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Nordic music biz reveals Top 20 under 30 list for 2021

The fourth annual Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 list has been revealed, honouring the ‘young forces driving the Nordic music industry forward’.

According to organsiers Nomex (Nordic Music Export), the winners were chosen by a panel of 15 judges from the Nordic music industry, based on “company growth, career path, recognition in the industry, influence in the industry in 2020, artistic development, innovation, concert revenues, sales, streaming, campaigns, radio and television publicity”.

This year’s Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 list comprises:

Nina Finnerud, head of UK at Music Norway, commented on the list: “With the Covid-19 pandemic, we have seen that the recruitment of young people into the music industry is more important than ever.

“It’s crucial to show the new generation of managers, labels, agents, festivals etc that it is a safe and rewarding industry to work in and choose as a career. It is also vital to make sure the artists have talented people to work with them and look out for their best interest in the future.”

This year’s Nordic Music Biz Top 20 under 30 will be honoured with a ceremony during by:Larm festival in Olso, Norway, on the 30 September.

Nomex was set up to facilitate growth and development in the Nordic music sector, and is a collaborative organisation set up by Export Music Sweden, Music Export Denmark, Music Finland, Iceland Music Export and Music Norway.

 


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The New Bosses: Class of 2021 revealed

The latest edition of IQ‘s New Bosses goes live today, celebrating the brightest talent aged 30 and under in the international live music business.

The New Bosses 2021 honours no fewer than a dozen young executives, as voted by their colleagues around the world.

The 14th edition of the annual list inspired the most engaged voting process to date, with hundreds of people taking the time to submit nominations.

Our distinguished dozen this year comprises promoters, bookers, agents, entrepreneurs and more, all involved in the international business and each of whom is making a real difference in their respective sector.

In alphabetical order, the New Bosses 2021 are:

As in previous years, full interviews with each of the 2021 New Bosses will appear online in the coming days and weeks. However, subscribers can read short individual profiles of each New Boss now in issue 103 of IQ Magazine.

Click here to subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month – or check out what you’re missing out on with the limited preview below:

 

 


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IQ 103 out now: New Bosses, Green Guardians & more

IQ 103, the latest issue of the international live music industry’s favourite monthly magazine, is available to read online now.

The September 2021 edition heralds the publication of the New Bosses, IQ’s annual celebration of 12 future industry leaders, nominated by the global live music industry. Subscribers can see the full list of our most promising 30-and-unders working in the business here.

This issue also marks the return of the Green Guardians Guide, championing 40 individuals, companies and initiatives that are driving the green agenda.

Elsewhere, deputy news editor Lisa Henderson looks at some of the new arena projects that promise to take indoor shows to the next level as the live entertainment industry returns to form.

For this edition’s columns and comments, we pass the mic to Paradigm’s Adele Slater, Yourope’s Holger Jan Schmidt and the Roadie Cookbook’s Nick Gosling and Julie Cotton.

And, in this month’s Your Shout, we ask industry leaders which two people they’d want on their team in a zombie apocalypse.

As always, the majority of the magazine’s content will appear online in some form in the next four weeks. However, if you can’t wait for your fix of essential live music industry features, opinion and analysis, click here to subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month – or check out what you’re missing out on with the limited preview below:

 

IQ subscribers can log in and read the full magazine now.

 


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UK’s CMA calls for stronger controls on resale sites

As live events return in the UK, the British competition regulator has proposed stronger rules to deal with illegal activity on non-price-capped secondary ticketing sites such as Viagogo and StubHub.

While laws exist to prevent the bulk-buying of tickets to resell at a profit, the speculative resale of tickets which the seller doesn’t yet own and the advertising of tickets using incorrect information, “swift and effective action by authorities is not possible under the current law”, says the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), which has outlined its recommendations in a new report, released this morning (16 August).

Among the measures the CMA is calling for are:

George Lusty, the CMA’s senior director for consumer protection, comments: “Over recent years we have taken strong action to protect people buying tickets from resellers online, and the secondary ticket websites are now worlds apart from those we saw before the CMA took action.

“If adopted, these proposals will help prevent people getting ripped off by unscrupulous resellers online”

“While it is clear that concerns about the sector remain, there are limits to what the CMA and other enforcers can do with their current powers. With live music and sporting events starting back up we want the government to take action to strengthen the current laws and introduce a licensing regime for secondary ticketing platforms.

“If adopted, these proposals will help prevent people getting ripped off by unscrupulous resellers online, and we stand ready to help the government to implement them.”

