIVE has already become the voice of the industry to government and the media, with successes including the #LetTheMusicPlay campaign, which helped secure millions of pounds’ worth of funding from the Culture Recovery Fund.

The organisation is currently campaigning for a three-year extension to the reduced cultural VAT rate on tickets; a government-backed insurance scheme to allow events to go ahead when it is safe to do so; and further targeted financial support for the sector to protect jobs and infrastructure, while its LIVE Touring group is working with the British government to find a solutions to the difficulties posed by Brexit.

Elsewhere, the LIVE Sustainability group convenes the environmental experts to work in tandem with industry leaders to develop a sector-wide charter and resource.

“It’s long overdue that the UK’s live music industry has a properly representative body, and LIVE will be that unified voice as the industry comes out of lockdown and beyond,” says LIVE CEO Greg Parmley. “The unprecedented challenges we face might paint a bleak picture, and this is a critical time, but together we can help protect jobs and the future of live music as we move toward restoring the UK industry to its world-leading best.

“LIVE is an opportunity to represent the whole of the live industry, from the smallest show to the biggest festival. We are delighted that the founding associations include organisations at the very top of our industry and those with deep connections into the foundations on which that industry is built.”

 


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Ticketmaster launches global Livestream product

Following the success of livestream campaigns with Niall Horan and Dua Lipa, Ticketmaster has combined its international artist services and US music teams to create a new global music team overseeing the launch of its Ticketmaster Livestream service worldwide.

The platform, which launched in 2020, has sold tickets for some of the biggest live streams to date, including Dua Lipa’s Studio 2054 and Niall Horan live from the Royal Albert Hall (125,000 tickets), as well as virtual shows by RBD, Megan thee Stallion, Mika, Glass Animals, Biffy Clyro and Dermot Kennedy.

David Marcus, the former head of Ticketmaster’s North American music division, will head up the global music team as executive vice-president of global music, working closely with UK-based Sam Isles, Ticketmaster senior vice-president of artist services.

“The live experience is the ultimate moment of connection between an artist and fan, and it’s our job to power these moments,” comments Marcus.

“The beauty of virtual shows is that we’re seeing global viewing – performances in London or LA are selling tickets to fans in NZ, Spain or Singapore”

“Now with this expansion, our offering is a global one-stop-shop run by a global team with local expertise. Our mission is to work with artists to make it as easy as possible for fans to experience the live music they love.”

Available in ten languages and 135 currencies, Ticketmaster Livestream has already sold tickets for virtual events to fans in more than 180 countries. The “platform-agnostic” service is compatible with any streaming service of the artist’s choice.

“Our technology quickly pivoted to selling streaming tickets at scale, and the acceleration in artists going virtual to engage has been remarkable,” continues Marcus. “So, too, is the readiness of fans to pay to access their favourite artists in this way.

“The beauty of virtual shows is that we’re seeing global viewing – performances in London or LA are selling tickets to fans in New Zealand, Spain or Singapore, [and] it’s revolutionising the way artists can connect. Nothing will replace the live experience, but this represents a new form of entertainment with its own rewards, and it’s definitely something that will remain for years to come.”

 


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Deadline nears for Arthur Awards 2021 voting

Voting for the 2021 Arthur Awards, the Oscars of the international live music business, closes this Friday (14 February) at 18.00 GMT.

Awarding industry excellence in 11 categories – including new-for-this-year awards for Tour of the Decade and Unsung Hero of the year (based on the IQ feature of the same name) – the 2021 Arthurs take place as part of ILMC 33 in March.

Normally a separate, ticketed event, the Arthurs is throwing open its virtual doors for 2021, inviting all ILMC delegates to attend the ceremony on 4 March. The awards will stream live from London’s most iconic venue, the Royal Albert Hall, from 18.30–19.30, with proceedings led once again by long-time Arthur Awards hostess Emma Banks.

In addition to the new awards, some of the Arthurs’ most popular category winners will line up to decide the Arthur of the Decade, while the special Bottle Award will recognise one individual’s outstanding contribution to the industry.

The Arthurs is throwing open its virtual doors for 2021, inviting all ILMC delegates to attend

To vote for your Arthur Awards 2021 winners, click here. A full list of award nominees is below:

THE PROMOTER’S PROMOTER
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

Phil Bowdery, Live Nation
Kelly Chappel, Live Nation Entertainment
Folkert Koopmans, FKP Scorpio
Barrie Marshall, Marshall Arts
Simon Moran, SJM Concerts
Herman Schueremans, Live Nation Belgium
Anna Sjölund, Live Nation Sweden
Stephan Thanscheidt, FKP Scorpio
Steve Tilley, Kilimanjaro Live

LIGGERS’ FAVOURITE FESTIVAL
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

British Summer Time, UK
Eurockéennes, France
Glastonbury, UK
Montreux Jazz Festival, Switzerland
Rock am Ring, Germany
Rock Werchter, Belgium

SECOND LEAST OFFENSIVE AGENT
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

