fbpx

PROFILE

MY SUBSCRIPTION

LOGOUT

x

The latest industry news to your inbox.

    

I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

Tixxy bolsters team with key music tech hires

Start-up predictive concert recommendation service, Tixxy, is expanding its team with the addition of three new members of staff with experience in the realms of music, technology, and start-up culture.

Steve Peele II joins Ohio-based Tixxy as head of growth, where he will call upon his past experience at companies like dotloop, Astronomer, Everything But the House, Inman News and API Nation. Most recently, Peele served as a marketing director at US-based software development firm Nexient. He joins the Tixxy team as not only a marketing guru, but also a lifelong musician, ready to join the two worlds.

Cody Grup brings years of experience in the music industry to Tixxy, including as a booking agent and talent buyer for a number of operations including the Love as Arson Agency, The Verso Group and Go Ahead Booking, keeping his finger on the pulse of local music scenes in America in ways that will be invaluable to Tixxy’s work with local venues.

“Joining Eron Bucciarelli and the Tixxy team was an absolute no-brainer”

As founder and managing director of Force Media Management, music and technology have long been a hybrid focus for Randy Nichols. He has also worked with New York-based artist management company Red Light Management as an artist manager and advised the likes of Bandsintown, Immensity, Tension Division, and atVenu, on their music and technology ventures.

“Having been part of the software and startup community for the entirety of my career, executed two successful exits, and generally drawn toward all things technology, joining Eron [Bucciarelli, CEO] and the Tixxy team was an absolute no-brainer,” says Peele (pictured).

“Outside of the fact that I’m a diehard musician and music fan, Eron’s vision, industry knowledge, and track record speaks for itself. What is most intriguing for me is how I can help guide our growth engine in a scalable way by bringing my SaaS marketing experience to a product that has a natural depth and reach within an industry I care so much about.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Spanish developers bring Covid-safe app to market

A new ticketing services operation based in Barcelona claims to be attracting interest from some of the world’s biggest live event companies, thanks to its ability to include health record details of fans as part of their pass to attend shows.

Barcelona-based TiketBlok says it has developed an app that makes it possible to identify everyone who attends a major event through their mobile phones. The app also allows event organisers to establish a communications channel with those attendees, as well as including identity and health certification within the ticket itself.

TiketBlok has already trialled its system successfully at a Manel concert on 21 May in Gerona, where 1,000 people gathered without social distancing after passing an antigen test. The company also says it has attracted the attention of Live Nation, the WiZink Center in Madrid and opera houses in Vienna.

“Our tool allows venues and event organisers to identify every single attendee, communicate with them and certify their identity and health status, says TiketBlok managing director Javier de Esteban, adding that for the Manel concert in Gerona’s Sala La Mirona venue, more than 5,000 notifications were sent to attendees via SMS, email or through the app itself.

TiketBlok trialled its system successfully at a concert with 1,000 people without social distancing

He continues, “Our app works as a ‘smart wallet’ so all attendees have to enter the venue with their own app: One phone, one ticket. This is how we identify the whole audience, and how we are able to communicate with them anytime in real time. We also include the identity certification through a biometric analysis of the attendee ID or passport and the health status.”

TiketBlok can integrate the AOKpass health certificate – a Covid-free certification project backed by the International Chamber of Commerce, International SOS and SGS Group – into its tickets. The company says it connects with official health certificate issuers to include on the ticket itself whether the ticket holder has passed a pre-event antigen test or has had a certified vaccination.

Company MD de Esteban adds, “The best part is that we are system agnostic. It doesn’t matter who sold the tickets, you can use TiketBlok to manage the tickets and the access.”

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

100 issues young: New IQ Magazine out now

The landmark 100th issue of IQ Magazine, which includes reflections from staff past and present on IQ’s first 17 years, is now available to read for subscribers.

In addition to this rare moment of self-reflection, the 100th (June 2021) edition of IQ has in-depth features on post-pandemic recruitment and restaffing, the ‘New Europeans’ who have been forced by Brexit to relocate from the UK to the continent, and the new independent booking outfits shaking up the agency world.

Columns, meanwhile, look at accessibility, contracts and the devastating cancellation of Australia’s Bluesfest – which was cancelled at the 11th hour following a single positive Covid-19 test – while regular content such as news analysis and new agency signings will keep you abreast of all the latest developments in the international live music industry.

As usual, the majority of magazine content will appear online in some form in the next four weeks. However, if you can’t wait for your fix of essential live music industry features, opinion and analysis, click here to subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month – or check out what you’re missing out on with the limited preview below:

 

IQ subscribers can log in and read the full magazine now.

