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Green Music Australia calls for plastic-free July

A host of new artist ambassadors, including Bernard Fanning and the recently reunited Killing Heidi, have committed to ditching plastic bottles at their shows

By IQ on 14 Jun 2017

Bernard Fanning, Bring Your Own Bottle (#BYOBottle), Green Music Australia

#BYOBottle ambassador Bernard Fanning and his reusable, non-plastic water bottle


image © Bernard Fanning

Some of the biggest names in Australian music, including Paul Kelly, Killing Heidi and Powderfinger frontman Bernard Fanning, have pledged their support for Green Music Australia, which is campaigning for a phase-out of disposable plastic water bottles at venues and festivals.

As the Australian nonprofit gears up for Plastic Free July, an international campaign that urges people “to choose to refuse single-use plastic during July”, it is announcing 31 new Bring Your Own Bottle (#BYOBottle) artist ‘ambassadors’ who have committed to banning disposable plastic bottles at their shows, including asking for ‘green’ drinks riders free of plastic and encouraging the implementation of tap-water stations.

To become an ambassador, artists first need to copy the below text into their riders:

We travel with our own reusable water bottles in order to cut down on the unnecessary waste and environmental damage caused by disposable bottles. Please ensure that jugs or refilling stations with cold and room-temperature water are made available for us to use.We encourage you to consider phasing out disposable water bottles across your business and providing free water refilling stations to punters, staff and artists. Green Music Australia is happy to help: info@greenmusic.org.au

Other ambassadors include Missy Higgins, Ball Park Music and All Our Exes Live in Texas, reports Music Feeds.

Says Green Music Australia’s executive director, Tim Hollo: “It’s fantastic to see so many people getting behind this vision of a clean, green music scene. Throw-away bottles kill wildlife, contribute to global warming and leach toxins into our air and water. Let’s junk them and junk the throw-away culture with them.”

Other Green Music Australia campaigns include Amped Up, which provided assistance and advice to venues seeking to be more energy efficient, and Rock the Reef, an event which aimed to raise awareness of the need for protecting the Great Barrier Reef.

 


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