Natasha Bent, Mother Artists
Rob Challice, Paradigm
Lucy Dickins, WME
John Giddings, Solo
Mike Greek, CAA
Summer Marshall, CAA
Geoff Meall, Paradigm
Steve Strange, X-ray Touring
Steve Zapp, ITB

SERVICES ABOVE & BEYOND
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

Beat the Street
Eat to the Beat
eps
PRG
Rock-it Cargo
Showsec

THE GAFFER (PRODUCTION CHAMPION)
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

Jake Berry (U2)
Jason Danter (Lady Gaga)
Tony Gittins (Depeche Mode)
Chris Kansy (Roger Waters)
Arthur Kemish (Taylor Swift)
Bill Leabody (Coldplay)
Chris Marsh (Ed Sheeran)
Wob Roberts (One Direction)
Jesse Sandler (Bon Jovi)
John Zajonc (Metallica)

THE PEOPLE’S ASSISTANT
(Arthur of the Decade showdown)

Claire Bewers, Paradigm
Sarah Donovan, Live Nation UK
Samantha Henfrey, UTA
Sandra Swift, AEG Presents
Amber McKenzie, CAA
Eliza-Jane Oliver, AEG Presents
San Phillips, Kilimanjaro Live
Charlie Renton, Primary Talent International
Clare Utting, Paradigm

TOMORROW’S NEW BOSS
(2021 Award)

Alexandra Ampofo, Metropolis Music (UK)
Jolien Augustyns, Live Nation (BE)
Kedist Bezabih, FKP Scorpio (NO)
Madie Cavilla, Paradigm (UK)
Virág Csiszár, Sziget Cultural Management (HU)
Sally Dunstone, X-ray Touring (UK)
Bertie Gibbon, ATC Live (UK)
Artur Kasper, Der Bomber der Herzen (DE)
Bilge Morden, CAA (UK)
Filippo Palermo, Untitled Group (AU)
Camila Salinas, Primavera Sound (ES)
Joe Skarzynski, production co-ordinator (US)

THE UNSUNG HERO
(2021 Award)

Javier Ajenjo, Sonorama Ribera Festival (ES)
Alexandra Ampofo, Metropolis Music (UK)
Bobby Bähler, Gurtenfestival (CH)
Sandra Beckmann & Tom Koperek, Alarmstufe Rot (DE)
Maria Brunner, Musically Fed (US)
#feedourcrew (ZA)
Charlie Hernandez, Just A Bunch Of Roadies (US)
Michael Kill, Night Time Industry Association (UK)
Barrie Knight, Big Knight In (UK)
Music Venue Trust (UK)
Paul Reed, Association of Independent Festivals (UK)
Evelyn Richardson & Glen Rainsbury, Live Entertainment Industry Forum (AU)

THE ULTIMATE VENUE’S VENUE
(Special Judges’ Category)

To be decided by a committee of industry judges

TOUR OF THE DECADE
(Voting live on the night)

Beyoncé
Bon Jovi
Bruce Springsteen
Coldplay
Ed Sheeran
Paul McCartney
Roger Waters
Rolling Stones
Taylor Swift
U2

THE BOTTLE AWARD
Awarded to an individual who has contributed greatly to the live music industry

Check out the 2020 Arthur Awards winners here. To reserve your ticket for the Arthur Awards 2021, click here to register for ILMC.

 


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Stubagogo will spin off StubHub international

Both Viagogo and StubHub have signalled they are willing to sell off the latter’s international operations in order to clear the remaining legal hurdles to the merger of the two businesses.

The UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said earlier this week that StubHub must divest its business outside North America in order secure regulatory approval for its takeover by Switzerland-based Viagogo, which was largely complete by February 2020. Viagogo, led by StubHub founder Eric Baker, announced its intention to acquire US-based StubHub for US$4.05 billion in cash in late 2019, just before the pandemic put the brakes on live events globally.

In a statement, a spokesperson for StubHub says the company is happy for its business outside North America – which includes offices in Europe, South America and Asia, and is believed to account for around 10% of StubHub’s overall business – to continue under new ownership if it secures CMA approval for the merger. (The CMA must also vet the purchaser of the StubHub international business, as well as the terms of the acquisition.)

“StubHub is happy to have found common ground with the CMA that allows our North American business to move forward”

“StubHub is happy to have found common ground with the CMA that allows our North American business to move forward with the merger with Viagogo and our international business to move forward under new ownership,” says the spokesperson.

“We will continue to work with the CMA to implement the agreed-upon remedy. Once completed, consumers will continue to benefit from the safe and secure marketplaces provided by both businesses.”

“We are pleased to have found a remedy that is acceptable to the CMA that will allow everyone involved to move forward with clarity and certainty,” reads a similar statement from Viagogo. “Importantly, both viagogo and StubHub will continue to provide a safe and secure platform for people to buy and sell tickets to events all over the world.”

The CMA’s investigation found that the combined Viagogo-StubHub business would control a market share of more than 90% of the for-profit secondary ticketing market in the UK. The company faces stiffer competition in the US, where ticket touting is more accepted, from the likes of Ticketmaster Resale, Ticket Network, Vivid Seats and SeatGeek.