 


This article forms part of IQ’s Covid-19 resource centre – a knowledge hub of essential guidance and updating resources for uncertain times.

Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ IndexIQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

150,000 buy tickets for virtual Nightwish show

Finnish metal band Nightwish were joined by more than 150,000 fans from 108 countries for their recent virtual concert experience, An Evening With Nightwish in a Virtual World, which streamed on Friday 28 and Saturday 29 May.

Six months in the making, the show – a co-production of promoter Fullsteam Agency, VR studio Zoan and the band’s management company, Till Dawn They Count – follows Fullsteam and Zoan’s previous collaboration with the city of Helsinki, which attracted 1.4 million fans to a free virtual show by rap group JVG last May.

An Evening with Nightwish welcomed fans of Nightwish, Finland’s most successful musical export, to a 3D virtual world designed in partnership with the band, where they could watch the concert while also moving around and interacting with other concertgoers. Tickets for the show were priced between €25 and €109.

According to Fullsteam, that translates to ticket income in the seven figures (more than €1m), equivalent to a “large stadium-sized concert”.

“The key is to understand that we are not trying to replicate a live show here – it is a completely different thing”

“We all knew that there would be a lot of demand for this show, but honestly I was blown away by how great it turned out and how many tickets we sold,” says Fullsteam’s Rauha Kyyrö. “I think there is a huge potential for virtual shows that can be very unique experiences for fans.

“I think the key is to understand that we are not trying to replicate a live show here – it is a completely different thing and has to be designed to be enjoyed at home and on your portable devices. And I personally don’t think anything will ever replace the live experience anyway.”

A 30-person team – half of them Nightwish fans –  from technical producer Zoan was responsible for creating the virtual world, which included a virtual tavern, The Islanders’ Arms. Zoan used a combination of high-end technology, such as photorealistic scans, and the latest Unreal game engine to produce the experience.

“It feels amazing to have cracked the code on how to provide virtual live entertainment directly to the fans,” says Zoan CEO Miikka Rosendahl. “This is the beginning of an entire new segment in the music industry.”

 


This article forms part of IQ’s Covid-19 resource centre – a knowledge hub of essential guidance and updating resources for uncertain times.

Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ IndexIQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Ticketmaster integrates with Snapchat

Ticketmaster has partnered with Snap, the developer of Snapchat, to launch two TM-branded ‘experiences’ in the popular teen-friendly video-sharing app.

The integration with Ticketmaster is one of several new features announced at Snap’s partner summit yesterday (20 May), with the leading ticketing company getting its own layer on Snapchat’s location-sharing feature, Snap Chat, as well as a Ticketmaster ‘Mini’ (Snap jargon for an in-app game or utlity) that allows Snapchat users to share concerts they are interested in with their friends and buy tickets.

Map Layers launches with two partners: Ticketmaster and restaurant review site The Infatuation. The Infatuation’s Layer overlays Infatuation-approved restaurants, while the Ticketmaster layer displays upcoming concerts at nearby venues. The Ticketmaster layer, which rolls out later this year, will take Snapchatters directly into the Ticketmaster Mini to buy tickets to the show.

The Ticketmaster layer rolls out later this year

The TM Mini also allows users to swipe right or left on different artists to connect with Snapchat friends across the world who want to see the same show.

At launch, the Ticketmaster layer and Mini will specifically on live music events, a spokesperson confirms.

The integration with Ticketmaster is the latest live music partnership for Snap, following an earlier tie-up with Ticketmaster’s parent company, Live Nation, as well as secondary ticketing site SeatGeek. Snapchat had around 265 million daily users as of Q4 2020.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Spotify announces ticketed livestream series

Leading music streaming service Spotify has announced a new ‘virtual concert experience’ taking place over five dates in May and June, in the company’s biggest move in the concert livestreaming space to date.

Five pre-recorded shows, produced by Driift (Niall Horan, Kyle Minogue, Glastonbury Presents: Live at Worthy Farm), will stream as live on 27 May, 3 June, 10 June, 17 June and 24 June, with tickets for each live stream priced at US$15 (or local currency equivalent).

In date order, performers are the Black Keys, Rag’n’Bone Man, Bleachers’ Jack Antonoff, Leon Bridges and Girl in Red, who will perform from the Blue Front Café in Mississippi; London’s Roundhouse; a bus travelling from Brooklyn, New York, to Asbury Park, New Jersey; the Gold-Diggers’ Hotel in Los Angeles; and a production studio in Oslo, respectively.