Adam Webb, campaign manager for anti-ticket touting group FanFair Alliance, comments: “With the steady return of live music events, this is a welcome and timely report from the Competition and Markets Authority. These proposed changes to regulating the so-called secondary ticketing market could have far-reaching future benefits for music fans. We now need to fully digest the implications and viability of introducing their suggested measures.

“However, it’s equally important that we’re not distracted from the here and now. Over the course of the pandemic, FanFair Alliance has continued to send substantial evidence to the CMA detailing a range of serious and current allegations about Viagogo in particular – from systematic breaches of consumer protection law to mass-scale fraud. This has gone on for far too long.

“The CMA still has a court order hanging over this company. Given Viagogo’s wretched history of compliance and ongoing complications around their $4bn merger with StubHub, it is now even more imperative that these allegations are investigated comprehensively and, if required, decisive enforcement action taken.”

Earlier this year the CMA ordered StubHub to sell its business outside North America in order for the authority to approve its acquisition by Viagogo. The companies have indicated they will comply, with plans for StubHub outside North America to be sold to a new owner.

 


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US FTC urged to ban ticket drip pricing

A group of New York academics have urged the US consumer watchdog, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), to ban so-called ‘drip pricing’, where additional charges are added at the end of the booking process for tickets and reservations.

In a petition to the FTC, Brian Canfield, Jack Lienke, Matthew Peterson and Max Sarinsky of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University School of Law, argue that drip pricing, which is “pervasive for concerts and other events that impose ticketing charges, as well as hotel and vacation rentals that charge cleaning or resort fees”, serves no legitimate business purpose and harms consumers, and so should be outlawed by the FTC.

Drip pricing is already banned in much of the world, with local FTC equivalents in the UK, the Netherlands, Canada, Russia, France and elsewhere having taken action to ensure the price consumers will pay for a concert ticket is displayed upfront.

In an article for the New York Times, Sarinsky (pictured), a senior attorney at the institute, says drip pricing is also unfair to businesses that don’t institute the practice. “Unless all sellers are required to disclose their full prices upfront, companies that opt for transparency risk losing market share to those that practice deception,” he writes.

“A ban on hidden fees and drip pricing would represent a huge win for consumers and improve the functioning of markets where the practice has taken root”

According to Ticket News, most online ticket sellers (both primary ticket agencies and secondary marketplaces) already offer ‘all-in’ pricing, with AXS and Vivid Seats the only platforms while hide extra charges “until [the] last step”.

As Sarinsky notes, drip pricing is already illegal in the airline industry in the US, while San Francisco and Washington have sued hospitality companies for ‘deceptively’ advertising travel packages and holiday rooms at an unattainable price.

“Under our proposal, all sellers would be required to disclose the full price of a product or service upfront, with any mandatory surcharges included as part of that total price,” he continues.

“A ban on hidden fees and drip pricing would represent a huge win for consumers and improve the functioning of markets where the practice has taken root. For the commission’s new majority, which is eager to protect consumers, such a regulation should be a high priority.”

 


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Join the (I)Q: Issue 102 is out now

Issue 102 of IQ Magazine is available to read online now, exclusively for IQ subscribers.

The August 2021 issue, which follows last month’s historic Pride-themed magazine, asks what’s next for livestreaming, checking in with experts in the sector to discover the future of a revenue stream that has helped keep artists and their teams afloat during the worst of the coronavirus crisis.

IQ 102 also looks at perhaps the only other part of the industry which has escaped relatively unscathed from the past 17 months: Touring exhibitions, whose producers and promoters have been able to take advantage of empty venues to remain operational while adhering to social distancing rules.

Elsewhere, IQ previews the upcoming (in-person) International Festival Forum in London; a host-renowned booking agencies pick the best new music and most promising acts on their rosters; and guest columnists get their teeth into topics including early-bird tickets and tips for returning to work.

As always, the majority of the magazine’s content will appear online in some form in the next four weeks. However, if you can’t wait for your fix of essential live music industry features, opinion and analysis, click here to subscribe to IQ for just £5.99 a month – or check out what you’re missing out on with the limited preview below:

 

IQ subscribers can log in and read the full magazine now.

 


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SA supreme court rejects appeal over concert death

The Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) of South Africa has rejected an appeal by one of the companies held responsible for a scaffolding tower collapse that killed one person at a Linkin Park show in South Africa in 2012.