 


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Keep VAT at 5%, pleads UK live sector

Leading UK live entertainment industry organisations and associations have written to the chancellor of the exchequer urging him to maintain the temporary 5% rate of value-added tax on ticket sales.

While lower rate of VAT was brought in last year, the business has yet to feel the benefit due to its near-total closure since March 2020. In the letter, addressed to Rishi Sunak, the signatories say that if the government raises VAT back to 20% in the March budget, the policy will have been pointless and will pull millions of pounds’ worth of support when the industry most needs it.

“The whole sector has been brought to its knees by the pandemic,” says Lucy Noble, chair of the National Arenas Association (NAA). “Increasing VAT on tickets by 300% at this time could be the final nail in the coffin for many in the music industry. And at precisely the moment when people urgently need the joy of music in their lives.”

The Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee recommended a three-year extension to the 5% VAT policy in their Impacts of COVID-19 on DCMS Sectors inquiry in July last year. The committee’s chair, Julian Knight MP, says: “Pulling the plug on the reduced VAT rate for ticket sales now would be short-sighted. The DCMS Committee recommended in its July 2020 report that the 5% VAT rate should be kept for three years.

“With live events still unable to operate, this is needed more than ever. I fully support LIVE [Live music Industry, Venues & Entertainment]’s campaign. Now is the time to extend support for our vibrant creative sector, which could be a cornerstone of our economic recovery from this crisis.”

“Increasing VAT on tickets by 300% at this time could be the final nail in the coffin for many in the music industry”

In addition to the NAA and umbrella organisation LIVE, signatories to the letter include the Concert Promoters Association, Music Managers Forum, Music Venue Trust, UK Theatre, the Association of Independent Festivals, the Entertainment Agents Association and the Musicians’ Union.

Julian Bird, chief executive of UK Theatre and SOLT (Society of London Theatre), comments: ‘The theatre industry, alongside others in the performing arts and live events sector, was first into lockdown last March, and will almost definitely be one of the last out. With a usual annual audience of over 34m, generating around £1bn for the Treasury every year, the UK’s theatres contribute hugely to the economic and cultural life of this country, and will be key for local recovery.

“It is vital that the government helps ensure the industry’s survival by continuing the reduced VAT rates.’

Prior to the outbreak of the pandemic, the UK’s creative industries were growing at five times the rate of the wider economy, generating £11.25 billion in gross value added each year and supporting over 600,000 jobs. Without urgent and targeted government intervention, the companies, producers, performers and infrastructure that support these industry’s complex ecosystem will not be able to recover once the pandemic is over, warns LIVE.

 


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Countdown begins to ILMC 33: Virtually Live

There’s just a month to go until the industry comes together once more for the 33rd International Live Music Conference (ILMC), streaming live from London to thousands of workplaces, home offices and sofas worldwide.

ILMC 33: Virtually Live will be the largest and most international edition of the conference to date, with the online-only format allowing for a greater number of panels, meetings, keynotes, networking opportunities and after-hours events than ever before.

Debuting in 2021 are two new conferences-within-a-conference, exhibition showcase The Experience Economy Meeting (TEEM) and the tech-focused PULSE, while returning favourites include the ILMC Production Meeting (IPM), the Green Events and Innovations Conference (GEI) and the industry’s Oscars equivalent, the Arthur Awards, which will stream live from London’s iconic Royal Albert Hall on 4 March.

Also streaming live will be a series of showcases presented by the planet’s premier booking agencies, with other evening entertainment including the ever-popular quiz of the year and poker tourney, which – while taking place somewhere deep in hyperspace – is raising funds for the Stagehand Covid-19 crew relief fund back in the real world.

Conference highlights include sessions tackling the biggest topics of the day, from the festival season and the changing agency sector to reopening venues, the evolving world of A&R, mental health and the insurance market, as well as can’t-miss keynote interviews with Irving Azoff and Klaus-Peter Schulenberg and a special live edition of the Bob Lefsetz Podcast.

For the first time, this year’s conference is open to both existing members and ILMC newbies

Guest speakers include powerhouse agents (Lucy Dickins, Tom Windish, Emma Banks, Sam Kirby Yoh), festival bosses (Fruzsina Szép, Mathieu Jaton, Jim King), recording artists (Matt Heafy, Frank Turner), leading promoters (Phil Bowdery, Steve Homer, Stephan Thanscheidt), venue execs (Tim Leiweke, Stuart Clumpas) and more, with all ILMC delegates also invited to join the conversation on the cutting-edge virtual conference platform.

So with this year’s conference, for the first time in ILMC history, open to both existing members and ILMC newbies, there’s no excuse for not logging on to live music’s greatest gathering in March.

For more information on ILMC 33, which takes from 3 to 5 March 2021, visit the ILMC website. Full three-day tickets, as well as passes for IPM and GEI (on 2 March), are available at a discounted winter rate of £119/£139 until 6pm GMT on 19 February.

Read the full conference guide in the digital edition of IQ 96 now:


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