Each concert will last between 40 and 75 minutes, according to Spotify, which already links to external live streams from artist pages in the Spotify app, and formerly lent its name to a number of concerts themed around its most popular playlists.

“I’m excited to collaborate with Spotify on this intimate concert experience that will feature songs from across my catalog, including a few tunes from my new album, Gold-Diggers Sound,” says Leon Bridges.

“This new initiative with Spotify will give fans a great way to connect with their favourite artists”

“I’ve truly missed seeing my fans around the world this year, and we are working hard to bring the concert experience to your home, thanks to Spotify.”

Fans of the five artists will soon start to receive notifications in Spotify to buy tickets for the shows (starting with the Black Keys today, 19 May).

“We have always been a band that loves to play live in venues of all shapes and sizes. The past year has been tough for musicians and fans alike, so we wanted to find a way to share this live performance of songs from our new project, Delta Kream, from a place we love, the Blue Front Café, the oldest active juke joint in America,” say the band in a joint statement.

“We’re excited to be a part of this new initiative with Spotify that will give fans a great way to connect with their favourite artists.”

Tickets for the five shows are available from Spotify.live. Driift-produced Live at Worthy Farm airs this Saturday (22 May).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Tech gives us the chance to create new paradigms

As the world begins to open up at a steady (or not so steady) pace, the questions around technology and how it will impact the live business when we are back in full swing remains.

That being said, the reason we are starting this monthly column is to keep you all informed and up to date as to the changes around technology that may very well become part and parcel of the live industry.

Change is real and although there may be some fatigue around livestreams, which dominated much of 2020, it is vital to remember that this technology in itself will become part of how we structure deals and open up new revenue streams for our artists. We must learn, adapt and look to the future. Nobody wants to be the next dinosaur.

Never before has it been so vital for an industry to get in the middle of this new opportunity – and indeed view it as an opportunity and not a hindrance. Agents and promoters worldwide have a chance to be part of something new, or face losing out.

We must learn, adapt and look to the future. Nobody wants to be the next dinosaur

On a personal level, I see us being at a crossroad and view the impact of technology in the live music industry as a way for us to better ourselves and our business.

The pandemic has been devastating to this sector, to put it lightly, and therefore technology, from livestreams to the new excitement around NFTs, gives us a chance to create new paradigms that I believe can help us give the live industry a cushion should such an event happen again.

This is why I feel so strongly and passionately about it all – we must protect and improve our ecosystem.

In order to make change, we need to do something that is unheard of in the music industry – all be on the same page, putting our individual egos to the side and focusing on how we can create these new models and put live front and centre in artist planning.

This column will look into specific market news on a monthly basis and analyse the impact it will have on our business whilst looking at both the pros and cons around each scenario and aim to problem solve.

[Tech] can help us give the live industry a cushion should such an event [like the pandemic] happen again

Live stream is probably not the term on everyone’s lips right now, but I am glad they are present. Not only have they been an opportunity for artists to have a creative output, but more importantly, as a whole, we have started to shift the conversation forwards when it comes to the public paying for artist content.

There should be no shame in artists charging for content that they put time and effort into in the future, as there is no issue in sports and other sectors that charge for content.

Therefore, with that in mind, the excitement will be working out how we can incorporate an element of livestreaming into our artist touring in the near future.

The live industry has been working on a largely copy/paste model for the last few decades, with artists touring Europe and hitting the “key cities” – but who said this was effective? What if your fans are spread out across a country? How do you reach everyone whilst also building your artists fanbase bigger and truly engaging fans? Geo-locking could be that way forward.

The excitement will be working out how we can incorporate an element of livestreaming into our artist touring

Imagine putting on a tour and playing your shows in the usual cities where you expect most traffic and sales but giving fans located in the nearby regions an opportunity to tune in to that show with their friends and family at home at a discounted rate and also allowing them to engage with the artist in some manner, whether through a pre-show element in the dressing room, Q&A sessions or chat rooms with other fans.

This opens the door to valuable revenue for artists of all levels through livestream ticketing income, exclusive merchandise income, tipping, brand deals, virtual meet and greets and more.

My concern is, that in conversations I sense people feel this would only apply to artists of a certain level, however, I strongly believe that this model will be key for new bands starting out, and those coming from territories such as North America and Australia into Europe for the first time.

As we all know, the pandemic means that most likely touring in the future will become more costly and thus any extra income your act can generate through a few t-shirt sales, live- stream access and so on will be valuable to their bottom line. It is our duty as those that defend artist careers to look at how we can both engage their audiences and increase the revenue streams.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Glasto’s Live at Worthy Farm gets cinema release

Glastonbury’s Festival’s upcoming Live at Worthy Farm live stream will also be broadcast at cinemas around the UK, organisers have announced.

