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Sweden dedicates extra 1.5bn kr to culture

The governing parties say the funding will compensate for the economic consequences caused by the pandemic and help to restart culture

By IQ on 14 Sep 2020

Swedish prime minister Stefan Löfven

Swedish prime minister Stefan Löfven


image © Presidential Press and Information Office

Sweden’s governing parties are dedicating an extra 1.5 billion kr (€144m) to culture this year to compensate for the economic consequences caused by the pandemic and ensure the sector’s full recovery.

In addition, an extra 1bn kr will be set aside for 2021 for the restructuring and restart of cultural activities throughout the country. Details of its distribution will be revealed at a later date.

The government has also unveiled future plans to invest in cultural infrastructure – including concert halls – by increasing the cultural cooperation model by 300m kr in 2021 and by 150m kr in the following years.

The government has also unveiled future plans to invest in cultural infrastructure including concert halls

Finally, a further 80m kr will be set aside annually, from 2021, to “strengthen the conditions of cultural creators throughout the country,” which will see an increase in the number of grants and scholarships available.

Elsewhere, the government recently gave freelancers a lifeline when it announced a 3.5bn kr support package for sole traders that have been severely financially impacted during the pandemic this year, as well as an extra 1.5bn kr set aside for 2021.

Sole traders will now be able to receive compensation for 75% of their loss in turnover, provided they had a turnover of 200,000 kr the previous year.

Sweden is still operating with a 50-person limit on public gatherings, which has been in force since mid-March. However, the strict limit has forced event organisers to get creative with formats.

  • This article was amended on 15 September. An earlier version incorrectly converted 1.5bn kronor to 1.4bn euros.

 


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