fbpx
x

The latest industry news to your inbox.

    

I'd like to hear about marketing opportunities

    

I accept IQ Magazine's Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy

news

NTS charges six over alleged ticket scams

National Trading Standards has brought prosecutions against UK resellers it accuses of bulk-buying tickets using multiple identities and credit cards

By IQ on 02 Oct 2018

York magistrates' court

York magistrates' court


image © David Dixon

Six people have been charged with money laundering by the UK’s National Trading Standards (NTS) for allegedly operating multimillion-pound secondary ticketing scams.

The consumer protection agency made a number of arrests last December – part of an investigation into the activities of “businesses that buy and sell tickets in bulk” – for alleged breaches of the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations Act of 2008.

The prosecutions, brought by NTS in York magistrate’s court, target three separate firms, reports the Daily Record.

Timothy Connor, his girlfriend Francesca Armstrong and parents Andrew Connor and Vachirawan Connor, all of Surrey, are alleged to have used multiple names, addresses and credit cards, as well as “sophisticated browser software” – ticket-buying bots were banned in the UK last April – to obtain and sell tickets.

All accused have indicated they will plead not guilty

Prosecutors say their company, Connoco, bought £2.3m worth of tickets between 2015 and 2017 and sold them on for £4.5m.

Peter Hunter and David Smith, of London, placed tickets on secondary ticketing websites 21,000 times between 2015 and 2018. Their company, BZZ, is alleged to have bought more than £4m of tickets and racked up sales in excess of £10.8m.

Both the Connors and Hunter and Smith have indicated they will plead not guilty.

The court additionally heard the six accused would be tried alongside a third group facing the same charges, Maria Chenery-Woods, Mark Woods and Linda Chenery of TQ Ltd (Ticket Queen).

 


Get more stories like this in your inbox by signing up for IQ Index, IQ’s free email digest of essential live music industry news.