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feature

Rollin’ all over the world

The music biz relies on an army of specialists working tirelessly to ensure crews, artists and entourages enjoy hassle-free travel as they take shows around the world…

By IQ on 20 Oct 2016

IQ 67 transport feature

… Adam Woods talks to those at the sharp end of the travel and transport sector

Virtually every business sector has a knock-out reason why the British public shouldn’t have voted for Brexit, but it’s hard to imagine any with better arguments than the live music transport business. For some, a departure from the EU might herald a blessed release from the tyranny of European law. For those in the touring game, it is likely to mean all the same laws, accompanied by a whole new barrage of outsider hassle.

2016 is turning out to be a good year for the bus companies, air charter brokers, visa experts and travel agents of this world

British artists will still visit Europe, of course, and UK transport companies will presumably assist them, but their new touring experience may or may not include: fresh queues at customs; mind-boggling delays at Dover; visa and immigration implications at airports across the continent; new restrictions on market access for British-registered charter jets and buses; plus any number of other administrative and legislative sour grapes.

But in other respects, 2016 is turning out to be a good year for the bus companies, air charter brokers, visa experts and travel agents of this world, buoyed by another busy round of global touring, and intensified, no doubt, by the prospect of tougher and trickier times ahead.

 


Read the rest of this feature in issue 67 of IQ Magazine.

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