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Japan mulls ID card plan for concerts

Under proposals being considered to combat ticket touting, concert-goers could require government-issued ID cards to enter venues

By James Hanley on 02 Dec 2022

Kei Ikuta appointed senior VP, Live Nation Japan

Concert-goers in Japan could require government-issued ID cards to attend gigs under plans being considered by the government to help combat ticket touting.

According to Japan Today via Yomiuri Shimbun, the country’s minister of digital affairs Taro Kano has told the cabinet’s digital agency to open talks with event organisers to encourage them to require ticket-holders to present their My Number Card when buying tickets, and again when entering venues.

The card is typically used as a form of identification for pension, tax, and other government functions, and the requirement would confirm the fan attending the show was the same person who bought the ticket.

However, critics of the proposal say it would make it impossible to purchase tickets for the 40% of residents who are yet to apply for a card, and would also rule out those without smartphones.

The move would also lock travellers and short-term visitors out of live entertainment events unless organisers set up separate protocols

In addition, the report notes the move would also lock travellers and short-term visitors out of live entertainment events unless organisers set up separate protocols.

Arama Japan recalls Japan’s previous attempts to curb touting, including the introduction of facial recognition technology and the launch of campaign group Tenbai No (Resale No) in 2014, backed by 116 music acts, 24 events, and four music organisations. Tenbai No took out full page ads in two of Japan’s biggest newspapers, which read: “We are against the high-priced reselling of tickets, which is depriving music of its future.”

In the same year, it notes, a woman was arrested after allegedly making 10 million yen (€70,500) profit by scalping tickets for boy band Arashi.

 


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