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‘Every country should have a music export office’

Sound Diplomacy has issued a call to arms for export office-less nations ahead of the presentation of its Music Export Pledge at TGE on Friday

By IQ on 16 May 2017

Global Music Export Pledge, Sound Diplomacy

image © Sound Diplomacy

Music market development agency Sound Diplomacy has called for every country in the world to establish a music export initiative, arguing those without export offices are missing out on “economic and cultural opportunities every day” and “limiting the opportunity to create skills, jobs and a better quality of life for their creatives”.

The call to action forms part of Sound Diplomacy’s Global Music Export Pledge, to be presented this Friday at The Export Conference at The Great Escape in Brighton.

The pledge highlights the benefits of music export to governments and councils around the world, outlining how a music export office should operate, its benefits to the economy and how to develop new talent and provide support to the local music industry.

It comprises eight key recommendations:

  • Recognise the importance of your people
    This is a people business first and foremost
  • Understand what it means to be ‘export-ready’
    Always measure, strategise and enhance what you do
  • Prepare your artists to become export-ready
    Each artist needs a path
  • Keep networking
    Knowing who, what, where and why
  • Develop a targeted database
    Maintain calm through the storm
  • Provide appropriate financial support
    When you can, be the catalyst
  • Focus on branding
    Taking a step up to take a step back
  • Encourage and assist imports
    Export is a two-way street

“We want every country in the world to have a thriving, active music export initiative,” reads a statement from Sound Diplomacy, which describes itself as the “leading global advisor in increasing the value of music and night culture in cities, places and developments” and whose clients include export initiatives in Europe, the Americas, Australasia and Africa.

“It doesn’t matter how it is set up. It matters how its functions impact the artists it serves. Talent is everywhere, and great talent deserves the best support. Only some countries and regions have music export initiatives; those that do are very lucky, because the business leaders running them are providing opportunities for artists across the sector every day.

“So let’s learn from each other, work together and make music export an integral aspect of national, regional and local cultural policy.”

 


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