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EU workers’ directive ‘could lead to tour cancellations’

An amendment to the posted workers' directive enshrining equal pay across the European Union "hardly takes into consideration" the needs of the live biz, says Pearle*

By Jon Chapple on 24 Oct 2017

European Union flags

image © Thijs ter Haar

European live industry association Pearle* has warned that proposed EU legislation on the rights of ‘posted workers’ risks undermining the touring sector.

The European parliament’s employment committee voted on 16 October in favour of a revision to the Posting of Workers Directive 1996, proposed by MEPs Elisabeth Morin-Chartier (France) and Agnes Jongerius (Netherlands), which rules that EU workers in another member state are entitled to the same remuneration, including bonuses, as local workers.

A press release from the EU says the new legislation would ensure that “posted workers are better protected”, with Jongerius calling the bill “an important step to create a social Europe that protects workers and makes sure there is fair competition”.

“We must stop the race to the bottom in the European labour market,” she says, “to reach the goal of equal pay for equal work at the same workplace.”

“The live performance sector is characterised by thousands of SMEs who lack the staff and means to undertake all these requirements”

However, Pearle* (Performing Arts Employers Associations League Europe), which represents more than 7,000 music and performing arts organisations across Europe, says lawmakers have failed to take into account the needs of the live business, warning that if – as expected – the revision becomes law, it could have a negative knock-on effect on touring.

“Pearle* regrets that, in the discussions by co-legislators, the impact on administrative burdens, compliance costs and highly complicated calculations for very short-term posting is hardly taken into consideration,” the organisation says in a statement. “Because of the disproportionate burdens, the proposed rules may lead to cancellation of tours and less diverse offerings in concert halls and venues.

“Pearle* therefore calls upon the co-legislators to formulate proportionate and reasonable solutions for very-short term posting situations. The live performance sector is characterised by thousands of SMEs who lack the staff and means to undertake all the requirements and conditions that would apply in the same way for short-term posting as for posting of several months or more.

“The result is that those SMEs in the sector may well have to cover hundreds and even thousands of postings due to the very nature of touring in the sector.”

 


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