Through a partnership with Trafalgar Releasing – the company behind record-breaking concert film releases by the likes of BTS and Coldplay, the latter of whom will play Live at Worthy Farm – the virtual festival, broadcast from Glastonbury’s Worthy Home site on Saturday 22 and Sunday 23 May, will screen in tandem at cinemas across the UK on Saturday.

Tickets for the cinema screenings, which go on sale today (12 May), are priced from £19.99.

Glastonbury Festival also today announced set times and new guests for the five-hour event, with a “unique spoken-word narrative” featuring PJ Harvey, Jarvis Cocker, Kae Tempest, George the Poet, Kurupt FM, Little Amal and festival founder Michael Eavis adding to previously announced sets from artists including Coldplay, Damon Albarn, Haim, Idles and Jorja Smith.

Live at Worthy Farm will be broadcast across four separate time zones (for EMEA; central, south and the east coast of North America; the west coast of North America; and Asia Pacific) on Saturday, with two global “encore” screenings on Sunday 23rd, at 2pm and 7pm BST. Tickets are priced at priced at £20, €23, US$27.50 & A$35.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Livestreamed shows here to stay, finds academic study

New research into livestreamed concerts, funded by the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council, has found artists are overwhelmingly positive about the power of reaching new audiences through virtual shows, even post-pandemic.

The research, led by Middlesex University and King’s College London, also offers insight into fan experiences of and expectations for livestreamed events and detailed advice on the technical and legal aspects of livestreaming.

The findings of the research project, which surveyed nearly 1,500 musicians and fans in the UK, include:

For their research, investigators also interviewed four concert promoters and an industry charity, and invited 200 music venues to send out the survey. Project partners included the Musicians’ Union, the Incorporated Society of Musicians, Music Venue Trust and promoter Serious.

The findings, however, conflict with a recent survey by trade body LIVE which found just 25% of fans will continue to engage with live streams after the pandemic period.

Over two thirds of those surveyed agreed livestreaming will remain an important part of the landscape after the pandemic

The project’s principal investigator, Middlesex University senior lecturer in music business and arts management Julia Haferkorn, says: “There were numerous comments from attenders unable to visit physical venues, even in non-pandemic times, expressing their appreciation of the availability of livestreamed concerts. Attenders also expressed an appreciation for being able to watch concerts by artists from other countries.”

“The most interesting insight from our research is the important role that livestreaming plays in giving music fans who suffer from social anxiety or other health-related issues access to live music performance,” adds study co-author Brian Kavanagh, lecturer in digital innovation at King’s College London.

Another co-author, pianist and Middlesex University lecturer in popular music Sam Leak, comments: “Our research has highlighted how important it is for audience members to be able to communicate with, and feel connected to, each other and the musicians performing. As a performer, this finding is interesting to me not only because it impacts my livestreaming practice, but also because it could well enhance the experience of my audiences in physical venues.”

The full report, which was published this morning (12 May), is available from www.livestreamingmusic.uk.

 


This article forms part of IQ’s Covid-19 resource centre – a knowledge hub of essential guidance and updating resources for uncertain times.

Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ IndexIQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.

Recovery Sessions: Industry leaders join IQ webinar

Festival Republic MD Melvin Benn, Artist Group International president Marsha Vlasic, ASM Global Europe EVP John Sharkey and CAA senior agent Maria May are among the confirmed speakers for Thursday’s must-see Recovery Sessions event.

The four industry titans join forces for ‘Industry Heads: Leading the way back’, one of three hour-long discussions forming part of the half-day webinar, which is free to access for all IQ subscribers.

Other newly announced speakers include ID&T COO Rosanne Janmaat, Primavera Sound director Pablo Soler, infectious disease expert Dr Josep Maria Llibre and Festival Republic production manager Luke Cowdell, who will share the lessons learned from pilot events in the Netherlands, Spain and the UK, and Dr Paul Twomey (Biosecurity Systems), Danielle Kennedy-Clark (The O2) and Ruth Khayat (Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality), who consider the ethical, financial and logistical implications of health passports as a means to restarting live entertainment.

Topics and timings announced for first Recovery Sessions

The Recovery Sessions kicks off at 14.00 BST (15.00 CEST) this Thursday, 13 May, here on the IQ site. Subscribers will need to log in and navigate to the dedicated Recovery Sessions page, which will be live from tomorrow.

The Recovery Sessions are kindly supported by ASM Global and POS solution provider goodtill.

To subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month, click here.

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.