In 2017, nearly five years after the death of 32-year-old Florentina Popa, Cape Town magistrate Ingrid Arntsen ruled that Vertex Scaffolding, Bothma Signs and Hirt & Carter – which constructed two large scaffolding towers at Cape Town Stadium and hung an advertisement for Lucozade between them – had been negligent and could be “causally linked” to Popa’s death, while Big Concerts, the promoter of the show, was found not to be responsible.

Popa died of blunt-force trauma after the tower fell on her in strong winds before Linkin Park show’s at the 58,309-seat stadium on 7 November 2012.

Arntsen said the companies should have foreseen that even moderate winds could have blown it over. “[W]inds with speeds of up to 15 metres per second were eminently foreseeable in Cape Town, and the towers could have been designed and constructed in such a way as to withstand the winds that were recorded on the day of the concert,” she said at the time.

“There is, in my view, no discernible material error of law … on which a review might be founded”

“It would appear, then, from all the evidence, that while the wind did come up and create problems, there was no real fear on the part of anyone in authority at the concert that the towers would blow over.”

Durban-based Hirt & Carter, which produces billboards and digital advertising, took the inquest’s findings to the Western Cape High Court, which dismissed the appeal, and then to the Supreme Court of appeal, which has upheld the high court’s ruling.

SCA judge Sulet Potterill, with four judges concurring, found that Arntsen “cannot be faulted for concluding that the death of the deceased was brought about by an act or omission that prima facie amounts to or involves an offence on the part of Hirt & Carter”, reports News24.

“It was premised on a finding of negligence on the part of Hirt & Carter. There is, in my view, no discernible material error of law by the magistrate of the kind on which a review might be founded. Indeed, I can find no error at all.”

Hirt & Carter’s appeal argued that the magistrate had erred when she found that it had omitted to supervise and manage the erection of the towers, which it said was the responsibility of a subcontractor (Bothma Signs).

In her judgment, Potterill disagreed, saying Arntsen “was correctly unpersuaded that the subcontracting of Bothma Signs and Vertex, against the facts of the case, could be relied on to exonerate Hirt & Carter.”

A further 19 people were injured in the accident, with 12 requiring hospitalisation.

 


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How to become an effective ally

During the last year, while working from home, I attended numerous online talks with a wide range of incredibly inspirational guest speakers, and I have followed debates during online webinars and conferences.

I have been amazed at the volume of organisations and initiatives out there working on bettering the live industry. In an effort to augment their impact, I have gathered all of their websites, podcasts and articles into a Google doc resources list.

For a more compact read, I would like to share a piece I wrote on practical tips for industry folks who want to be an ally – a person that actively promotes and aspires to advance the culture of inclusion through intentional and positive efforts – but are not sure what they can do.

LANGUAGE: Words matter. Take a critical look at your everyday language. How inclusive is it? For example, instead of ‘sound guy’ use ‘sound engineer.’ More on inclusive language here.

Call out inappropriate behaviour. Not because minorities can’t speak for themselves, but because they shouldn’t have to

ASSESS: What is your company culture? Ask queer, non-white, and female staff how they feel about the culture. Do they feel respected? Do they feel they are seen as equals? Do they feel they get the same opportunities and compensation? Is language seen as inclusive? Do complaints get taken seriously and are there repercussions for offenders?

ACKNOWLEDGE: Recognise the challenges queer people and also women, Black, indigenous, and people of colour are facing in the industry on a daily basis and throughout their careers. Believe them when they tell you of traumatising experiences.

SPEAK UP: Call others out on inappropriate behaviour and unacceptable language. Not because minorities can’t speak for themselves, but because they shouldn’t always be required to. This also goes for when they aren’t in the room.

Call your employer out when they are not creating equal opportunity for all genders. When you receive praise or an award or get asked to speak at an event or panel, do a little research on the diversity of the organisation and the event, and make a stand if there is a lack of it. Share the spotlight and invite a minority colleague along.

When hiring crew for your tour, look outside your direct network, collect diverse resumes

KEEP UP: Take an interest in the subject and keep up with new initiatives such as Diversify the Stage and 3T Project. Volunteer as a mentor.

ACT: Implement a zero-tolerance policy for micro-aggressions, inappropriate behaviour and unacceptable language. Announce it, repeat it, enforce it. Yes, this should be standard, but somehow it’s not.

