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Skiddle reports most successful year to date

In 2018, Skiddle experienced a 30% growth in revenue and took £60m in ticket sales, in a record-breaking year for the the ticketing platform

By Anna Grace on 19 Feb 2019

Skiddle 2018 growth

Skiddle co-founder, Ben Sebborn


image © Skiddle

Event guide and ticketing outlet, Skiddle, has published its year-end results for 2018, the company’s most successful year to date.

Skiddle announced a 30% increase in turnover, gross ticket sales of £60 million and a record-breaking 3.5 million ticket sales – a 22.5% increase on 2017.

The ticketing platform has experienced staff growth of 27% in the past year, establishing new offices in Manchester and London to add to existing bases in Lancashire and Liverpool.

Over 20,000 promoters used Skiddle to list more than 88,000 live events last year, a 21% increase in listings from 2017. The company grew its digital user base too, registering 20% web page views, 69% more users on iOS devices and 40% on Android.

“We are delighted to announce such strong figures for our 2018 year-end and are pleased to report growth across all areas of the business,” says Skiddle co-founder and technical director, Ben Sebborn.

“Challenging the biggest players in the industry is important, but championing grassroots venues, up-and-coming artists and independent promoters will always be imperative and a marker of our success”

“One of our key focuses for 2018 was growing our team and investing in innovation. As well as re-launching our event discovery app, we also re-imagined our ‘Rep’ initiative that rewards customer loyalty. Our flexible Re:Sell and Cool:Off platforms were also rolled out to more customers than ever before.”

Sebborn highlights the importance of maintaining a “customer-centric, authentic and hassle-free approach” to business.

“Challenging the biggest players in the industry is important, but championing grassroots venues, up-and-coming artists and independent promoters will always be imperative and a marker of our success,” he says.

In 2017, Skiddle refunded all attendees of Liverpool’s disastrous Hope & Glory festival (12,500-cap.), after day two of the event was called off. The ticketing agency later revealed that it lost £65,000 as a result, but maintained the decision to refund was “entirely the right thing to do”.

 


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