FACILITATE: Request a diverse crew from vendors and local crew suppliers. If they don’t have any non-straight, white, cis-men on their books, perhaps this will send them a clear signal that they should. Add a diversity-and-inclusion clause to your touring rider. When hiring crew for your tour, look outside your direct network, collect diverse resumes and offer equal opportunity for career progress. Offer shadowing opportunities and internships.

NORMALISE: Don’t only invite queer people to the table/on a panel/on your podcast to discuss gender balance/diversity, but instead treat them as you would any other guests and speakers.

 


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French festival sues over ‘gutter punk’ comments

A French electronic music festival is suing two local politicians for defamation over derogatory remarks the pair allegedly posted on social media.

Les Dentelles Électroniques – which takes place on Sunday 7 August, with German techno DJ Thomas Schumacher headlining – is taking legal action against Corentin Triplet and Jocelyne Cieslak, both municipal councillors in Brebières in northern France, who are accused of writing libellous posts about the festival on Twitter and Facebook, respectively.

According to Les Dentelles Électroniques, Triplet posted on Twitter on 17 July to say he was “surprised” to see Brebières “associated with an event for punks à chiens”, the French term for gutter punks (literally “dog punks”), a subsection of the punk world characterised by homelessness, vagrancy and, sometimes, voluntary unemployment and antisocial behaviour.

“By this tweet, Mr Triplet clearly despises the organisers of Les Dentelles Électroniques, as well as its festivalgoers and all the members of the electronic music ecosystem, associating them with ‘gutter punks’,” reads a statement from the festival. “However, the festival is very far from the image to which Mr Triplet refers. Indeed, everyone involved with this event maintains very good relations with the security forces [and] municipal police […] in order to guarantee the best possible conditions for its operation.”

“Fhe festival is very far from the image to which Mr Triplet refers”

Cieslak, meanwhile, is accused of making, on 21 July, a public post on her Facebook account where she appears to “question the the charitable nature” of the 1,500-person festival, “undermining the honour” of the festival’s organiser, the foundation CGDPC (Chti G Découverte Passion et Culturelle).

“The festival organisers find it unfortunate to want to harm such an event in the current health context [the pandemic] and the resulting difficulties,” reads a statement from CGDPC.

“In light of the above, the festival organisers decided to file a complaint on Thursday 22 July 2021 against the two authors of these publications” under the Press Freedom Act of 29 July 1881, it adds.

The festival is supported in its lawsuit by electronic industry association Technopol, which says it stands with the “organisers and festivalgoers implicated by these illicit comments and assures them of its full confidence”.

 


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Sponsor refuses to pay ‘super-spreader’ festival

Cider company Magners is facing legal action for allegedly refusing to pay more than £1.7 million in owed sponsorship money after a partner festival became a Covid-19 ‘super-spreader’ event.

Magners, owned by Dublin-based C&C Group, claims that the decision by Cheltenham Festival to push ahead in 2020 caused the four-day festival serious reputational damage and as such should have been cancelled.

The popular horse-racing event took place with over 250,000 visitors from 10 to 13 March 2020, ten days before the first UK lockdown on 23 March. It also featured a new live music-focused enclosure, The Park, featuring DJ sets from Nick Grimshaw, Laura Whitmore, Roman Kemp and more.

According to the Telegraph, Cheltenham Festival 2020 was “widely seen as a Covid superspreader event”, though organisers and the Department of Health and Social Care confirm the event was operating within the public health guidance at the time. (Just over a week earlier, on 1 March, the UK’s deputy chief medical officer had told event organisers there was no need to stop major events to halt the spread of the coronavirus.)

C&C claims the decision to push ahead in 2020 caused the festival serious reputational damage

Magners had agreed to sponsor the festival, as well as other meetings at Cheltenham Racecourse, from 2018 to 2022 in a deal worth just over £1.7 million. However, in documents filed with the High Court in London, C&C claims that the 2020 Cheltenham Festival should have been cancelled, and revealed that it also did not want the Magners name associated with the 2021 event, which was held behind closed doors.

The Jockey Club, owner of the racecourse, is now suing C&C for damages of £1,733,761.51, arguing that it has violated the terms of the sponsorship agreement, which remains in force.

A racing industry source tells the Telegraph it is confident the Jockey Club will win the ensuing legal battle, saying: “Magners appear to be trying to throw mud at the Cheltenham Festival because they know their own defence is weak. The Jockey Club appear to be confident of their case, that the sponsorship contract agreed with [Magners] stands, is valid and must be honoured.”

C&C declined to comment on the ongoing legal proceedings.

 


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